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During the [[New Jersey General Assembly elections, 2011|2011 election]], the total contributions to the 215 Assembly candidates was $25,001,973.  The top 10 contributors were:<ref name=<ref name=ftm/>
  
 
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Revision as of 09:43, 25 February 2014


2013
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New Jersey General Assembly elections, 2011

Primary Competitiveness

Majority controlCampaign contributions

Competitiveness Analysis
Candidates unopposed by a major partyPrimary challengesRetiring incumbents

RedistrictingQualifications

List of candidates
District 1District 2District 3District 4District 5District 6District 7District 8District 9District 10District 11District 12District 13District 14District 15District 16District 17District 18District 19District 20District 21District 22District 23District 24District 25District 26District 27District 28District 29District 30District 31District 32District 33District 34District 35District 36District 37District 38District 39District 40
Other 2011 State Elections
Louisiana (S), (H)Mississippi (S), (H)
New Jersey (S), (GA)Virginia (S), (H)

Other 2011 Election coverage
Primary electionsStatewide elections, 2011State legislative special elections, 2011State Senate electionsState House electionsGubernatorial elections, 20112011 ballot measures

New Jersey General Assembly

Elections for the office of New Jersey State Representative were held on November 8, 2011. Each of the state's 80 representatives were up for election. Members are elected to two-year terms.

The November 2011 election led to a net gain for the Democratic Party of one seat in the chamber.

All 80 district seats in the New Jersey General Assembly had three or more candidates on the 2011 general election ballot, leaving no districts uncontested.

During the 2011 election, the total contributions to the 215 Assembly candidates was $25,001,973.[1]

The 2011 election were the state's first election under its new legislative maps. Following the 2010 census, the state redrew its legislative boundaries to account for growth and shifts in the state's population. The New Jersey Redistricting Commission was responsible for this process. New Jersey's 80 assembly seats are comprised of 40 legislative districts. Voters choose up to two representatives on their ballot. While candidates can run "bracketed" with one another, this does not require a vote for both candidates.

According to a Wall Street Journal analysis of unofficial county results, New Jersey voters set a new record low turnout of roughly 26%. Only 1.4 million of the state's 5.2 million registered voters actually cast a ballot. The previous record was 31% in 1999.[2]

Candidates who wished to run for New Jersey General Assembly on the Democratic Party or Republican Party tickets were required to file their nominating signatures and meet other filing requirements by April 11, 56 days before the statewide primary election, in order to have their names listed on the ballot.[3]

See also: New Jersey State Senate elections, 2011

General election results

The following candidates won election on November 8, 2011:

  1. Alberto Coutinho
  2. Alex DeCroce
  3. Alison McHose
  4. Amy Handlin
  5. Angel Fuentes
  6. Angelica Jimenez
  7. Annette Quijano
  8. Anthony Bucco, Jr.
  9. Benjie Wimberly
  10. Bonnie Watson Coleman
  11. Brian Rumpf
  12. Caroline Casagrande
  13. Celeste Riley
  14. Charles Mainor
  15. Chris Brown, New Jersey
  16. Christopher Brown, New Jersey
  17. Cleopatra Tucker
  18. Connie Wagner
  19. Craig Coughlin
  20. Daniel Benson
  21. David Rible
  22. David Russo
  23. David Wolfe, New Jersey
  24. Declan O'Scanlon, Jr.
  25. DiAnne Gove
  26. Erik Peterson
  27. Gabriela Mosquera
  28. Gary Chiusano
  29. Gary Schaer
  30. Gerald Green
  31. Gilbert Wilson
  32. Gordon Johnson
  33. Gregory McGuckin
  34. Herbert Conaway, Jr.
  35. Holly Schepisi
  36. Jack Ciattarelli
  37. Jason O'Donnell
  38. Jay Webber
  39. John Amodeo
  40. John Burzichelli
  41. John DiMaio
  42. John McKeon
  43. John Wisniewski
  44. Jon Bramnick
  45. Joseph Cryan
  46. Joseph Egan
  47. L. Grace Spencer
  48. Linda Stender
  49. Louis Greenwald
  50. Marlene Caride
  51. Mary Pat Angelini
  52. Matthew Milam
  53. Michael Carroll
  54. Mila Jasey
  55. Nancy Munoz
  56. Nelson Albano
  57. Pamela Lampitt
  58. Patrick Diegnan, Jr.
  59. Paul Moriarty
  60. Peter Barnes, III
  61. Peter Biondi
  62. Ralph Caputo
  63. Reed Gusciora
  64. Robert Clifton
  65. Robert Schroeder
  66. Ronald Dancer
  67. Ruben Ramos, Jr.
  68. Scott Rudder
  69. Scott Rumana
  70. Sean Connors
  71. Sean Kean
  72. Shavonda Sumter
  73. Sheila Oliver
  74. Thomas Giblin
  75. Timothy Eustace
  76. Troy Singleton
  77. Upendra Chivukula
  78. Valerie Vainieri Huttle
  79. Vincent Prieto
  80. Wayne DeAngelo

