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Difference between revisions of "On The Issues Vote Match"

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The "On The Issues Vote Match" has two parts:
 
The "On The Issues Vote Match" has two parts:
  
* A [http://www.ontheissues.org/Quiz/Quiz2012.asp?quiz=Pres2012 "VoteMatch" quiz] that members of the public can take to sort out where they stand on twenty issues. The twenty issue areas include a section of questions on economic issues and a section of questions on social issues. Questions about foreign policy are not part of the quiz.
+
* A [http://www.ontheissues.org/Quiz/Quiz2012.asp?quiz=Pres2012 "VoteMatch" quiz] that members of the public can take to sort out where they stand on twenty issues. The twenty issue areas include a section of questions on economic issues and a section of questions on social issues.  
 
* Information about the positions of a variety of prominent politicians about the same twenty issue areas. The staff of "On The Issues" conducts research using voting records, statements to the media, debate transcripts and citations from books authored by or about the politician to determine his or her stances on the twenty issues.
 
* Information about the positions of a variety of prominent politicians about the same twenty issue areas. The staff of "On The Issues" conducts research using voting records, statements to the media, debate transcripts and citations from books authored by or about the politician to determine his or her stances on the twenty issues.
  

Revision as of 07:10, 19 June 2014


On The Issues
On the Issues logo.PNG
President:Dr. Naomi Lichtenberg
Party:Non-partisan
Year created:1999
Website:Official website
The On The Issues Vote Match is a service provided by On The Issues, a non-partisan website launched in 1999.

The "On The Issues Vote Match" has two parts:

  • A "VoteMatch" quiz that members of the public can take to sort out where they stand on twenty issues. The twenty issue areas include a section of questions on economic issues and a section of questions on social issues.
  • Information about the positions of a variety of prominent politicians about the same twenty issue areas. The staff of "On The Issues" conducts research using voting records, statements to the media, debate transcripts and citations from books authored by or about the politician to determine his or her stances on the twenty issues.

Taken together, the vote match process allows a voter to determine the extent of overlap between his or her policy preferences, and those of a given politician.

About "On The Issues"

The organization "On The Issues" describes its mission as follows:[1]

Our mission is to provide non-partisan information for voters in the Presidential election, so that votes can be based on issues rather than on personalities and popularity.[2]

Staff

The staff list below is current as of June 2014.

  • Dr. Naomi Lichtenberg, President and CEO
  • Jesse Gordon, editor-in-chief and content manager
  • Ram Lau, debate and convention coverage
  • Kathleen and Derek Camara, book editing
  • Will Rico, marketing and advertising
  • Jamie and Adam Leighton, political books
  • Sanjaya Ghimire, technical

About the Vote Match results

This is a sample image result that could be created from the quiz.

The quiz offered by "On The Issues" to individual voters and readers includes two different types of questions -- social and economic. On The Issues describes those categories as follows:[3]

  • Social Questions: Liberals and libertarians agree in choosing the less-government answers, while conservatives and populists agree in choosing the more-restrictive answers.
    • A high score (above 60%) means the candidate believes in tolerance for different people and lifestyles.
    • A low score (below 40%) means the candidate believes that standards of morality & safety should be enforced by government.
  • Economic Questions: Conservatives and libertarians agree in choosing the less-government answers, while liberals and populists agree in choosing the more-restrictive answers.
    • A high score (above 60%) means the candidate believes in personal responsibility for financial matters, and that free-market competition is better for people than central planning by the government.
    • A low score (below 40%) means the candidate believes that a good society is best achieved by the government redistributing wealth. The candidate believes that government's purpose is to decide which programs are good for society, and how much should be spent on each program.

Once a reader has taken the quiz, a chart is generated that displays the reader's political preferences in a grid. The grid can then be compared to any of the grids created by "On The Issues" staff for a number of prominent politicians. See, for example, the this grid representing the views of John McCain.

