Difference between revisions of "Oregon Recreational Cannabis Amendment (2014)"

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(Created page with "{{marijuana}}{{tnr}} An '''Oregon Cannabis Amendment''' may appear on the November 4, 2014 statewide ballot in Oregon as an {{issfull}}.<r...")
 
 
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{{Noor2014}}{{marijuana}}{{tnr}}An '''Oregon Recreational Cannabis Amendment''', also known as '''Oregon Cannabis Amendment''', did not make the [[Oregon 2014 ballot measures|November 4, 2014 statewide ballot]] in [[Oregon]] as an {{icafull}}.<ref name=oregonian>[http://www.oregonlive.com/mapes/index.ssf/2013/10/oregon_facing_a_glut_of_hot-bu.html ''The Oregonian'', "From marriage to marijuana, Oregon facing flood of hot-button ballot measures next year," October 26, 2013]</ref>
  
An '''Oregon Cannabis Amendment''' may appear on the [[Oregon 2014 ballot measures|November 4, 2014 statewide ballot]] in [[Oregon]] as an {{issfull}}.<ref name=oregonian>[http://www.oregonlive.com/mapes/index.ssf/2013/10/oregon_facing_a_glut_of_hot-bu.html ''The Oregonian'', "From marriage to marijuana, Oregon facing flood of hot-button ballot measures next year," October 26, 2013]</ref>  
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The measure would have amended [[Article I, Oregon Constitution|Article I]] of the [[Oregon Constitution]] to allow adults aged 21 and older to use, possess and produce marijuana for recreational purposes. It would have also allowed the state to "reasonably define, limit and regulate the use, possession, production, sale or taxation of cannabis under state law." The measure's primary sponsor was Douglas Paul Stanford, along with The Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp. Stanford was the lead petitioner on 2012's failed [[Oregon Cannabis Tax Act Initiative, Measure 80 (2012)|Measure 80]], which sought to broadly legalize recreational marijuana.<ref name=sos>[http://egov.sos.state.or.us/elec/web_irr_search.record_detail?p_reference=20140021..LSCYYY. ''Oregon Secretary of State'', "Elections Division: Initiative, Referendum, and Referral Search," accessed June 2, 2014]</ref><ref name=m>[http://www.portlandmercury.com/BlogtownPDX/archives/2014/01/16/by-the-way-paul-stanfords-got-marijuana-initiatives-too ''PortlandMercury.com'', "By the Way, Paul Stanford's Got Marijuana Initiatives, Too," January 16, 2014]</ref> Stanford and his group also sponsored the [[Oregon Recreational Cannabis Tax Act, Initiative 22 (2014)|Oregon Cannabis Tax Act]].<ref name=sos/><ref name=hemp>[http://hemp.org/news/category/cannabis/oregon-cannabis-tax-act ''Hemp.org'', "Oregon: Why 24 Ounces? CRRH Explains Possession and Cultivation Limits Proposed in 2014 Initiative," April 25, 2014]</ref>
  
 
==Background==
 
==Background==
The [[2012 ballot measures|2012 elections]] proved to be groundbreaking for marijuana legalization support groups. Voters in [[Washington]] approved [[Washington Marijuana Legalization and Regulation, Initiative 502 (2012)|Initiative 502]], thereby legalizing the recreational use of marijuana. [[Colorado|Coloradans]] followed suit when they approved [[Colorado Marijuana Legalization Initiative, Amendment 64 (2012)|Amendment 64]] during the same election. However, voters in Oregon rejected [[Oregon Cannabis Tax Act Initiative, Measure 80 (2012)|Measure 80]], a similar, though slightly less stringent, marijuana legalization measure. Measure 80 would have allowed adults over the age of 21 to possess an unlimited supply of marijuana and given an industry-dominated board permission to regulate sales.<ref name=oct13/>
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The [[2012 ballot measures|2012 elections]] proved to be groundbreaking for marijuana legalization support groups. Voters in [[Washington]] approved [[Washington Marijuana Legalization and Regulation, Initiative 502 (2012)|Initiative 502]], thereby legalizing the recreational use of marijuana. [[Colorado|Coloradans]] followed suit when they approved [[Colorado Marijuana Legalization Initiative, Amendment 64 (2012)|Amendment 64]] during the same election. However, voters in Oregon rejected [[Oregon Cannabis Tax Act Initiative, Measure 80 (2012)|Measure 80]], a similar, though less stringent, marijuana legalization measure. Measure 80 would have allowed adults over the age of 21 to possess an unlimited supply of marijuana and given an industry-dominated board permission to regulate sales.<ref name=oct13>[http://www.oregonlive.com/mapes/index.ssf/2013/10/with_national_backing_marijuan.html ''OregonLive.com'', "With national backing, marijuana advocates file legalization measure," October 25, 2013]</ref>
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==Support==
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The measure was sponsored by The Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp and Douglas Paul Stanford.<ref name=sos/><ref name=hemp/>
  