Odd-year elections

New Jersey is just one of four states that held state house elections in 2011. The other three states that hold house elections in odd-numbered years are Louisiana, Mississippi and Virginia.

New Jersey began holding elections in odd numbered years when the state adopted a new constitution in 1947. Prior to the new constitution, members of the Assembly were elected to one-year terms, members of the Senate to three-year terms and governors to three-year terms. The new constitution changed the term structure to include two years for representatives and four year terms for senators and governors. Because the constitution was adopted in an odd-numbered year, elections were also held in odd-numbered years and have continued in such a manner to this day.[4]

The notion also exists that the reason for odd year elections exists to insulate New Jersey politics from national politics. Former New Jersey Governor Alfred E. Driscoll made the following statement before the constitutional convention in 1947:[4]

...the election for a Governor and for Assemblymen should not coincide with a Presidential election. The importance of a gubernatorial election merits an election that will not be overshadowed by a national contest for the Presidency. The problems confronting the State are frequently distinct from those confronting the nation...

Impact of redistricting

See also: Redistricting in New Jersey

Every 10 years, the Constitution requires states to redraw Congressional and state legislative districts based on updated Census information. In 2011, New Jersey was the first state to complete its state legislative redistricting. Its 40 districts are re-drawn by a reapportionment commission comprised of 5 Democrats, 5 Republicans appointed by their respective party chairs. When the committee deadlocked over new maps, an 11th, nonpartisan member was appointed by the New Jersey Supreme Court. For the third consecutive decade, Alan Rosenthal was chosen as the tie-breaking member. After the members from each party drafted proposals, Rosenthal cast the deciding vote, siding with the Democratic proposal. The new map could force more than 6 incumbents to retire or re-locate. In the Senate, two districts pit incumbents against one another.

The selection of the new maps disappointed Republicans, but the party expressed confidence about its chances. Governor Chris Christie took a special interest in the process, but was ultimately unable to sway the commission's final decision. A New Jersey Tea Party group filed suit over the plan in April -- 38 other plaintiffs from across the state have in joined the suit. The suit did not delay the state primary.

Majority control

See also: Partisan composition of state houses

Going into the November 2011 elections, the Republican Party was the majority party in 31 state houses. One chamber (Nebraska) is officially nonpartisan and in one chamber (Alaska), several Republicans vote with a caucus other than the Republican caucus. In 19 states, the Democratic Party was the majority party. The New Jersey General Assembly was one of the 19 chambers with a Democratic Party majority.

In the other 3 states with state house elections in 2011 (Louisiana, Mississippi and Virginia), the Republican Party was the majority party in Louisiana and Virginia, while the Democratic Party was the majority party in Mississippi. The partisan composition of the New Jersey General Assembly as follows:

New Jersey General Assembly
Party As of November 2011 After the 2011 Election
     Democratic Party 47 48
     Republican Party 33 32
Total 80 80