The five sections in the political preferences chart visually depict the results of the political preferences quiz. Each intersection line has a more detailed description. For example, if the result is slightly over the 50-50 line in the liberal section, the resulting label is a "libertarian-leaning liberal". For a result slightly under, the result is a "populist-leaning liberal."[4]

There are five sections in the political preferences chart. The following description was sent via email to Ballotpedia staff to describe the quiz results.[4][5]

  • A "hard-core liberal" would answer social questions to minimize government involvement, but would answer economic questions to include government intervention.
  • A "hard-core libertarian" would answer both social and economic questions to minimize government involvement.
  • A "hard-core conservative" would answer social questions to include government intervention, but would answer economic questions to minimize government involvement.
  • A "hard-core populist" would answer both social and economic questions with proposals that include government intervention.
  • A moderate would be a combination in some capacity of the four quadrants.

Staff at On The Issues use the following additional descriptions to describe its political philosophy results. The following bullet points are from the On The Issues page about principles & values.[5]

  • Libertarian view: typically focusing on non-governmental solutions and private decision-making in both the social and economic dimensions. "Libertarian" is the philosophy that summarizes "socially liberal and fiscally conservative," although Libertarian Party members dislike that phrase.
  • Progressive view: Progressives, like libertarians, often describe themselves as "socially liberal and fiscally conservative;" progressives do so from the liberal side while libertarians do so from the conservative side.
  • Liberal or leftist view: typically focusing on helping needy members of society, and using government to achieve societal good; government intervention only in economic matters.
  • Conservative or rightist view: typically focusing on fiscal frugality, strength abroad, and moral integrity; government intervention acceptable in social and personal matters.
  • Populist view: typically focusing on local solutions instead of federal action, on decentralizing power, and on religion as the basis for societal good;
  • Centrist or mixed view: typically focusing on reforming or amending existing institutions rather than replacing them.

Issue areas

Note: The following explanatory text was taken verbatim from On The Issues with the organization's permission. Any inconsistencies are attributable to to the source material. The 20 issue areas/stances are as follows (organized by category: social or economic): Social:

  1. Abortion is a woman's unrestricted right
  2. Comfortable with same-sex marriage
  3. Keep God in the public sphere
  4. Human needs over animal rights
  5. Stricter punishment reduces crime
  6. Pathway to citizenship for illegal aliens
  7. Maintain US sovereignty from UN
  8. Expand the military
  9. Stay out of Iran
  10. Never legalize marijuana

Economic:

  1. Legally require hiring women and minorities
  2. Expand ObamaCare
  3. Privatize Social Security
  4. Vouchers for school choice
  5. Absolute right to gun ownership
  6. Higher taxes on the wealthy
  7. Support and expand free trade
  8. Stricter limits on political campaign funds
  9. Prioritize green energy
  10. Stimulus better than market-let recovery

"Abortion is a woman's unrestricted right"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Abortion is a woman's unrestricted right"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[6]
    • Abortion is a private decision between a woman and her doctor.
    • You believe in the 'Right to Choose' and are strongly pro-choice.
    • The right to abortion empowers women and is an important part of women's health rights and women's reproductive freedom. That right includes the right to a government subsidy for poor women who want an abortion.
  • Support means you believe:[6]
    • Restricting 'Partial-Birth Abortions' or other specific procedures is reasonable, but clinic access should be unfettered, since other women may choose differently than you. You are pro-choice, but believe that some restrictions are acceptable.
  • Oppose means you believe:[6]
    • The fetus is a human being who has rights independent of its mother's rights. You are "pro-life." While abortion under certain circumstances might be tolerated, the basic rights belong to the fetus, not the mother.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[6]
    • Abortion is immoral because it kills a human being, and should never be tolerated. 'Roe v. Wade' should be overturned and we should protest abortion clinics as other forms of injustice are protested.

"Comfortable with same-sex marriage"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Comfortable with same-sex marriage"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[7]
    • Neither governments nor corporations have any right to decide about sexual preferences. Give same-sex partners the same status as heterosexual partners, and give same-sex marriages the same status as traditional marriage.
  • Support means you believe:[7]
    • Homosexuals should be treated with equal respect as other members of society, not treated as criminals. You acknowledge the diversity of our society by including same-sex partners in most or all benefits of heterosexual marriage partners, but civil unions are preferable to using the term 'marriage.'
  • Oppose means you believe:[7]
    • Homosexuality is a lifestyle choice, and therefore those who choose it should live by the consequences of their choice. Marriage between a man and a woman is the central institution of American society - we shouldn't do anything that perverts that concept or threatens that ideal.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[7]
    • Homosexuality is immoral. You believe that the 'Gay Agenda' seeks to normalize homosexual activity and make it part of the mainstream as 'just another lifestyle.' We must draw the line so that homosexual values are not imposed upon our children.

