Difference between revisions of "Paul Ryan"

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{{Yea vote}} On September 30, 2013, the House passed a final stopgap spending bill before the shutdown went into effect. The bill included a one-year delay of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate and would have also stripped the bill of federal subsidies for congressional members and staff. It passed through the House with a vote of 228-201.<ref>[http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2013/roll504.xml ''Clerk of the U.S. House'', "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013]</ref> At 1 a.m. on October 1, 2013, one hour after the shutdown officially began, the House voted to move forward with going to a conference. In short order, Sen. [[Harry Reid]] rejected the call to conference.<ref>[http://www.buzzfeed.com/katenocera/government-shutdown-how-we-got-here?bffb ''Buzzfeed'', "Government Shutdown: How We Got Here," accessed October 1, 2013]</ref> Ryan voted to approve the stopgap spending bill that would have delayed the individual mandate.<ref>[http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2013/roll504.xml''Clerk of the U.S. House'', "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013]</ref>
 
{{Yea vote}} On September 30, 2013, the House passed a final stopgap spending bill before the shutdown went into effect. The bill included a one-year delay of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate and would have also stripped the bill of federal subsidies for congressional members and staff. It passed through the House with a vote of 228-201.<ref>[http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2013/roll504.xml ''Clerk of the U.S. House'', "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013]</ref> At 1 a.m. on October 1, 2013, one hour after the shutdown officially began, the House voted to move forward with going to a conference. In short order, Sen. [[Harry Reid]] rejected the call to conference.<ref>[http://www.buzzfeed.com/katenocera/government-shutdown-how-we-got-here?bffb ''Buzzfeed'', "Government Shutdown: How We Got Here," accessed October 1, 2013]</ref> Ryan voted to approve the stopgap spending bill that would have delayed the individual mandate.<ref>[http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2013/roll504.xml''Clerk of the U.S. House'', "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013]</ref>
  
{{nay vote}}The shutdown finally ended on October 16, 2013, when the House took a vote on HR 2775 after it was approved by the [[United States Senate|Senate]]. The bill to reopen the government lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by [[United States Senate|Senate Democrats]] was to require income verification for [[Obamacare]] subsidies.<ref>[http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/house-effort-to-end-fiscal-crisis-collapses-leaving-senate-to-forge-last-minute-solution/2013/10/16/1e8bb150-364d-11e3-be86-6aeaa439845b_story_1.html ''The Washington Post'', "Reid, McConnell propose bipartisan Senate bill to end shutdown, extend borrowing," accessed October 16, 2013]</ref> The House passed the legislation shortly after the Senate, by a vote of 285-144, with all 144 votes against the legislation coming from [[Republican]] members. Ryan voted against HR 2775.<ref>[http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2013/roll550.xml ''U.S. House'', "Final vote results for Roll Call 550," accessed October 31, 2013]</ref>
+
{{nay vote}}The shutdown ended on October 16, 2013, when the House took a vote on HR 2775 after it was approved by the [[United States Senate|Senate]]. The bill to reopen the government lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by [[United States Senate|Senate Democrats]] was to require income verification for [[Obamacare]] subsidies.<ref>[http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/house-effort-to-end-fiscal-crisis-collapses-leaving-senate-to-forge-last-minute-solution/2013/10/16/1e8bb150-364d-11e3-be86-6aeaa439845b_story_1.html ''The Washington Post'', "Reid, McConnell propose bipartisan Senate bill to end shutdown, extend borrowing," accessed October 16, 2013]</ref> The House passed the legislation shortly after the Senate, by a vote of 285-144, with all 144 votes against the legislation coming from [[Republican]] members. Ryan voted against HR 2775.<ref>[http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2013/roll550.xml ''U.S. House'', "Final vote results for Roll Call 550," accessed October 31, 2013]</ref>
  
 
Ryan said he donated his salary while the government was shutdown.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/story/2013/10/government-shutdown-congress-donate-salary-97663.html?hp=lh_b1 ''Politico'', "Hill pols plan to donate, halt salary," accessed October 1, 2013]</ref>
 
Ryan said he donated his salary while the government was shutdown.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/story/2013/10/government-shutdown-congress-donate-salary-97663.html?hp=lh_b1 ''Politico'', "Hill pols plan to donate, halt salary," accessed October 1, 2013]</ref>