Races to watch

  • Districts 2, 14, & 38: These districts were considered among the most competitive in the November 8 general election. Both PolitickerNJ and Asbury Park Press identified these districts as some of few competitive races in 2011. APP noted that all three districts became more Republican on paper with a shrinking proportion of registered Democrats. However, PolitickerNJ predicted that these changes will not ultimately result in GOP pick ups. NJ Spotlight even predicted that Assemblyman Vincent Polistina's decision to run for the Senate, may weaken the GOP assembly ticket in District 2.[5][6][7]
  • District 1: PolitickerNJ noted that District 1 appeared to have Republican leanings--on paper. However, strong historical support for Senator Jeff Van Drew (D) called the predictive power of these figures into question. However, NJSpotlight noted that Republicans seem to be focused on reclaiming the district's assembly seats. Nevertheless, redistricting weakened the Republican base in District 1.[6][7]
  • District 7: District 7 was split between both parties, with Republicans controlling the Senate seat and Democrats controlling the two Assembly seats. PolitickerNJ noted that several Republican-leaning areas were added to the area in redistricting, but in these districts came from a solidly Republican districts, Democratic turnout in these areas may expand in 2011. Joseph Malone, III (R) was also moved into District 7 via redistricting, but decided to retire. Jack Conners (D), on the other hand, was moved out of District 7 by redistricting and ultimately decided to retire. Troy Singleton was quickly appointed to replace Connors in the Assembly and run in District 7.[6][7]
  • District 11: District 11 was reshaped to become a minority opportunity district. While NJSpotlight predicted a win for the GOP ticket, PolitickerNJ noted that the Asbury Park Press endorsement of Vin Gopal (D) may increase his chances of election. Also, the Democratic challengers in District 11 raised over $100,000.[6][7]
  • District 16: District 16 was also significantly reshaped in 2011, moving its population center away from Somerset County. All of the Republican candidates (two incumbents and one challenger) were from the Somerset area. However, NJSpotlight noted that despite these changes and balanced partisan registration, the Democratic ticket remained relatively unfamiliar to voters.[6][7]

Christie predicts "historic" results

About two weeks before the general election, Governor Chris Christie (R) predicted that his party would retain its legislative seats on November 8. History, however, suggests that midterm losses are the norm for the governor's political party. Christie acknowledged that the results would "defy history."[8]

Competitiveness

Candidates unopposed by a major party

2011 state legislative elections analyzed using a Competitiveness Index

All 80 district seats in the New Jersey General Assembly had three or more candidates on the 2011 general election ballot, leaving no districts uncontested.

Primary challenges

Twelve incumbents faced competition in the June 7 primary.

The following 12 incumbents (8 Democrats, 4 Republicans) won their primaries:

Retiring incumbents

Eighteen incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 62 (77.5%) ran for re-election. Of the 18 incumbents who did not run for re-election, 3 are Democrats, 6 are Republicans, and one is an independent.

Incumbents who retired are:

Incumbents displaced by redistricting

Eight incumbent representatives were displaced by the 2011 redistricting process. Of the 8 displaced incumbents, 1 is a Democrat and 7 are Republicans.

Incumbents who were displaced by redistricting:

  • District 4: Incumbent Republican Domenick DiCicco now resides in district 3.
  • District 11: Incumbent Republican David Rible now resides in district 30.
  • District 12: Incumbent Republican Caroline Casagrande now resides in district 11.
  • District 12: Incumbent Republican Declan O'Scanlon, Jr. now resides in district 13.
  • District 16: Incumbent Republican Denise Coyle, who did not seek re-election.
  • District 30: Incumbent Republican Joseph Malone, III now resides in district 7.
  • District 30: Incumbent Republican Ronald Dancer now resides in district 12.
  • District 32: Incumbent Democrat Joan Quigley, who did not seek re-election.

Primary competitiveness

See also: Ballotpedia news report on New Jersey primary competitiveness

Despite the heightened political climate of the 2010 general elections, New Jersey's 2011 General Assembly primaries remained mostly uncompetitive. As in previous years, a large majority of the state's major party candidates proceeded to the general election without a primary challenge. Of the 79 party primaries, only 15 were contested. In the General Assembly, a contested primary featured at least 3 candidates in the top-2 vote getters advanced to the general election.

Comparing Contested Primaries in Past General Assembly Elections
Democrats Republicans Total
2007 2009 2011 2007 2009 2011 2007 2009 2011
Open contested 2 0 2 1 6 6 3 6 8
Open uncontested 15 15 14 24 17 18 39 32 32
Incumbent contested 3 9 5 3 8 2 6 6 7
Incumbent uncontested 20 16 18 9 7 14 29 23 32
No Candidates 0 0 1 3 2 0 3 2 1
Total contested 5 9 7 4 14 8 9 23 15
Total uncontested 35 31 32 33 24 32 68 55 64

Qualifications

In order to be a candidate to run for the New Jersey General Assembly, a candidate must:

  • Be a citizen of the United States
  • Reside for no less than two years in the district the candidate plans to represent.
  • Be 21 years of age or older.
  • Obtain 100 signatures via petition and submit the signatures to the New Jersey Secretary of State[9].
  • Disclose any criminal convictions[10].