 
==Path to the ballot==
 
==Path to the ballot==
::''See also: [[Laws governing the initiative process in Oregon]]
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::''See also: [[Amending_state_constitutions#Oregon|Amending the Oregon Constitution]]
 
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Supporters were required to collect [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Oregon#Number_required|116,284  valid signatures]] by [[Ballotpedia:Calendar|July 3, 2014]] in order to land the initiative on the ballot. No signatures were submitted for the measure.<ref>''[[Ballotpedia:Margaret Koenig|Margaret Koenig]]'', "Telephone interview with William N. Appel, a chief petitioner for the measure," July 3, 2014</ref>
Supporters must collect [[Laws_governing_the_initiative_process_in_Oregon#Number_required|87,213 valid signatures]] by [[Ballotpedia:Calendar|July 3, 2014]] in order to land the initiative on the ballot.
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Supporters of the initiative began collecting signatures on [[Ballotpedia:Calendar|April 17, 2014]].<ref name=apr14>[http://www.oregonlive.com/mapes/index.ssf/2014/04/marijuana_legalization_campaig.html ''OregonLive.com'', "Marijuana legalization campaign in Oregon will begin collecting signatures Thursday," April 16, 2014]</ref>
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==Similar measures==
 
==Similar measures==
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* [[Oregon Legalized Marijuana Initiative (2014)]]
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* [[Oregon Recreational Cannabis Tax Act, Initiative 22 (2014)]]
 
* [[Washington Marijuana Legalization and Regulation, Initiative 502 (2012)]] {{approved}}
 
* [[Washington Marijuana Legalization and Regulation, Initiative 502 (2012)]] {{approved}}
 
* [[Colorado Marijuana Legalization Initiative, Amendment 64 (2012)]] {{approved}}
 
* [[Colorado Marijuana Legalization Initiative, Amendment 64 (2012)]] {{approved}}
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* [[Oregon 2014 ballot measures]]
 
* [[Oregon 2014 ballot measures]]
 
* [[Laws governing the initiative process in Oregon]]
 
* [[Laws governing the initiative process in Oregon]]
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==External links==
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* [http://oregonvotes.org/irr/2014/021text.pdf Full text of proposed initiative 21]
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* [http://oregonvotes.org/irr/2014/021cbt.pdf Certified ballot title and summary for proposed initiative 21]
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
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{{oregon}}
 
{{oregon}}
 
[[Category:Oregon 2014 ballot measures]]
 
[[Category:Oregon 2014 ballot measures]]
[[Category:Marijuana, Oregon]]
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[[Category:Did not make ballot, marijuana]]
[[Category:Marijuana, 2014]]
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[[Category:State ballots, 2014]]
 
[[Category:State ballots, 2014]]

Latest revision as of 17:57, 3 July 2014

Not on Ballot
Proposed allot measures that were not on a ballot
This measure did not or
will not appear on a ballot
Voting on Marijuana
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Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
An Oregon Recreational Cannabis Amendment, also known as Oregon Cannabis Amendment, did not make the November 4, 2014 statewide ballot in Oregon as an initiated constitutional amendment.[1]

The measure would have amended Article I of the Oregon Constitution to allow adults aged 21 and older to use, possess and produce marijuana for recreational purposes. It would have also allowed the state to "reasonably define, limit and regulate the use, possession, production, sale or taxation of cannabis under state law." The measure's primary sponsor was Douglas Paul Stanford, along with The Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp. Stanford was the lead petitioner on 2012's failed Measure 80, which sought to broadly legalize recreational marijuana.[2][3] Stanford and his group also sponsored the Oregon Cannabis Tax Act.[2][4]

Background

The 2012 elections proved to be groundbreaking for marijuana legalization support groups. Voters in Washington approved Initiative 502, thereby legalizing the recreational use of marijuana. Coloradans followed suit when they approved Amendment 64 during the same election. However, voters in Oregon rejected Measure 80, a similar, though less stringent, marijuana legalization measure. Measure 80 would have allowed adults over the age of 21 to possess an unlimited supply of marijuana and given an industry-dominated board permission to regulate sales.[5]

Support

The measure was sponsored by The Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp and Douglas Paul Stanford.[2][4]

Path to the ballot

See also: Amending the Oregon Constitution

Supporters were required to collect 116,284 valid signatures by July 3, 2014 in order to land the initiative on the ballot. No signatures were submitted for the measure.[6]

Similar measures

See also

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External links

References