North Carolina Taxpayer Bill of Rights Amendment (2012)

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Not on Ballot
Proposed allot measures that were not on a ballot
This measure did not or
will not appear on a ballot
North Carolina Constitution
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Preamble
Articles
IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXIXIIXIIIXIV
A North Carolina Taxpayer Bill of Rights Amendment did not make the November 2012 ballot in North Carolina as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. The measure would have established an expenditure limit based on population growth plus inflation. A 2/3rd majority vote of the North Carolina General Assembly would be required to to exceed the limit.[1] Additionally, the proposed measure would establish a reserve trust fund.[2]

The bill was sponsored by Reps. John Blust, Ric Killian, Bryan Holloway and Nelson Dollar.

Text of measure

If referred to the ballot, voters would be asked:[2]

Constitutional amendment to limit the General Fund expenditures for each fiscal year to an amount that does not exceed the previous year's General Fund expenditure limit increased by a percentage rate that equals the fiscal growth factor and to provide that the base fiscal year for the General Fund expenditure limit shall be the total authorized General Fund budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2012, increased by the fiscal growth factor. That baseline shall be used to determine the General Fund expenditure limit for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2013, which will then be used to determine the General Fund expenditure limit for succeeding fiscal years.

Path to the ballot

See also: Amending the North Carolina Constitution

The North Carolina Constitution, Section 4 of Article XIII, requires that a legislatively-referred amendment go on the ballot after it is approved by a 60% vote of each house of the North Carolina State Legislature.

See also

Similar measures

Articles

External links

Additional reading

References