Campaign contributions

During the 2011 election, the total contributions to the 215 Assembly candidates was $25,001,973. The top 10 contributors were:[1]

2011 Donors, New Jersey General Assembly
Donor Amount
New Jersey State Laborers $344,500
New Jersey Education Association $325,900
New Jersey Republican Party $296,965
New Jersey Regional Council of Carpenters $296,950
Election Fund of Cook Conaway & Singleton $245,493
New Jersey Association of Realtors $242,450
1199 Seiu United Healthcare Workers East $185,400
Communications Workers New Jersey $162,500
Cmte to Elect Lesniak Cryan & Quijano $157,485
Democratic Assembly Campaign Cmte $155,183

On November 3, the New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission published fundraising figures detailing the top fundraisers through October 25, 2011. During this period candidates from all districts spent a total of $24,828,692--an 8% drop from 2007. The top ten fundraising districts are as follows:[11]

District Amt. Raised Amt. Spent
District 2 $3,762,118 $3,161,517
District 38 $3,394,798 $3,023,924
District 27 $2,596,811 $1,478,438
District 3 $2,331,779 $1,753,254
District 7 $2,139,112 $1,642,013
District 14 $1,971,949 $1,850,513
District 36 $1,690,651 $1,205,468
District 1 $1,302,937 $1,149,273
District 18 $1,148,826 $809,782
District 17 $1,147,997 $352,571

Endorsements

Labor unions

On August 4, the New Jersey AFL-CIO voted to deny 22 Democrats, most notably Senators Stephen Sweeney and Donald Norcross, their endorsement in the 2011 general election. Earlier this year, these Democrats crossed the aisle and voted in favor of preventing public employee unions from collectively bargaining for health benefits and pensions--a move opposed by state labor unions.[7]

Although their endorsements were voted down, Sweeney and Norcross just barely missed the mark. A two-thirds vote of the endorsement convention is needed to bestow an official endorsement. Sweeney and Norcross fell short with 61% and 59%, respectively.[7]

Four Assembly Democrats (also union officials) who voted against the revocation of bargaining rights received enthusiastic endorsements--Thomas Giblin, Wayne DeAngelo, Joseph Egan and Nelson Albano all received endorsements on August 4. No Republicans were endorsed by the AFL-CIO.[7]

List of candidates

District 1

Partisan dominance in state houses
heading into the 2011 state legislative elections
New Jersey State LegislatureLouisiana State LegislatureMississippi State LegislatureVirginia State Legislature2011 Partisan Houses.png
Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Nelson Albano: 2,539 Approveda Incumbent Albano was first elected to District 1 in 2005.
  • Matthew Milam: 2,413 Approveda Incumbent Milam was first elected to District 1 in 2007.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Nelson Albano: 24,794 Approveda
Democratic Party Matthew Milam: 22,207 Approveda
Republican Party Suzanne Walters: 20,810
Republican Party Samuel Fiocchi: 21,156

District 2

Note: Incumbent Vincent Polistina (R) did not run for re-election. He instead ran for District 2 of the State Senate.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Alisa Cooper: 17,933
Democratic Party Damon Tyner: 19,919
Republican Party John Amodeo: 25,330 Approveda
Republican Party Chris Brown: 23,440 Approveda

District 3

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • John Burzichelli: 4,815 Approveda Incumbent Burzichelli was first elected to District 3 in 2001.
  • Celeste Riley: 4,599 Approveda Incumbent Riley was first elected to District 3 in 2009.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party John Burzichelli: 25,172 Approveda
Democratic Party Celeste Riley: 23,960 Approveda
Republican Party Domenick DiCicco: 20,268
Republican Party Bob Villare: 20,528

District 4

Note: Incumbent Domenick DiCicco (R) ran for election in District 3.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Paul Moriarty: 4,409 Approveda Incumbent Moriarty was first elected to District 4 in 2005.
  • Gabriela Mosquera: 4,066 Approveda
  • John Caramanna Note: Caramanna was removed from the ballot when his candidacy was found invalid by the Secretary of State's office in late April.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
Independent Independent candidate:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Paul Moriarty: 22,734 Approveda
Democratic Party Gabriela Mosquera: 21,461 Approveda
Republican Party Shelley Lovett: 15,106
Republican Party Patricia Fratticcioli: 14,725
Independent Tony Celeste: 1,843

District 5

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Angel Fuentes: 4,458 Approveda Incumbent Fuentes was first elected to District 5 in 2009.
  • Gilbert Wilson: 4,402 Approveda Incumbent Wilson was first elected to District 5 in 2009.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Angel Fuentes: 17,586 Approveda
Democratic Party Gilbert Wilson: 17,691 Approveda
Republican Party William Levins: 13,575
Republican Party Terrell Ratliff: 12,776

