North Dakota Legislative Assembly

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North Dakota Legislative Assembly

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General Information
Type:   State legislature
Term limits:   None
2014 session start:   January 8, 2013
Website:   Official Legislature Page
Leadership
Senate President:   Drew Wrigley (R)
House Speaker:  William Devlin (R)
Majority Leader:   Rich Wardner (R) (Senate),
Al Carlson (R) (House)
Minority leader:   Mac Schneider (D) (Senate),
Kenton Onstad (D) (House)
Structure
Members:  47 (Senate), 94 (House)
Length of term:   4 years (Senate), 4 years (House)
Authority:   Art IV, North Dakota Constitution
Salary:   $152/day + per diem
Elections
Last Election:  November 6, 2012
23 seats (Senate)
47 seats (House)
Next election:  November 4, 2014
Redistricting:  North Dakota Legislature has control
The North Dakota Legislative Assembly is the state legislature of North Dakota. The Legislative Assembly consists of two bodies, the lower North Dakota House of Representatives and the upper North Dakota Senate. A Legislative Council and its research, administrative and support staff also assist the Legislative Assembly in its day-to-day activities.

The Legislative Assembly convenes within the 19-story Art Deco state capitol building in Bismarck.

Because the House and Senate sit for only 80 days in odd-numbered years, the Legislative Council oversees legislative affairs in the interim periods, doing longer-term studies of issues, and drafting legislation for consideration of both houses at the next session.

As of October 2014, North Dakota is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas.

Sessions

Article IV of the North Dakota Constitution establishes when the Assembly is to be in session. Section 7 of Article IV states that the Assembly is to convene in regular session every January after a legislative election. This means that the Assembly convenes in January of every odd-numbered year. Section 7 specifies that the convening date is to be the first Tuesday after the third day in January, unless this date is changed by law. Section 7 limits the length of regular sessions to no more than eighty days every two years.

2014

See also: Dates of 2014 state legislative sessions

In 2014, the Legislature will not hold a regular session.

2013

See also: Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions

In 2013, the Legislature was in session from January 8 through May 6.

Major issues

Major issues in the 2013 legislative session were focused mostly on the oil boom in western North Dakota and included a budget, the state surplus, improved transportation infrastructure, and decreasing crime.[1]

2012

See also: Dates of 2012 state legislative sessions

In 2012, the Legislature was not in regular session.

2011

See also: Dates of 2011 state legislative sessions

In 2011, the Legislative Assembly was in regular session from January 4 through April 28. [2] A special session has been called by Governor Jack Dalrymple for November 7 through 12 to cover legislative redistricting and disaster relief.[3]

Interim Committees

On May 25, 2011 the Legislative Management Committee appointed members to the state's interim committees. Historically, majority and minority members of the Legislative Management Committee are appointed as chairs of the interim committees. However in 2011, only Republican legislators were appointed to chair interim committees. House Minority Leader Jerome Kelsh (D) called the move partisan and a "break with tradition." House Majority Leader Al Carlson (D) argued that the appointments reflected wishes of voters in electing Republican candidates. Regardless of the particular committee chair, Republicans will be a majority on all committees. Only a few states permit minority committee chairs.[4]

2010

See also: Dates of 2010 state legislative sessions

In 2010, the Legislative Assembly did not meet in regular session.[5]

Ethics and transparency

Open States Transparency

See also: Open States' Legislative Data Report Card

The Sunlight Foundation released an "Open Legislative Data Report Card" in March 2013. North Dakota was given a grade of C in the report. The report card evaluated how adequate, complete and accessible legislative data is to the general public. A total of 10 states received an A -- Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Kansas, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia and Washington.[6]

Senate

The North Dakota State Senate is the upper house of the North Dakota Legislative Assembly.

North Dakota is divided into between 40 and 54 legislative districts apportioned by population as determined by the decennial census. The 2000 redistricting plan provided for 47 districts. As each district elects 1 representative to the Senate, there are 47 Senators. Each member represents an average of 14,310 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[7] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 13,664.[8]

Senators serve 4-year terms. Elections are staggered such that half the districts have elections every 2 years.

Party As of October 2014
     Democratic Party 14
     Republican Party 33
Total 47


The chart below shows the partisan composition of the North Dakota State Senate from 1992-2013.
Partisan composition of the North Dakota State Senate.PNG

House of Representatives

The North Dakota House of Representatives is the lower house of the North Dakota Legislative Assembly. Each of North Dakota's 47 districts elects 2 Representatives to the House, for a total of 94 Representatives. Each member represents an average of 7,155 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[9] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 6,832.[10]

Representatives serve 4-year terms. Elections are staggered such that half the districts have elections every 2 years.


Party As of October 2014
     Democratic Party 23
     Republican Party 70
     Vacancy 1
Total 94

The chart below shows the partisan composition of the North Dakota State House of Representatives from 1992-2013.
Partisan composition of the North Dakota State House.PNG

History

Partisan balance 1992-2013

Who Runs the States Project
See also: Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States and Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States, North Dakota’’
Partisan breakdown of the North Dakota legislature from 1992-2013

North Dakota State Senate: From 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the North Dakota State Senate for the first three years while the Republicans were the majority for the last 19 years. The North Dakota State Senate is one of 13 state senates that was Republican for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013. North Dakota was under Republican trifectas for the last 19 years.

Across the country, there were 541 Democratic and 517 Republican state senates from 1992 to 2013.

North Dakota State House of Representatives: During every year from 1992-2013, the Republican Party was the majority in the North Dakota State House of Representatives. The North Dakota House of Representatives is one of nine state Houses that was Republican for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013. North Dakota has been under Republican trifectas for the last 19 years.

Across the country, there were 577 Democratic and 483 Republican State Houses of Representatives from 1992 to 2013.

Over the course of the 22-year study, state governments became increasingly more partisan. At the outset of the study period (1992), 18 of the 49 states with partisan legislatures had single-party trifectas and 31 states had divided governments. In 2013, only 13 states have divided governments, while single-party trifectas held sway in 36 states, the most in the 22 years studied.

The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Office of the Governor of North Dakota, the North Dakota State Senate and the North Dakota House of Representatives from 1992-2013. Partisan composition of North Dakota state government(1992-2013).PNG

Committees

There no permanent joint committees in the North Dakota Legislative Assembly. However, the state does appoint joint interim committees.

Legislators

Salaries

See also: Comparison of state legislative salaries

As of 2013, members of the North Dakota Legislature are paid $152/day during legislative sessions and for attending interim committee meetings. Legislators receive lodging reimbursements up to $1,351/month (vouchered).[11]

Pension

North Dakota does not provide pensions for legislators.[12]

When sworn in

See also: When state legislators assume office after a general election

North Dakota legislators assume office December 1st.

External links

References