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Nevada lawmaker resurrects Arizona-style immigration law

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June 30, 2012

Nevada

By: Stephan Burklin
CARSON CITY, Nevada: The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the best-known part of Arizona’s controversial immigration law prompted one Nevada lawmaker to redouble his efforts to enact similar legislation in the Silver State. [1]

Assemblyman Ira Hansen asked legislative staffers to rewrite a measure of his that failed last session. [1]

Although he thinks that the Supreme Court’s decision would give his bill a boost by defining the constitutional parameters, he believes the chances of passage are still low. [1]

According to the Las Vegas Sun, Hansen says that “casinos and bigger contractors” will prevent the bill from being signed into law. [1]

While the industry argues that such a law could cause tourism boycotts of the state, Hansen says that casinos and contractors are fretting about the potential costs. [1]

According to the Las Vegas Sun, Hansen said, “It’s cheap labor, bottom line. In a casino, they’re trying to staff up. If you go on a residential construction site, finding an English-speaking guy is pretty rare. They’re trying to do it at the lowest prices possible.” [1]

But opposition to Hansen’s proposal also comes from other corners.

Gov. Brian Sandoval, a Republican, said after the Court’s decision that he believes Nevada doesn’t need an Arizona-style law, even though it would be constitutional. [2]

"I never thought a similar law was needed in Nevada," he said on Monday. [2]

The Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Nevada, Dane S. Claussen, also said that “show me your papers” laws condone racial profiling, undermine effective law enforcement, and have no place in Nevada values, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal. [2]

"Nevada is not Arizona, and we will continue to forge our own path," he said. [2]

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