District 6

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Louis Greenwald: 3,558 Approveda Incumbent Greenwald was first elected to District 6 in 1995.
  • Pamela Lampitt: 3,374 Approveda Incumbent Lampitt that was first elected to District 6 in 2005.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Louis Greenwald: 24,272 Approveda
Democratic Party Pamela Lampitt: 23,342 Approveda
Republican Party Allan Richardson: 16,714
Republican Party Greg Horton: 16,461

District 7

Note: Incumbent Jack Conners (D) did not run for re-election.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Herb Conaway: 4,474 Approveda Incumbent Conaway was first elected to District 7 in 1997.
  • Troy Singleton: 4,201 Approveda Conners decided to retire before the end of his term. Candidate Singleton was appointed to fill the seat.[12]
  • Ken Gordon: 1,060 Note: Gordon dropped out of the race in late April.[13]
  • Yvette Sterling: Note: Sterling was removed from the ballot when her candidacy was found invalid by the Secretary of State's office in late April.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Herb Conaway: 23,908 Approveda
Democratic Party Troy Singleton: 23,403 Approveda
Republican Party James Keenan: 22,144
Republican Party Christopher Halgas: 21,828

District 8

Note: Incumbent Patrick Delany (D) did not run for re-election.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
  • Scott Rudder: 4,554 Approveda Incumbent Rudder was first elected to District 8 in 2007.
  • Patrick Delany: 4,407 Approveda Incumbent Delany resigned after winning the Republican primary. Chris Brown was chosen to replace him.
Independent Independent candidate:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Anita Lovely: 12,107
Democratic Party Pam Finnerty: 12,480
Republican Party Scott Rudder: 19,649 Approveda
Republican Party Chris Brown: 19,799 Approveda
Independent Robert Edward Forchion, Jr.: 1,653

District 9

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
  • Brian Rumpf: 6,186 Approveda Incumbent Rumpf was first elected to District 9 in 2003.
  • DiAnne Gove: 6,006 Approveda Incumbent Gove was first elected to District 9 in 2009.

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Carla Kearney: 17,648
Democratic Party Bradley Billhimer: 17,338
Republican Party Brian Rumpf: 30,896 Approveda
Republican Party DiAnne Gove: 29,898 Approveda

District 10

Note: Incumbent James Holzapfel (R) did not run for re-election. He ran for State Senate District 10.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Bette Wary: 16,909
Democratic Party Eli Eytan: 15,698
Republican Party David Wolfe: 27,955 Approveda
Republican Party Gregory McGuckin: 26,831 Approveda

District 11

Note: Incumbent David Rible (R) did not run for re-election in District 11.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
Independent Independent candidate:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Kathleen Horgan: 15,060
Democratic Party Vin Gopal: 15,392
Republican Party Caroline Casagrande: 18,739 Approveda
Republican Party Mary Pat Angelini: 18,479 Approveda
Independent Daniel Jacobson: 2,358

District 12

Note: Incumbents Caroline Casagrande and Declan O'Scanlon, Jr. (R) ran for re-election in different districts. Casagrande ran in District 11 and O'Scanlon ran in District 13.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Catherine Tinney Rome: 14,96
Democratic Party William Spedding: 15,077
Republican Party Ronald Dancer: 22,345 Approveda
Republican Party Robert Clifton: 21,469 Approveda

District 13

Note: Incumbent Samuel Thompson (R) did not run for re-election. He instead ran for Senate District 13.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
Independent Independent candidates:
Constitution Party Constitution party candidates:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Kevin Lavan: 15,165
Democratic Party Patrick Short: 15,333
Republican Party Amy Handlin: 24,073 Approveda
Republican Party Declan O'Scanlon, Jr.: 22,754 Approveda
Constitution Party Frank Cottone: 834
Constitution Party William Lawton: 757

District 14

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Daniel Benson: 3,472 Approveda Incumbent Benson was first elected to District 14 in 2011.
  • Wayne DeAngelo: 3,688 Approveda Incumbent DeAngelo was first elected to District 14 in 2007.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
Green Party Green Party candidate:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Daniel Benson: 25,662 Approveda
Democratic Party Wayne DeAngelo: 26,626 Approveda
Republican Party Sheree McGowan: 19,135
Republican Party Wayne Wittman: 19,100
Green Party Steven Welzer: 1,189