"Keep God in the public sphere"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Keep God in the public sphere"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[8]
    • Judeo-Christian values are American values. Belief in God is what America was founded upon, so tax-funding religious organizations, or praying in school, does not violate the separation of church and state. Displaying the Ten Commandments is appropriate because they are the moral basis for Western law. The Pledge of Allegiance should continue to include the phrase "Under God."
  • Support means you believe:[8]
    • We need to teach values in our schools and account for our religious values in providing social services. The more our children are exposed to prayer, the Ten Commandments, and other traditional values, the better off they are.
  • Oppose means you believe:[8]
    • Faith-based organizations and prayer in schools are inappropriate because they fail to recognize American pluralism and religious diversity.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[8]
    • Separation of church and state precludes allowing school prayer, or providing funding for religious organizations. It also precludes other aspects of religion in government buildings, such as posting the Ten Commandments in public places. We should not violate the Constitutional principle in this case.

"Human needs over animal rights"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Human needs over animal rights"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[9]
    • The earth is humankind's domain to do with as we see fit.
  • Support means you believe:[9]
    • Human needs come first, but it's ok to account for environmental needs after human needs are accounted for.
  • Oppose means you believe:[9]
    • We should balance animal rights with human needs, accounting for nature's value for humans as well as for other environmental benefits.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[9]
    • Animals have inherent rights, and nature has inherent value.

"Stricter punishment reduces crime"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Stricter punishment reduces crime"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[10]
    • 'Three Strikes' laws put dangerous repeat offenders where they belong - behind bars, for life. And the Death Penalty gets rid of them once and for all. Mandatory sentencing and strict enforcement make sure that judges don't let off criminals too easily.
  • Support means you believe:[10]
    • Keep death penalty and 'Three Strikes' laws on the books because they seem to be effective, but consider ways to deal with special circumstances so we can avoid horror stories of inappropriate imprisonment.
  • Oppose means you believe:[10]
    • Strict enforcement of pre-determined sentencing threatens civil rights and should be used cautiously. Police, courts and prisons should focus on effective enforcement rather than strict enforcement. The death penalty should be used with extreme caution, if at all.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[10]
    • Judicial discretion should not be diminished by formulaic sentencing like 'Three Strikes.' Let judges and juries decide what penalties to apply in each case. The death penalty should be abolished as "cruel and unusual punishment".

"Pathway to citizenship for illegal aliens"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Pathway to citizenship for illegal aliens"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[11]
    • Immigration restrictions are basically racist because they keep out Hispanics and other non-whites. We should reform US immigration laws and use them to increase our diversity and cultural tolerance. Social services should be offered to all residents of the United States regardless of immigration status. Illegal aliens should be offered amnesty if they prove themselves as productive members of society.
  • Support means you believe:[11]
    • The government should make few restrictions on immigration. If the number of immigrants is too high, establish an immigration fee and raise it until the number of immigrants is acceptable. Or change the immigration quotas by some other method.
  • Oppose means you believe:[11]
    • Maintain legal immigration while enforcing against illegal immigration. Tighten our borders - decrease substantially or stop all immigration so we can address domestic problems.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[11]
    • We should strictly enforce our immigration laws by increasing border patrols, and we should crack down on illegal immigrants already in the US by deportation and by removing all their social benefits. In the long run, we should decrease immigration.

"Maintain U.S. sovereignty from U.N."

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "VoteMatch - Maintain U.S. sovereignty from U.N."