Revision as of 16:30, 18 August 2014

Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan.jpg
U.S. House, Wisconsin, District 1
Incumbent
In office
January 3, 1999-present
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 16
PartyRepublican
PredecessorMark Neumann (R)
Leadership
Legislative director to Sen. Sam Brownback (KS)
1995-1997
Aide to Sen. Robert Kasten (WI)
1992
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
First electedNovember 3, 1998
Next generalNovember 4, 2014
Campaign $$15,995,498
Term limitsN/A
Education
High schoolJoseph A. Craig High School, WI
Bachelor'sMiami University, OH
Personal
Date of birthJanuary 29, 1970
Place of birthJanesville, WI
Net worth$5,405,548.50
ReligionCatholic
Websites
Office website
Personal website
Campaign website

Contents

Paul Ryan (b. January 29, 1970, in Janesville, WI) is a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from the state of Wisconsin. Ryan represents Wisconsin's 1st Congressional District and was first elected to the House in 1998. He ran for re-election in 2014. Ryan defeated Jeremy Ryan in the Republican primary.[1] He will face Rob Zerban (D) in the general election.

Ryan appeared on the 2012 presidential ticket as Mitt Romney's vice presidential running mate. Despite losing the presidential race, Ryan won re-election to the House in 2012.[2]

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Ryan is an average Republican member of Congress, meaning he will vote with the Republican Party on the majority of bills.

Biography

After graduating from Miami University of Ohio, Ryan moved to Washington D.C., where he put his political science degree to use as an aide to Wisconsin Senator Robert Kasten and a speechwriter for deceased former congressman Jack Kemp. Prior to entering Congress in 1999 at age 28, Ryan also worked on the policy staff for the conservative think tank, Empower America.[3][4]

Career

Below is an abbreviated outline of Ryan's professional and political career:[5]

  • 1999-Present: U.S. House of Representatives
  • 1995-1997: Legislative Director to Sen. Sam Brownback (KS)
  • 1993-1995: Advisor and speechwriter for Empower America
  • 1992: Aide to Sen. Robert Kasten (WI)

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2013-2014

Ryan serves on the following committees:[6][7]

2011-2012

Ryan was a member of the following House committees:[8]

Key votes

113th Congress

CongressLogo.png

The second session of the 113th Congress enacted into law 224 out of the 3215 introduced bills (7 percent). Comparatively, the 112th Congress had 4.2 percent of introduced bills enacted into law in the second session.[9] For more information pertaining to Ryan's voting record in the 113th Congress, please see the below sections.[10]

National security

NDAA

Yea3.png Ryan voted for HR 1960 - the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014. The bill passed the House on June 14, 2013, with a vote of 315 - 108. Both parties were somewhat divided on the vote.[11]

DHS Appropriations

Yea3.png Ryan voted for HR 2217 - the DHS Appropriations Act (2014) Act of 2014. The bill passed the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 245 - 182 that was largely along party lines.[12]

Keystone Pipeline Amendment

Nay3.png Ryan voted against House Amendment 69, which would have amended HR 3 to "require that the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, in consultation with the Department of Homeland Security, conduct a study of the vulnerabilities of the Keystone XL pipeline to a terrorist attack and certify that necessary protections have been put in place." The amendment failed on May 22, 2013, with a vote of 176 - 239 and was largely along party lines.[13]

CISPA (2013)

Yea3.png Ryan voted for HR 624 - the CISPA (2013). The bill passed the House on April 18, 2013, with a vote of 288 - 127. The bill would allow federal intelligence agencies to share cybersecurity intelligence and information with private entities and utilities. The bill was largely supported by Republicans, but divided the Democratic Party.[14]

Economy

Farm bill

Yea3.png On January 29, 2014, the U.S. House approved the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013, H.R. 2642, also known as the Farm Bill.[15] The bill passed by a vote of 251-166. The nearly 1,000-page bill reformed and continued various programs of the Department of Agriculture through 2018. The $1 trillion bill expanded crop insurance for farmers by $7 billion over the next decade and created new subsidies for rice and peanut growers that would kick in when prices drop.[16][17] However, cuts to the food stamp program cut an average of $90 per month for 1.7 million people in 15 states.[17] Ryan voted with 161 other Republican representatives in favor of the bill.

