Difference between revisions of "New Jersey school districts"

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(Enrollment)
Line 52: Line 52:
 
===Demographics===
 
===Demographics===
 
{{Education k-12 ethnicity New Jersey}}
 
{{Education k-12 ethnicity New Jersey}}
 +
 +
==In the news==
 +
===Newark Superintendent Cami Anderson===
 +
Since 1995, the [[New Jersey]] state government has exercised control over [[Newark Public Schools, New Jersey|Newark Public Schools]]. In 2013, the Newark Students Union led two mass boycotts against state control of the district in April and November, with the April walkout reportedly drawing about 1,000 students.<ref>[http://stream.aljazeera.com/story/201304102124-0022669 ''Al Jazeera,'' "Newark students walkout over cut backs," April 10, 2013]</ref><ref>[http://teacherunderconstruction.com/2013/11/01/newark-students-organize-boycott-demand-local-control-of-schools/ ''Teacher Under Construction,'' "Newark Students Organize Boycott, Demand Local Control of Schools," November 1, 2013]</ref> Superintendent Cami Anderson, who was appointed by [[New Jersey Governor|Governor]] [[Chris Christie]], has put forward a controversial district reform plan labeled "One Newark" that includes school closures, teacher layoffs, Teach for America hirings and changes to the district's enrollment system for both traditional and charter schools.<ref>[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2014/02/27/gov-christies-new-crisis-protests-grow-over-state-control-of-newark-schools/ ''The Washington Post'', "Gov. Christie’s new crisis: Protests grow over state control of Newark schools," February 27, 2014]</ref> American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten sent a letter to Governor Christie criticizing Superintendent Anderson's plan to use teacher performance evaluations instead of seniority in deciding which teachers to layoff. She concluded the letter by arguing that the state should relinquish control of the school district.<ref>[http://www.aft.org/newspubs/press/ltr_randi-govchristie022614.cfm ''American Federation of Teachers,'' "Letter from Randi Weingarten to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on the school crisis in Newark," February 26, 2014]</ref><ref>[http://www.nj.com/education/2014/02/newark_schools_chief_warns_of_massive_teacher_layoffs_wants_pink_slips_pegged_to_performance.html ''The Star-Ledger,'' "Newark schools chief warns of massive teacher layoffs; wants pink slips tied to performance," February 25, 2014]</ref>
 +
 +
In May 2014, Anderson publicly rejected calls for her resignation and objections to her reforms in an interview with NJTV.<ref>[http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/District_Dossier/2014/06/despite_criticisms_and_calls_f.html ''Education Week,'' "Despite Calls for Resignation, Newark Superintendent Vows to Stay," June 2, 2014]</ref> In the interview, she stated, "I’m an optimist and I believe our kids deserve us to keep them at the core of every decision and I believe so strongly that we can do what we need to do for our kids that I am absolutely committed to staying the course and putting kids at the core of every decision."<ref>[http://www.njtvonline.org/news/video/in-njtv-exclusive-cami-anderson-says-she-plans-to-stay-on-in-newark/#.U4e_6amEPtA.twitter ''NJTV News,'' "In NJTV Exclusive, Cami Anderson Says She Plans to Stay on in Newark," May 29, 2014]</ref> She received a three-year contract extension from the Christie administration on June 27, 2014.<ref name=andersoncontract>[http://www.nj.com/education/2014/06/nj_officials_renew_contract_of_embattled_newark_schools_chief.html ''The Star-Ledger,'' "NJ officials renew contract of embattled Newark schools chief," June 27, 2014]</ref>
 +
 +
Superintendent Anderson's relationship with the Newark Advisory Board has also grown increasingly contentious. During a January 2014 board meeting with hundreds of parents, residents and district educators in attendance, Superintendent Anderson was heckled continuously by the crowd. AFT President Randi Weingarten also attended to denounce Superintendent Anderson's reform proposals, encouraging the opposition in the crowd by pledging AFT's support and stating, "the nation is watching Newark."<ref>[http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/14/01/29/raucous-newark-crowd-drives-superintendent-from-school-board-meeting/ ''NJ Spotlight,'' "Raucous Newark Crowd Drives Superintendent From School Board Meeting," January 29, 2014]</ref> Superintendent Anderson and her staff left the meeting after community activist Natasha Allen allegedly referred to the superintendent's biracial child by asking, "Do you not want for our brown babies what you want for your brown baby?"<ref>[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/29/cami-anderson-brown-baby_n_4689361.html ''The Huffington Post,'' "Newark School Chief Cami Anderson Ditches Rowdy Meeting After Remarks About Her ‘Brown Baby'," January 30, 2014]</ref> In February 2014, Superintendent Anderson announced that she will no longer attend board meetings on the basis that they "are no longer focused on achieving educational outcomes for children."<ref name=nomeetings>[http://www.nj.com/education/2014/02/cami_anderson_newark_schools_superintendent_at_loggerheads_with_school_board.html ''The Star-Ledger,'' "Cami Anderson, Newark schools superintendent, at loggerheads with school board," February 27, 2014]</ref>
  