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[12]
    • The United Nations has too much power; the U.S. should withdraw, or restrict their actions. The same applies to other international institutions.
  • Support means you believe:[12]
    • United States military forces should never serve under other countries' commands; but multinational forces are acceptable under U.S. command. In general, the U.S. should consider her own national interests first, and then act with other nations in accordance with those interests.
  • Oppose means you believe:[12]
    • We can best advance U.S. interests by building alliances and working with other countries on mutual interests. Multilateralism is more effective than unilateralism.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[12]
    • The U.S. is just one country among hundreds; we are an important country but the opinions of others count too. We should not throw our weight around, but should use "soft power" and seek other non-military solutions.

"Expand the military"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Expand the military"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[13]
    • We have an obligation as the leaders of the world to maintain a strong military. And we have an obligation to our service personnel to pay them adequately.
  • Support means you believe:[13]
    • We should consider carefully before making more cuts - for example, base closings have hurt local economies, and reducing military personnel has put pressure on employment.
  • Oppose means you believe:[13]
    • Build smart, not necessarily big. Money is often better spent on issues other than defense. We should cut back on troops stationed abroad and focus on quality of our troops instead of quantity.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[13]
    • Defense spending includes huge amounts of pork-barrel spending and should be reduced dramatically. We should change our Defense policy to one of defense, instead of one where we police the world. Pull US troops out of Europe, Japan, Korea, and elsewhere. We are wrong to have a military that is as large as the rest of the world combined.

"Stay out of Iran"

Stance: Stay out of Iran

"Never legalize marijuana"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Never legalize marijuana"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[14]
    • Drug use is immoral and drugs poison our youth and our society. We should fight the Drug War using all reasonable means - Just Say No!
  • Support means you believe:[14]
    • The Drug War is winnable if we invest enough resources. We should do whatever we have to do: More police, more border patrols, more intervention abroad, more prison terms, more prisons.
  • Oppose means you believe:[14]
    • We should have regulated decriminalization. Medical marijuana might be legalized, for example, as might clean hypodermic needles. Our drug policy should be reformed, with less criminal penalties and more drug abuse clinics.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[14]
    • The Drug War should be ended. It has failed, condemning a 'Lost Generation' of blacks and Hispanics to prison and criminal records. End it now like we ended alcohol Prohibition, and organized crime and drug-related crime will decrease like it did when Prohibition ended.

"Legally require hiring women and minorities"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Legally require hiring women and minorities"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[15]
    • Affirmative Action makes up for past injustice. Until blacks, women, and other minorities are proportionately represented in the upper classes of the economy and the workplace, society owes them a hand up. Government should actively enforce Affirmative Action laws in private companies.
  • Support means you believe:[15]
    • Under-represented groups should be favored, but perhaps basing results on formal quotas goes too far. Nevertheless, the government should prosecute companies which discriminate against women and minorities.
  • Oppose means you believe:[15]
    • Affirmative Action is a noble idea, but should not be enforced by government. Government should enforce an end to racial prejudice, period.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[15]
    • Affirmative Action is better described as Reverse Discrimination. Quotas based on race and gender are wrong, whichever race or gender they favor. Under-represented groups should fend for themselves without government intervention.

"Expand ObamaCare"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Expand ObamaCare"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[16]
    • Too few Americans have adequate health insurance. The government should make funds available for more complete coverage, or should expand existing government-run coverage to all citizens. A single-payer system would solve most healthcare problems.
  • Support means you believe:[16]
    • The government should provide coverage or subsidize health insurance for at-risk groups such as children and the elderly. Society benefits when more people are covered. Universal health insurance is a good goal, although some market methods can work as well as government systems.
  • Oppose means you believe:[16]
    • While more thorough health coverage is a noble idea, further health coverage should be promoted through non-government means.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[16]
    • Nationalized health care would entail a government takeover of a large portion of the economy and undue intrusions into our personal medical histories. Remove the federal government from the health care industry.

"Privatize Social Security"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Privatize Social Security"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[17]
    • Our retirement funds should not be entrusted to the government. The entire Social Security system should be run instead as we currently run IRAs, Keogh plans, 401(k)'s, and other private pension plans.
  • Support means you believe:[17]
    • The Trust Fund might be invested in the stock market or via some other private investment vehicle. Individuals should be given at least some control over how their retirement funds are invested.
  • Oppose means you believe:[17]
    • Social Security should remain under federal control, but you want reforms on how the Trust Fund is handled. In particular, the 'Lockbox Bill' is a good first reform, since it keeps the system secure while avoiding privatization.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[17]
    • Social Security should remain forever under federal control to ensure that all Americans have a secure retirement. The Trust Fund should not be invested in anything like the stock market, since that would introduce undue risk.