District 15

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Reed Gusciora: 3,593 Approveda Incumbent Gusciora was first elected to District 15 in 1995.
  • Bonnie Watson Coleman: 3,749 Approveda Incumbent Coleman was first elected to District 15 in 1997.
  • Daniel Toto Note: Toto was removed from the ballot after his candidacy was found invalid on April 27, 2011.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Reed Gusciora: 20,350 Approveda
Democratic Party Bonnie Watson Coleman: 20,505 Approveda
Republican Party Peter Yull: 10,817
Republican Party Kathy Kilcommons: 10,914

District 16

Note: Incumbent Denise Coyle (R) initially filed to run for re-election but instead has withdrawn, citing an inability to feasibly move her home into the 16th District after redistricting relocated her residence in a new district.[19]

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Marie Corfield: 17,779
Democratic Party Joe Camarota: 17,795
Republican Party Peter Biondi: 20,359 Approveda
Republican Party Jack Ciattarelli: 19,770 Approveda

District 17

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Joseph Egan: 2,956 Approveda Incumbent Egan was first elected to District 17 in 2001.
  • Upendra Chivukula: 2,918 Approveda Incumbent Chivukula was first elected to District 17 in 2001.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Joseph Egan: 15,165 Approveda
Democratic Party Upendra Chivukula: 14,862 Approveda
Republican Party Carlo Dilalla: 8,627
Republican Party Robert Mettler: 8,876

District 18

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Patrick Diegnan, Jr.: 18,050 Approveda
Democratic Party Peter Barnes, III: 18,166 Approveda
Republican Party Joseph Sinagra: 13,996
Republican Party Marcia Silva: 13,333

District 19

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • John Wisniewski: 5,180 Approveda Incumbent Wisniewski was first elected to District 19 in 1995.
  • Craig Coughlin: 4,833 Approveda Incumbent Coughlin was first elected to District 19 in 2009.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party John Wisniewski: 18,241 Approveda
Democratic Party Craig Coughlin: 17,492 Approveda
Republican Party Angel Leon: 9,008
Republican Party Shane Robinson: 8,915

District 20

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Joseph Cryan: 12,104 Approveda
Democratic Party Annette Quijano: 12,116 Approveda
Republican Party John Donoso: 4,128

District 21

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
  • Nancy Munoz: 4,378 Approveda Incumbent Munoz was first elected to District 21 in 2009.
  • Jon Bramnick: 4,507 Approveda Incumbent Bramnick was first elected to District 21 in 2003.
Libertarian Party Libertarian Party candidate:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Bruce Bergen: 13,878
Democratic Party Norman Albert: 13,864
Republican Party Nancy Munoz: 25,491 Approveda
Republican Party Jon Bramnick: 25,303 Approveda
Libertarian Party Darren Young: 1,324

District 22

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Gerald Green: 5,092 Approveda Incumbent Green was first elected to District 22 in 1991.
  • Linda Stender: 5,411 Approveda Incumbent Stender was first elected to District 22 in 2001.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Gerald Green: 14,957 Approveda
Democratic Party Linda Stender: 15,747 Approveda
Republican Party Joan Van Pelt: 10,846
Republican Party Jeffrey First: 10,092

District 23

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
  • Erik Peterson: 6,201 Approveda Incumbent Peterson was first elected to District 23 in December 2009.
  • John DiMaio: 6,198 Approveda Incumbent DiMaio was first elected to District 23 in February 2009.

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Scott McDonald: 12,420
Democratic Party Karen Carroll: 13,369
Republican Party Erik Peterson: 21,074 Approveda
Republican Party John DiMaio: 21,289 Approveda

District 24

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
  • Alison McHose: 7,234 Approveda Incumbent McHose was first elected to District 24 in 2003.
  • Gary Chiusano: 7,107 Approveda Incumbent Chiusano was first elected to District 24 in 2007.
Independent Independent candidates:
Constitution Party Independent candidates:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Leslie Huhn: 10,290
Democratic Party Jim Nye: 9,832
Republican Party Alison McHose: 19,026 Approveda
Republican Party Gary Chiusano: 18,561 Approveda
Independent Mark Quick: 1,382
Constitution Party Rose Ann Salanitri: 3,161

District 25

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party George Stafford: 12,432
Democratic Party Gale Heiss Colucci: 12,564
Republican Party Anthony Bucco, Jr.: 18,218 Approveda
Republican Party Michael Carroll: 18,481 Approveda

