Oregon Property Tax Measure Approval (2010)

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An Oregon Property Tax Measure Approval (temporarily titled as Initiative 39) did not appear on the November 2, 2010 ballot in Oregon as an initiated constitutional amendment. According to the secretary of state, supporters did not file signatures in an attempt to qualify the measure for the 2010 ballot.

Ballot title

The certified ballot title for Initiative 39 was:[1]

Amends Constitution: Majority vote approves property taxes only if "yes" votes comprise 35 percent of registered voters.

Result of "Yes" Vote: "Yes" vote requires that, for majority vote to approve property tax measure, the number of "yes" votes must comprise 35 percent of jurisdiction's registered voters.

Result of "No" Vote: "No" vote retains current law allowing property tax approval by simple majority vote at May/November elections and at elections with 50 percent voter turnout.

Summary: Amends constitution. Current law allows measures increasing, renewing, or imposing new property taxes to be approved by a simple majority of voters at a May/November election and at an election where at least 50 percent of the registered voters cast ballots; number of "yes" votes approving measure need not comprise any particular percentage of registered voters. Property tax measures raise money for local government services, including schools, law enforcement, libraries, parks, and other uses. Measure raises voter threshold for approving property taxes; requires number of "yes" votes approving measure to equal/exceed 35 percent of jurisdiction's registered voters; specifies that elections failing to meet these turnout and approval standards be deemed "null and void for lack of sufficient public interest or support." Other provisions.

Path to the ballot

See also: Oregon signature requirements

According to the secretary of state, supporters did not file signatures in an attempt to qualify the measure for the 2010 ballot. Petitions for an initiated constitutional amendment required eight percent of 1,379,475, or 110,358 signatures. The deadline for filing signatures for the November 2, 2010 ballot was July 2, 2010.

See also

External links

References