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Ohio Biennial Elections Amendment (1905)

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IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXIXIIXIIIXIVXVXVIXVIIXVIIISchedule

The Ohio Biennial Elections Amendment, also known as Issue 1, was on the November 7, 1905 ballot in Ohio as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was approved. This amendment modified the Ohio Constitution in relation to biennial elections.[1]

Election results

Ohio Amendment 1 (1905)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 702,699 88.56%
No90,76211.44%

Note: A majority of the total 961,505 votes in the entire election (480,753 votes) were needed for the measure to be approved

Election results via: Ohio Secretary of State (1905) (p. 156 & 461)

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot:

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Biennial Elections Amendment to be designated 'Article XVII'[1]

Constitutional changes

ARTICLE XVII

Section 1. Elections for state and county officers shall be held on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November in the even numbered years; and all elections for all other elective officers shall be held on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in the odd numbered years.

Sections 2. The term of office of the governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, secretary of state and treasurer of state shall be two years, and that of the auditor of state shall be four years. The term of office of the judges of the supreme court and circuit courts shall be such even number of years not less than six (6) years as may be prescribed by the general assembly; that of the judges of the common pleas court six (6) years and of the judges of the probate court, four (4) years, and that of other judges shall be such even number of years not exceeding six (6) years as may be prescribed by the general assembly. The term of office of justices of the peace shall be such even number of years not exceeding four (4) years as may be prescribed by the general assembly. The term of office of the members of the board of public works shall be such even number of years not exceeding six (6) years as may be so prescribed; and the term of office of all elective county, township, municipal and school officers shall be such even number of years not exceeding four (4) years as may be so prescribed.

And the general assembly shall have power to so extend existing terms of offices as to effect the purpose of section I of this article.

Any vacancy which may occur in any elective state office other than that of a member of the general assembly or of governor, shall be filled by appointment by the governor until the disability Is removed or a successor elected and qualified. Every such vacancy shall be filled by election at the first general election for the office which is vacant, that occurs more than thirty (30) days after the vacancy shall have occurred. The person elected shall fill the office for the unexpired term. All vacancies in other elective offices shall be filled for the unexpired term in such manner as may be prescribed by law.

Section 3. Every elective officer holding office when this amendment is adopted shall continue to hold such office for the full term for which he was elected and until his successor shall be elected and qualified as provided by law.[1]

Path to the ballot

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