District 26

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
  • Alex DeCroce: 7,079 Approveda Incumbent DeCroce was first elected to District 26 in 1989.
  • Jay Webber: 7,213 Approveda Incumbent Webber was first elected to District 26 in 2007.
  • Joseph Scafa Note: Scafa withdrew from the race in April.
  • Gary Steele Note: Steele was removed from the ballot in late April after the Secretary of State's office found his candidacy invalid.
Green Party Green Party candidate:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Elliot Isibor: 10,319
Democratic Party Joseph Raich: 10,847
Republican Party Alex DeCroce: 19,696 Approveda
Republican Party Jay Webber: 19,543 Approveda
Green Party Michael Spector: 1,095

District 27

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Ellen Steinberg: 2,770
  • Mila Jasey: 6,139 Approveda Incumbent Jasey was first elected to District 27 in 2007.
  • John McKeon: 5,658 Approveda Incumbent McKeon was first elected to District 27 in 2001.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Mila Jasey: 22,757 Approveda
Democratic Party John McKeon: 23,508 Approveda
Republican Party Lee Holtzman: 18,857
Republican Party Nicole Hagner: 18,790

District 28

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Cleopatra Tucker: 14,002 Approveda
Democratic Party Ralph Caputo: 13,786 Approveda
Republican Party Carol Humphreys: 4,607
Republican Party David Pinckney: 4,258

District 29

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • L. Grace Spencer: 4,235 Approveda Incumbent Spencer was first elected to District 29 in 2007.
  • Alberto Coutinho: 4,064 Approveda Incumbent Coutinho was first elected to District 29 in 2007.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party L. Grace Spencer: 8,572 Approveda
Democratic Party Alberto Coutinho: 8,391 Approveda
Republican Party Elaine Guarino: 1,736
Republican Party Lisa Kistner: 1,687

District 30

Note: Incumbent Ronald Dancer (R) ran for re-election in District 12. Incumbent Joseph Malone, III (R) ran for re-election in District 7.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
  • Sean Kean: 3,969 Approveda Incumbent Kean was first elected to Senate District 11 in 2007.
  • David Rible: 3,672 Approveda Incumbent Rible was first elected to Assembly District 11 in 2008. Redistricting moved him from District 11 to the new District 30.[20]
Libertarian Party Libertarian Party candidate:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Howard Kleinhendler: 10,639
Democratic Party Shaun O'Rourke: 11,256
Republican Party Sean Kean: 22,889 Approveda
Republican Party David Rible: 20,728 Approveda
Libertarian Party David Schneck: 986

District 31

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Charles Mainor: 7,358 Approveda Incumbent Mainor was first elected to District 31 in 2009.
  • Jason O'Donnell: 7,396 Approveda Incumbent O'Donnell was first elected to District 31 in 2009.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Charles Mainor: 11,690 Approveda
Democratic Party Jason O'Donnell: 11,877 Approveda
Republican Party Michael Alonso: 3,157
Republican Party Daniel Beckelman: 2,751

District 32

Note: Incumbent Joan Quigley (D) did not run for re-election.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
Independent Independent candidates:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Vincent Prieto: 15,753 Approveda
Democratic Party Angelica Jimenez: 15,211 Approveda
Republican Party Ronald Tarolla: 3,249
Republican Party Michael Bartulovich: 3,443
Independent Saleh Awadalla
Independent April Tricoli-Busset: 498

District 33

Note: Incumbent Caridad Rodriguez (D) did not run for re-election.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Ruben Ramos, Jr.: 17,444 Approveda
Democratic Party Sean Connors: 17,064 Approveda
Republican Party Fernando Uribe: 3,121
Republican Party Christopher Garcia: 3,214

District 34

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Sheila Oliver: 8,049 Approveda Incumbent Oliver was first elected to District 34 in 2003.
  • Thomas Giblin: 7,742 Approveda Incumbent Giblin was first elected to District 34 in 2005.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
Independent Independent candidates:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Sheila Oliver: 15,462 Approveda
Democratic Party Thomas Giblin: 16,285 Approveda
Republican Party Steve Farrell: 4,270
Republican Party Joan Salensky: 4,251
Independent Clenard Childress: 813
Independent David Taylor: 586

District 35

Note: Incumbents Elease Evans (D) and Nellie Pou (D) are not running for re-election.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Shavonda Sumter: 13,143 Approveda
Democratic Party Benjie Wimberly: 13,551 Approveda
Republican Party Donna Puglisi: 5,114
Republican Party James Challice: 5,020

District 36

Note: Incumbent Kevin J. Ryan (D) did not run for re-election.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Gary Schaer: 17,262 Approveda
Democratic Party Marlene Caride: 16,319 Approveda
Republican Party John Genovesi: 11,256
Republican Party Sara Rosengarten: 11,735

District 37

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
Libertarian Party Libertarian Party candidate:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Valerie Vainieri Huttle: 22,062 Approveda
Democratic Party Gordon Johnson: 21,839 Approveda
Republican Party Keith Jensen: 10,150
Republican Party Gregory Aslanian: 9,929
Libertarian Party Julian Heicklen: 675

District 38

Note: Incumbent Joan Voss (D) did not run for re-election.

