Difference between revisions of "New Mexico State Legislature"

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[[File:New Mexico legislature pie chart 1992-2013.png|thumb|Partisan breakdown of the New Mexico legislature from 1992-2013]]
 
[[File:New Mexico legislature pie chart 1992-2013.png|thumb|Partisan breakdown of the New Mexico legislature from 1992-2013]]
 
'''New Mexico State Senate:'''
 
'''New Mexico State Senate:'''
During every year from 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the New Mexico State Senate. The New Mexico State Senate is one of 16 state senates that was Democratic for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013.
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During every year from 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the New Mexico State Senate. The New Mexico State Senate is 1 of 16 state senates that was Democratic for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013.
  
 
Across the country, there were 541 Democratic and 517 Republican state senates from 1992 to 2013.
 
Across the country, there were 541 Democratic and 517 Republican state senates from 1992 to 2013.

Revision as of 22:38, 28 August 2013

New Mexico State Legislature

Seal of New Mexico.gif
General Information
Type:   State legislature
Term limits:   None
2014 session start:   January 15, 2013
Website:   Official Legislature Page
Leadership
Senate President:   John A. Sanchez (R)
House Speaker:  Ben Lujan, Sr. (D)
Majority Leader:   Michael Sanchez (D) (Senate),
W. Ken Martinez (D) (House)
Minority leader:   Stuart Ingle (R) (Senate),
Thomas Taylor (R) (House)
Structure
Members:  42 (Senate), 70 (House)
Length of term:   4 years (Senate), 2 years (House)
Authority:   Art IV, Section 3, New Mexico Constitution
Salary:   $0/year + per diem
Elections
Last Election:  November 6, 2012
42 seats (Senate)
70 seats (House)
Next election:  November 4, 2014
Redistricting:  New Mexico Legislature has control
The New Mexico Legislature is the legislative branch of New Mexico. It is a bicameral body made up of the New Mexico House of Representatives and the New Mexico Senate.

The legislature consists of 70 representatives and 42 senators. Each member of the House represents roughly 25,980 residents of New Mexico. Each member of the Senate represents roughly 43,300 residents.

As of July 2014, New Mexico is one of 14 states that is under divided government and is therefore not one of the state government trifectas.

Sessions

Article IV of the New Mexico Constitution establishes when the Legislature is to be in session. Section 5 of Article IV states that the Legislature is to convene its annual regular session on the third Tuesday of January. In odd-numbered years, the Legislature is to be in session for no longer than sixty days. In even-numbered years, the Legislature is to be in session for no longer than thirty days. In even-numbered years, the Legislature is limited to dealing with budgetary matters, bills that deal with issues raised by special messages of the Governor of New Mexico, and bills vetoed in the previous session by the Governor.

Section 6 of Article IV allows the Governor of New Mexico to call special sessions of the Legislature. Section 6 also allows the Legislature to meet in special session when three-fifths of each house petition the Governor with a request for a special session. Special sessions are not to exceed thirty days in length.

2013

See also: Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions

In 2013, the Legislature was in session from January 15 to March 16.

Major issues

Major issues in the 2013 legislative session included education, solvency of the state's public retirement system, tax cuts for state businesses, and tougher anti-DWI laws.[1]

2012

See also: Dates of 2012 state legislative sessions

In 2012, the Legislature was in session from January 17 through February 16.

Major issues

In their 30-day session the legislature considered drivers licenses for illegal immigrants, voter identification, business income tax, ethics reform, and defining homeowner rights in foreclosure proceedings.[2]

Gov. Susana Martinez (R) watched as the state legislature ended its session by rejecting a bill that would have repealed the law allowing drivers licenses to be issued to people without Social Security numbers. It was the third time she has tried to undo the law. The bill was initially passed by the House but defeated in the Senate. The Senate instead passed a measure shortening how long the licenses are valid and imposing harsher penalties on those committing fraud.[3]

2011

In 2011, the Legislature was in session from January 18 through March 19. [4] As of late July, a special session will be scheduled for early September, however, a date has not been confirmed by Governor Susana Martinez. As of late July, issues on the agenda include:[5]

  • Fireworks use and sale ban in very dry years
  • A measure giving in-state companies an advantage when bidding for contracts
  • A ban on issuing driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants

The 45 calendar days that the New Mexico Legislature was in session during 2011 is tied with Utah, Wyoming, and Arkansas for the shortest legislative session in the country.[6]

2010

In 2010, the Legislature was in regular session from January 19 to February 18. Additionally, the Senate convened a special session from March 1 to March 4.[7]

Ethics and transparency

Open States Transparency

See also: Open States' Legislative Data Report Card

The Sunlight Foundation released an "Open Legislative Data Report Card" in March 2013. New Mexico was given a grade of C in the report. The report card evaluated how adequate, complete and accessible legislative data is to the general public. A total of 10 states received an A -- Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Kansas, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia and Washington.[8]

Senate

The New Mexico Senate is the upper house of the New Mexico State Legislature. There are 42 members of the Senate. Each member represents an average of 49,028 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[9] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 43,311.[10] All 42 seats are up for election every four years, and the next election will be in 2008.


Party As of July 2014
     Democratic Party 25
     Republican Party 17
Total 42


The chart below shows the partisan composition of the New Mexico State Senate from 1992-2013.
Partisan composition of the New Mexico State Senate.PNG

House of Representatives

The New Mexico House of Representatives is the lower house of the New Mexico State Legislature. There are 70 members of the House. Each member represents an average of 29,417 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[11] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 25,986.[12]

Party As of July 2014
     Democratic Party 37
     Republican Party 33
Total 70


The chart below shows the partisan composition of the New Mexico State House of Representatives from 1992-2013.
Partisan composition of the New Mexico State House.PNG

History

Partisan balance 1992-2013

Who Runs the States Project
See also: Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States and Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States, New Mexico’’
Partisan breakdown of the New Mexico legislature from 1992-2013

New Mexico State Senate: During every year from 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the New Mexico State Senate. The New Mexico State Senate is 1 of 16 state senates that was Democratic for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013.

Across the country, there were 541 Democratic and 517 Republican state senates from 1992 to 2013.

New Mexico State House of Representatives: During every year from 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the New Mexico State House of Representatives. The New Mexico State House of Representatives is one of 18 state Houses that was Democratic for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013.

Across the country, there were 577 Democratic and 483 Republican State Houses of Representatives from 1992 to 2013.

Over the course of the 22-year study, state governments became increasingly more partisan. At the outset of the study period (1992), 18 of the 49 states with partisan legislatures had single-party trifectas and 31 states had divided governments. In 2013, only 13 states have divided governments, while single-party trifectas held sway in 36 states, the most in the 22 years studied.

The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Office of the Governor of New Mexico, the New Mexico State Senate and the New Mexico House of Representatives from 1992-2013. Partisan composition of New Mexico state government(1992-2013).PNG

Redistricting

See also: Redistricting in New Mexico

The New Mexico Legislature is responsible for redistricting. In 2011, it formed an 18-member interim redistricting committee to make recommendations for the actual redistricting process in the Legislature.

2010 census

New Mexico received its local census data on March 15, 2011. The state grew 13.2 percent from 2000 to 2010, with notable growth in its most populous cities; Albuquerque grew by 21.7 percent, Las Cruces grew by 31.4 percent, Rio Rancho grew by 69.1 percent, Santa Fe grew by 9.2 percent, and Roswell grew by 6.8 percent.[13]

At the time of redistricting, Democrats controlled the Legislature while the Governor, Susana Martinez was a Republican. The interim committee reviewed eight House maps and nine Senate maps before the special redistricting session of the Legislature began on September 6, 2011. On September 21, the Senate passed a map on party lines, with the House following the next day. Gov. Martinez vetoed the maps on October 7, leaving a court to resolve the process. By the time new maps were passed, $8 million had been spent.[14]

Legislators

Salaries

See also: Comparison of state legislative salaries

As of 2013, members of the New Mexico Legislature are not paid a salary. Per diem is $154/day tied to the federal rate.[15]

When sworn in

See also: When state legislators assume office after a general election

New Mexico legislators assume office January 1st.

Constitutional amendments

The New Mexico legislature has the authority to vote to place proposed constitutional amendments to the New Mexico Constitution on the statewide ballot for approval or rejection by the state's voters. There are five such legislative referrals on the November 4, 2008 ballot in the state.

External links

References