 
==School board elections==
 
==School board elections==

Revision as of 09:39, 9 July 2014

K-12 Education in New Jersey
Flag of New Jersey.png
Education facts
State Superintendent: David Hespe
Number of students: 1,356,431[1]
Number of teachers: 109,719
Teacher/pupil ratio: 1:12.4
Number of school districts: 700
Number of schools: 2,596
Graduation rate: 86%[2]
Per-pupil spending: $15,968[3]
See also
New Jersey Department of EducationNew Jersey school districtsList of school districts in New JerseyNew JerseySchool boards portal
Policypedia
Education policy logo.jpg
Education policy project
Public education in the United States
Public education in New Jersey
Glossary of education terms

New Jersey is home to 700 school districts, 2,596 schools and 1,356,431 K-12 students.[4][5]

Quick facts

State school administrators

  • State Board of Education[6]
    • Arcelio Aponte, President
    • Joseph Fisicaro, Vice President
    • Mark W. Biedron
    • Ronald K. Butcher
    • Claire Chamberlain
    • Jack Fornaro
    • Edithe Fulton
    • Ernest P. Lepore
    • Andrew J. Mulvihill
    • J. Peter Simon
    • Dr. Dorothy S. Strickland
    • Vacant
    • Vacant

Statistics

The following table displays the state's top 10 school districts by total student enrollment.

Student enrollment
1.) Newark
2.) Jersey City
3.) Paterson
4.) Elizabeth
5.) Toms River Regional
6.) Edison Township
7.) Passaic
8.) Woodbridge Township
9.) Camden City
10.) Hamilton Township

Demographics

See also: Demographic information for all students in all 50 states

The following table displays the ethnic distribution of students in New Jersey as reported in the National Center for Education Statistics Common Core of Data for 2011-2012.[7]

Demographic Information for New Jersey's K-12 Public School System
Ethnicity Students State Percentage United States Percentage**
American Indian 1,735 0.13% 1.10%
Asian 121,434 8.95% 4.68%
African American 220,238 16.24% 15.68%
Hawaiian Nat./Pacific Isl. Students 3,153 0.23% 0.42%
Hispanic 305,026 22.49% 24.37%
White 693,416 51.12% 51.21%
Two or More 11,429 0.84% 2.54%
**Note: This is the percentage of all students in the United States that are reported to be of this ethnicity.

In the news

Newark Superintendent Cami Anderson

Since 1995, the New Jersey state government has exercised control over Newark Public Schools. In 2013, the Newark Students Union led two mass boycotts against state control of the district in April and November, with the April walkout reportedly drawing about 1,000 students.[8][9] Superintendent Cami Anderson, who was appointed by Governor Chris Christie, has put forward a controversial district reform plan labeled "One Newark" that includes school closures, teacher layoffs, Teach for America hirings and changes to the district's enrollment system for both traditional and charter schools.[10] American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten sent a letter to Governor Christie criticizing Superintendent Anderson's plan to use teacher performance evaluations instead of seniority in deciding which teachers to layoff. She concluded the letter by arguing that the state should relinquish control of the school district.[11][12]

In May 2014, Anderson publicly rejected calls for her resignation and objections to her reforms in an interview with NJTV.[13] In the interview, she stated, "I’m an optimist and I believe our kids deserve us to keep them at the core of every decision and I believe so strongly that we can do what we need to do for our kids that I am absolutely committed to staying the course and putting kids at the core of every decision."[14] She received a three-year contract extension from the Christie administration on June 27, 2014.[15]

Superintendent Anderson's relationship with the Newark Advisory Board has also grown increasingly contentious. During a January 2014 board meeting with hundreds of parents, residents and district educators in attendance, Superintendent Anderson was heckled continuously by the crowd. AFT President Randi Weingarten also attended to denounce Superintendent Anderson's reform proposals, encouraging the opposition in the crowd by pledging AFT's support and stating, "the nation is watching Newark."[16] Superintendent Anderson and her staff left the meeting after community activist Natasha Allen allegedly referred to the superintendent's biracial child by asking, "Do you not want for our brown babies what you want for your brown baby?"[17] In February 2014, Superintendent Anderson announced that she will no longer attend board meetings on the basis that they "are no longer focused on achieving educational outcomes for children."[18]

School board elections

Upcoming elections

See also: New Jersey school board elections, 2014

A total of 19 New Jersey school districts among America's largest school districts by enrollment held elections in 2014 for 59 seats. Three board elections were held on April 23, 2014, while 16 districts held elections on November 4, 2014.

