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New Mexico lieutenant gubernatorial election, 2010

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Breaking news

The New Mexico lieutenant gubernatorial election of 2010 was held on November 2, 2010. Primary elections were held June 1, 2010. February 10, 2010 was the deadline for filing nomination papers.[1] Voter registration for the general election ended October 5, 2010 at close of business. On all election days, polls were open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm, local time.

The Democrats nominated Brian S. Colón to face John A. Sanchez, winner of the Republican primary.

New Mexico, like 20 states, elects the lt. governor and governor on a shared ticket. Incumbent Lt. Governor Diane Denish was the Democratic nominee for governor, meaning the lt. governor's race was an open seat in 2010.


The November Ballot – Who Made It? New Mexico Lieutenant Governor[2]
Nominee Affiliation
Brian S. Colón Democrat
John A. Sanchez Republican
This lists candidates who won their state's primary or convention, or who were unopposed, and who were officially certified for the November ballot by their state's election authority.

November 2, 2010 general election results

As of November 12, 2010, 100% of precincts had reported.

2010 New Mexico lieutenant gubernatorial general election
Party Candidate Vote Percentage
     Democratic Party Brian S. Colón 46.41%
     Republican Party Approveda John A. Sanchez 53.59%
Total Votes 592,313

Candidates

In New Mexico, major party candidates may be certified at their party's convention if they receive at least 20% of the vote. Certified candidates are placed first on primary ballots. Candidates who fail to win certification may still collect signatures and petition onto the primary ballot.

Democrat

Jose Campos, Brian Colon, and Jerry Pino were all certified by the New Mexico Democratic Party on March 13, 2010, at their "Pre-Primary" convention in Pojoquae.[3]

Republican

Three of four Republican candidates were certified at the New Mexico GOP convention, held March 13, 2010. Following his convention loss, Mr. Damon did not successfully petition onto the ballot and, as such, only three candidates appeared on the primary ballot.

June 1, 2010 primary

2010 Race for Lieutenant Governor - Democrat Primary[4]
Candidates Percentage
Jose A. "Joe" Campos (D) 20.41%
Green check mark.jpg Brian S. Colón (D) 28.67%
Linda M. López (D) 14.57%
Gerald P. "Jerry" Ortiz y Pino (D) 11.97%
Lawrence D. Rael (D) 24.39%
Total votes 126,179
2010 Race for Lieutenant Governor - Republican Primary[5]
Candidates Percentage
Kent L. Cravens (R) 29.13%
Brian K. Moore (R) 31.23%
Green check mark.jpg John A. Sanchez (R) 39.71%
Total votes 116,374

March 2010 party convention certification votes

2010 Race for Lieutenant Governor - Democrat Pre-Primary Convention[6]
Candidates Percentage
Gerald P. "Jerry" Ortiz y Pino (D) 18.87%
Green check mark.jpg Jose A. "Joe" Campos (D)) 19.69%
Green check mark.jpg Brian S. Colón (D) 34.54%
Linda M. López (D) 4.73%
Green check mark.jpg Lawrence D. Rael (D) 22.15%
Total votes 1,711

Jose Campos was initially not certified, due to being two-tenths of a percentage point away from meeting the 20% threshold. However, the New Mexico Democratic Party began a recount the day after the convention and ultimately ruled that, by the party's own rules, 19.69% should have been rounded to 20%, certifying Mr. Campos to the ballot.


2010 Race for Lieutenant Governor - Republican Pre-Primary Convention[7]
Candidates Percentage
Green check mark.jpg Brian K. Moore (R) 41.24%
Green check mark.jpg Kent L. Cravens (R) 27.64%
Green check mark.jpg John Sanchez (R)' 22.81%
J.R. Damon (R) 8.29%
Total votes '


See also

External links

Campaign sites

Democratic

Republican


References