"Vouchers for school choice"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Vouchers for school choice"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[18]
    • The government should not be in the business of running schools. State-funded vouchers should pay for privately-run education at private schools, parochial schools, charter schools, home-schooling, or whatever schools parents choose. Bush's "No Child Left Behind" act sets the stage for terminating failing schools.
  • Support means you believe:[18]
    • School choice helps the poor who would otherwise be stuck in failing schools. Why should only the elite be able to afford private school? Subsidize parents' school choices to foster equality, as long as the school respects separation of church and state, and meets basic state standards. Charter schools are a good compromise.
  • Oppose means you believe:[18]
    • Continue experimenting with charter schools, and with public school choice, but only as a limited experiment, and no vouchers. We should create pressure to improve our public schools, not abandon them. Bush's "No Child Left Behind" act is an unfunded mandate.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[18]
    • Public schools are an important component of American society. Improve public schools rather than destroying them with vouchers. More teachers, smaller classes, more funding - then parents will choose public schools.

"Absolute right to gun ownership"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Absolute right to gun ownership"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[19]
    • The right to bear arms is a basic Constitutional right and expresses the democratic principle of self-defense against tyrannical government. Leave gun rights as they are.
  • Support means you believe:[19]
    • It's not the instrument, it's the morality. Gun ownership should not be restricted - most gun owners use them safely and responsibly. To reduce gun-related crimes, address the moral problems of society and other issues.
  • Oppose means you believe:[19]
    • The only "gun right" is to self-defense against criminals and the right to a secure home and a secure person. Tighten registration rules and keep guns away from kids.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[19]
    • More guns mean more killing. Limit availability of guns by whatever means are effective. The 2nd amendment does not mean an unlimited right to any and all firearms.

"Higher taxes on the wealthy"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Higher taxes on the wealthy"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[20]
    • A progressive income tax is one of the cornerstones of modern society. Its premise is that the wealthy contribute proportionally more than those with lower incomes. That is the right way to run our tax system, and we should keep it that way.
  • Support means you believe:[20]
    • Flatter taxes benefit the wealthy more than the lower and middle class. We should focus tax relief on the majority of taxpayers instead of on the richest few percent, while preserving important deductions like mortgage interest and charitable donations.
  • Oppose means you believe:[20]
    • A Flat Tax would simplify the entire tax system. It would get rid of loopholes that drive tax-avoiding behaviors. And it would remove most deductions and the special interests that come with them. In the meantime, tax cuts benefit the economy in both good economic times and bad economic times.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[20]
    • Ideally, the income tax and the IRS should be abolished. Perhaps a national sales tax, like the FairTax, is a good replacement. Lower and flatter taxes are a good first step.

"Support and expand free trade"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Support and expand free trade"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[21]
    • Free trade is always in the people's interest. We should have open trade with every country in the world. The government has no right to make restrictions on imports or exports. NAFTA, GATT, and the WTO should be expanded and made less restrictive over time. Globalization is good.
  • Support means you believe:[21]
    • Free trade is in our national interest because it provides economic growth and jobs. We should only restrict free trade when it poses a security risk. Including environmental and labor safeguards are acceptable if they can be successfully negotiated into trade agreements, but should not be used as a pretext to stop trade agreements.
  • Oppose means you believe:[21]
    • Free trade should be replaced by fair trade. Free trade is not in our national interest when it poses a risk to job security, causes humanitarian problems overseas, or results in environmental damage. Globalization should focus on benefiting people instead of benefiting multinational corporations.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[21]
    • Americans should buy from other Americans because that creates American jobs. We should restrict trade with any country which costs us jobs or which creates a trade deficit. Globalization is just another means of corporate influence over our society.

