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Difference between revisions of "Orlando, Florida"

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{{tnr}}'''Orlando''' is a city in [[Florida]] and the [[county seat]] of [[Orange County, Florida|Orange County]]. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, Orlando had a population of 238,300, making it the state's fifth most populous city.<ref>[http://2010.census.gov/news/releases/operations/cb11-cn95.html Orlando population]</ref>  
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{{Muni scope update|Month=October 2013|Reason=Needs full update}}{{tnr}}'''Orlando''' is a city in [[Florida]] and the [[county seat]] of [[Orange County, Florida|Orange County]]. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, Orlando had a population of 238,300, making it the state's fifth most populous city.<ref>[http://2010.census.gov/news/releases/operations/cb11-cn95.html Orlando population]</ref>  
  
 
Incorporated in 1875 on an area of 4 square miles and officially made a city in 1885, Orlando is now -- on an area of approximately 100 square miles -- the famous home of Walt Disney World, Universal Orlando Resort and SeaWorld Orlando.<ref>[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orlando,_Florida Orlando, Florida on Wikipedia]</ref> <ref>[http://www.cityoforlando.net/about_orlando.htm city's founding]</ref>
 
Incorporated in 1875 on an area of 4 square miles and officially made a city in 1885, Orlando is now -- on an area of approximately 100 square miles -- the famous home of Walt Disney World, Universal Orlando Resort and SeaWorld Orlando.<ref>[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orlando,_Florida Orlando, Florida on Wikipedia]</ref> <ref>[http://www.cityoforlando.net/about_orlando.htm city's founding]</ref>

Revision as of 07:30, 6 February 2014


Orlando is a city in Florida and the county seat of Orange County. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, Orlando had a population of 238,300, making it the state's fifth most populous city.[1]

Incorporated in 1875 on an area of 4 square miles and officially made a city in 1885, Orlando is now -- on an area of approximately 100 square miles -- the famous home of Walt Disney World, Universal Orlando Resort and SeaWorld Orlando.[2] [3]

Elected Officials

Orlando operates under a strong-mayor governing model in which the voter-elected mayor serves as the executive body and the city council, also elected by voters, serves a legislative function.[4] The city council is composed of six commissioners elected at-large to serve four year terms.

Miami's current mayor is Buddy Dyer, who has been in office since 2003.[5] City commissioners, all non-partisan, as of June 2011:[6]

Commissioner District 1st Yr. Elected
Phil Diamond District 1 2002
Tony Ortiz District 2 2008
Robert F. Stuart District 3 2006
Patty Sheehan District 4 2000
Daisy W. Lynum District 5 1998
Samuel B. Ings District 6 2006

According to the proposed 2009-10 city budget, commissioners would earn $49,383 annually. Each commissioner has a different district budget, however. For instance, Stuart's is $22,539 but Ings's is $48,679 and Lynum's is $45,671. Ings and Lynum have the highest district budgets. All other budgets are under $20,000 per year.[7]

Expenditures per district rose during the 2010-11 fiscal year compared to the previous fiscal year. The increase in expenditures, respective of each district: 5.37%, 6.43%, 10.87%, 5.47%, 8.70%, 1.17%[8]

Lobbying

Main articles: Florida government sector lobbying and Florida League of Cities.

Orlando has reported more than $675,000 spent on lobbying since 2000 (see table).

Reported lobbying expenditures, 2000-2010 [9]
Year Amount spent on lobbying
2010 $80,000
2009 $90,000
2008 $85,000
2007 $80,000
2006 $80,000
2005 $20,000
2004 $40,000
2003 $80,000
2002 $80,000
2001 $40,000
2000 Less than $10,000

Orlando pays membership dues[10] to the Florida League of Cities, a government sector lobbying association.

Website evaluation

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Budget
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Meetings
{{{1}}}
Elected Officials
{{{1}}}
Administrative Officials
{{{1}}}
Permits, zoning
{{{1}}}
Audits
{{{1}}}
Contracts P
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Lobbying P
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Public Records P
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Local Taxes N
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Transparency grading process

The good

  • Budget is published.[11]
  • Commissioners are listed with contact information. Meeting schedule, agenda, and minutes are available.[12]
  • Administrative officials are listed with contact information.[13]
  • Available bids are listed through the Purchasing and Materials Management Division. Awarded, cancelled, deleted and active contracts are mentioned and details are provided.[14]
  • Annual financial audits are published.[15]
  • Building permits[16] and zoning information is provided.[17]
  • Links to public record including state statutes are included.[18]

The bad

External links

References