Here are several quick facts about New Jersey's school board elections in 2014:

The districts listed below served 281,334 K-12 students during the 2010-2011 school year, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.[19] Click on the district names for more information on the district and its school board elections.

2014 New Jersey School Board Elections
District Date Seats up for election Total board seats Student enrollment
Edison Township Public Schools 4/23/2014 3 9 14,178
Newark Public Schools 4/23/2014 3 9 33,862
Passaic Public Schools 4/23/2014 3 9 13,281
Brick Township Public Schools 11/4/2014 2 7 9,851
Cherry Hill Public Schools 11/4/2014 3 9 11,356
Clifton Public Schools 11/4/2014 3 9 10,905
Elizabeth Public Schools 11/4/2014 3 9 22,737
Freehold Regional High School District 11/4/2014 3 9 11,864
Hamilton Township School District 11/4/2014 3 9 12,558
Jackson School District 11/4/2014 2 7 9,584
Jersey City Public Schools 11/4/2014 3 9 27,657
Middletown Township School District 11/4/2014 3 9 10,083
Old Bridge Township Public Schools 11/4/2014 3 9 9,403
Paterson Public Schools 11/4/2014 4 9 24,383
Perth Amboy Public Schools 11/4/2014 3 9 10,468
Toms River Regional Schools 11/4/2014 3 9 16,762
Vineland Public Schools 11/4/2014 3 9 9,594
West Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School District 11/4/2014 5 9 9,780
Woodbridge Township School District 11/4/2014 4 9 13,028


See also

External links

BP-Initials-UPDATED.png
Suggest a link

References

  1. National Center for Education Statistics, "Table 2. Number of operating public schools and districts, state enrollment, teacher and pupil/teacher ratio by state: School year 2011–12," accessed March 18, 2014
  2. ED Data Express, "State Tables Report," accessed March 17, 2014 The site includes this disclaimer: "States converted to an adjusted cohort graduation rate [starting in the 2010-2011 school year], which may or may not be the same as the calculation they used in prior years. Due to the potential differences, caution should be used when comparing graduation rates across states."
  3. United States Census Bureau, "Public Education Finances: 2011," accessed March 18, 2014
  4. State of New Jersey Department of Education, "New Jersey Public Schools Fact Sheet," accessed August 8, 2013
  5. State of New Jersey Department of Education, "2012-2013 Enrollment," accessed August 8, 2013
  6. State of New Jersey Department of Education, "New Jersey State Board of Education Members," accessed June 13, 2014
  7. United States Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, "Common Core of Data (CCD), State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey, 2011-2012," accessed May 7, 2014
  8. Al Jazeera, "Newark students walkout over cut backs," April 10, 2013
  9. Teacher Under Construction, "Newark Students Organize Boycott, Demand Local Control of Schools," November 1, 2013
  10. The Washington Post, "Gov. Christie’s new crisis: Protests grow over state control of Newark schools," February 27, 2014
  11. American Federation of Teachers, "Letter from Randi Weingarten to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on the school crisis in Newark," February 26, 2014
  12. The Star-Ledger, "Newark schools chief warns of massive teacher layoffs; wants pink slips tied to performance," February 25, 2014
  13. Education Week, "Despite Calls for Resignation, Newark Superintendent Vows to Stay," June 2, 2014
  14. NJTV News, "In NJTV Exclusive, Cami Anderson Says She Plans to Stay on in Newark," May 29, 2014
  15. The Star-Ledger, "NJ officials renew contract of embattled Newark schools chief," June 27, 2014
  16. NJ Spotlight, "Raucous Newark Crowd Drives Superintendent From School Board Meeting," January 29, 2014
  17. The Huffington Post, "Newark School Chief Cami Anderson Ditches Rowdy Meeting After Remarks About Her ‘Brown Baby'," January 30, 2014
  18. The Star-Ledger, "Cami Anderson, Newark schools superintendent, at loggerheads with school board," February 27, 2014
  19. National Center for Education Statistics, "Elementary/Secondary Information System," accessed March 21, 2014