"Stricter limits on political campaign funds"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Stricter limits on political campaign funds"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[22]
    • Public funds should be used for political campaigns. The best way to reduce the influence of big-money lobbyists and special interests is to remove as much money as possible from campaigning. Free television time would be a good start.
  • Support means you believe:[22]
    • Reforms are needed in campaign finance, in order to reduce the influence of moneyed interests. Those reforms might include restrictions on personal donations to political campaigns; restrictions on corporate, labor union, or PAC donations; and restrictions on PAC activities.
  • Oppose means you believe:[22]
    • Politicians will always find loopholes in any campaign finance reform, so the best approach is just to monitor campaigns for lawbreaking and leave the rest to the press. Better reporting of donations would be useful.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[22]
    • Campaign donations are free speech, and should not be limited for corporations nor for individuals. PACs and 527 committees should be similarly allowed free speech via unlimited spending on any issue or any candidate they choose.

"Prioritize green energy"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Prioritize green energy"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[23]
    • Overuse of fossil fuels causes serious problems that we should deal with immediately by raising carbon taxes, raising CAFE standards, federally funding research into alternative and sustainable energy resources, and push to implement the Kyoto Protocol.
  • Support means you believe:[23]
    • We should establish a market-based solution for excess carbon emissions, and the problem will be solved. The Kyoto Protocol should require developing countries' participation to make the solution work.
  • Oppose means you believe:[23]
    • The cost of dealing with global warming is far higher than the potential damage, so we should do nothing. There's some evidence for global warming, but the effects are not certain. We should perhaps sign on to some international agreements, but make only minimal financial commitments for now.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[23]
    • There's no such thing as global warming - it's all natural climatic variation. And if there is a problem, it won't affect us much, and we can deal with the problems as they arise.

"Stimulus better than market-led recovery"

DocumentIcon.jpg See full methodology and background from "On The Issues": "Stimulus better than market-led recovery"

Positions:

  • Strongly Support means you believe:[24]
    • The federal government should inject as much funding as needed to recuperate from the Great Recession, including direct federal job creation. Nationalization of banks and companies is more appropriate than bailouts.
  • Support means you believe:[24]
    • The federal government should institute incentives for private corporations for more hiring, to recuperate from the Great Recession. Funding to "bail out" private companies should be accompanied by rules for corporate behavior and repayment.
  • Oppose means you believe:[24]
    • Cutting taxes and reducing regulation is the means to recuperate from the Great Recession.
  • Strongly Oppose means you believe:[24]
    • The federal government caused the Great Recession, and keeping out of the economy will end it.

External links

References

  1. On The Issues, "About Us," accessed June 13, 2014
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.
  3. On The Issues, "Example candidate response with explanation," accessed June 18, 2014
  4. 4.0 4.1 Geoff Pallay, "Email exchange with On The Issues co-founder Jesse Gordon," June 17, 2014
  5. 5.0 5.1 On The Issues, "Background on Principles & Values," accessed June 18, 2014
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Abortion is a woman's unrestricted right," accessed June 13, 2014
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Comfortable with same-sex marriage," accessed June 13, 2014
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Keep God in the public sphere," accessed June 13, 2014
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Human needs over animal rights," accessed June 13, 2014
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Stricter punishment reduces crime," accessed June 13, 2014
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Pathway to citizenship for illegal aliens," accessed June 13, 2014
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Maintain U.S. sovereignty from U.N.," accessed June 13, 2014
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Expand the military," accessed June 13, 2014
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Never legalize marijuana," accessed June 13, 2014
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Legally require hiring women and minorities," accessed June 13, 2014
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Expand ObamaCare," accessed June 13, 2014
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Privatize Social Security," accessed June 13, 2014
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Vouchers for school choice," accessed June 13, 2014
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Absolute right to gun ownership," accessed June 13, 2014
  20. 20.0 20.1 20.2 20.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Higher taxes on the wealthy," accessed June 13, 2014
  21. 21.0 21.1 21.2 21.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Support and expand free trade," accessed June 13, 2014
  22. 22.0 22.1 22.2 22.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Stricter limits on political campaign funds," accessed June 13, 2014
  23. 23.0 23.1 23.2 23.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Prioritize green energy," accessed June 13, 2014
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 On The Issues, "VoteMatch - Stimulus better than market-led recovery," accessed June 13, 2014