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
Libertarian Party Libertarian Party candidate:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Connie Terranova Wagner: 22,258 Approveda
Democratic Party Timothy Eustace: 21,097 Approveda
Republican Party Richard Goldberg: 19,091
Republican Party Fernando Alonso: 18,820
Libertarian Party Vinko Grskovic: 707

District 39

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
  • Anthony Iannarelli, Jr.: 109 Note: Iannarelli was removed from the primary ballot, but won the primary as a write-in.
  • Michael McCarthy: 103 Note: McCarthy was removed from the ballot, but won the primary as a write-in.
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:
  • Michael Wilson Note: Wilson was removed from the ballot when his candidacy was found invalid by the Secretary of State's office in late April.
  • Sara Adele Higgins Note: Higgins was removed from the ballot when her candidacy was found invalid by the Secretary of State's office in late April.
  • Charlotte Vandervalk: 3,279 Approveda Incumbent Vandervalk was first elected to District 39 in 1991. After the primary, she decided not to run for re-election. She was replaced by Holly Schepisi.
  • Robert Schroeder: 3,205 Approveda Incumbent Schroeder was first elected to District 39 in 2009.
Independent Independent candidate:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Anthony Iannarelli, Jr.: 15,784
Democratic Party Michael McCarthy: 16,200
Republican Party Holly Schepisi: 26,111 Approveda
Republican Party Robert Schroeder: 26,572 Approveda
Independent Clinton Bosca: 1,425

District 40

Democratic Party June 7 Democratic Primary:
Republican Party June 7 Republican Primary:

November 8 General election candidates:

Democratic Party William Brennan: 13,767
Democratic Party Cassandra Lazzara: 15,412
Republican Party David Russo: 22,125 Approveda
Republican Party Scott Rumana: 21,678 Approveda

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Follow the Money "New Jersey General Assembly 2011 Campaign Contributions"
  2. Wall Street Journal, "New Jersey Breaks Record for Fewest Voters," November 9, 2011
  3. [Confirmed with NJ Elections Division, via phone on November 17, 2010]
  4. 4.0 4.1 The Thicket of State Legislatures, Why do Four States Have Odd-Year Elections?, Aug. 25, 2011
  5. Asbury Park Press, "Race for Legislature is on," September 23, 2011
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 PolitickerNJ, "New Jersey Legislative Forecast," November 1, 2011
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 NJ Spotlight, "Election 2011: Where the Republicans Can Pick Up Assembly Seats," April 12, 2011
  8. The Republic, "Christie: NJ GOP won't lose any legislative seats to Democrats in upcoming midterm elections," November 1, 2011
  9. New Jersey Secretary of State "Partisan Office Candidate Requirements
  10. New Jersey Secretary of State "Memo to General Assembly and Senate Candidates on Criminal Disclosure", April 8, 2005
  11. New Jersey ELEC, "News Release," November 3, 2011
  12. Courier Post Online, "Singleton to fill Conners' seat," September 14, 2011
  13. Burlington County Times, "Gordon no longer pursuing Assembly," April 26, 2011
  14. Register-News, "Redistricting moves Malone from 30th to 7th District," April 6, 2011
  15. Philly.com, "Malone says his departure had nothing to do with redistricting," June 15, 2011
  16. The Messenger-Press, "ROBBINSVILLE: Mayor Fried mulling Assembly bid," April 5, 2011
  17. Freehold Patch, "New Map Moves Freehold Into Redrawn 11th District," April 4, 2011
  18. NJ.com, "Sheree McGowan aims for Dave Fried's spot on GOP ticket in 14th District Assembly race," August 17, 2011
  19. Basking Ridge Patch "Denise Coyle Explains Decision to Retire From NJ Assembly," April 16, 2011
  20. Eatontown-Tinton Falls Patch, "Kean Will Seek Assembly Seat in 30th District," April 6, 2011