2014 Budget

Yea3.png On January 15, 2014, the Republican-run House approved H.R. 3547, a $1.1 trillion spending bill to fund the government through September 30, 2014.[18][19] The House voted 359-67 for the 1,582-page bill, with 64 Republicans and three Democrats voting against the bill.[19] The omnibus package included 12 annual spending bills to fund federal operations.[20] It increased the paychecks of federal workers and military personnel by 1 percent, increased Head Start funding for early childhood education by $1 billion, reduced funding to the Internal Revenue Service and the Environmental Protection Agency, and protected the Affordable Care Act from any drastic cuts. Ryan voted with the majority of the Republican party in favor of the bill.[18]

Report on budget

In a March 2014 report critiquing the budget situation, Ryan developed his own proposal of programs to cut. Among those programs were welfare, child care, college Pell grants and other assistance programs.[21]

In the short term, Ryan's proposal attempted to introduce some concrete Republican solutions to reverse perceptions that the GOP had become simply the party of "no" in opposition to Obama.[21]

"This report will help start the conversation. It shows that some programs work; others don't. And for many of them, we just don't know. Clearly, we can do better," Ryan said.[21]

Government shutdown
See also: United States budget debate, 2013

Yea3.png On September 30, 2013, the House passed a final stopgap spending bill before the shutdown went into effect. The bill included a one-year delay of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate and would have also stripped the bill of federal subsidies for congressional members and staff. It passed through the House with a vote of 228-201.[22] At 1 a.m. on October 1, 2013, one hour after the shutdown officially began, the House voted to move forward with going to a conference. In short order, Sen. Harry Reid rejected the call to conference.[23] Ryan voted to approve the stopgap spending bill that would have delayed the individual mandate.[24]

Nay3.pngThe shutdown ended on October 16, 2013, when the House took a vote on HR 2775 after it was approved by the Senate. The bill to reopen the government lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by Senate Democrats was to require income verification for Obamacare subsidies.[25] The House passed the legislation shortly after the Senate, by a vote of 285-144, with all 144 votes against the legislation coming from Republican members. Ryan voted against HR 2775.[26]

Ryan said he donated his salary while the government was shutdown.[27]

Ryan spoke with the press on the first day of the shutdown, October 1, 2013. He suggested an agreement to end the shutdown could be tied in with the debt ceiling, which hit its limit on October 17, 2013. He said, "We have a debt limit coming. Most budget agreements in the past have always involved debt limit increases. We think that's the forcing mechanism, just like the Budget Control Act that President Obama signed before." He added, "That's what we think we need. A forcing action to bring two parties together." He added, "We don't want to close the government down. We want it open. But we want fairness ... We want a budget agreement that gets the debt under control."[28]

He wrote an op-ed on October 9, 2013, and then went on Bill Bennett's radio show to address the shutdown and entitlements. He said, "I don’t know that within the next two weeks we have a viable strategy for actually repealing Obamacare, every piece of it." He added, "We’re going to keep going after Obamacare. I’m totally committed to dismantling this law because what we’re learning soon here is that’s it’s going to do so much damage to this country. Premiums are skyrocketing, people are losing the coverage they had, businesses are knocking people down less than 40 hours a week, it’s just terrible." In his op-ed published in The Wall Street Journal, he wrote, .".. we need a complete rethinking of government’s approach to helping the most vulnerable, and a complete rethinking of government’s approach to health care. But right now, we need to find common ground. We need to open the federal government. We need to pay our bills today — and make sure we can pay our bills tomorrow."[29]

In November 2013, Ryan said there would not be a shutdown in January when the spending bill was set to run out. Ryan said that either they would strike a deal with Congress or keep government funding the same. He also added that the Obamacare defunding attempt would not be repeated again in January, explaining his fellow Republicans now realized it's not discretionary spending-"Obamacare is an entitlement, they are not related."[30]

Farm Bill
See also: United States Farm Bill 2013

Yea3.png Ryan voted for the Farm Bill on July 11, 2013. The bill passed in a 216-208 vote.[31] The bill passed included farm policy, but did not include food stamps.[32]

Budget agreement

Ryan released a statement following the bipartisan budget agreement he helped negotiate. He said, "As a conservative, I deal with the situation as it exists. I deal with the way things are, not necessarily the way I want them to be. I've passed three budgets in a row that reflect my priorities and my principles and everything I wanted to accomplish. We're in divided government. I realize I'm not going to get that. So I'm not going to go a mile in the direction I wanted to go to, but I will take a few steps in the right direction. This agreement takes us in the right direction, from my perspective, for the very reasons I laid out before."[33]

He added, "This says let’s cut spending in a smarter way, some permanent spending cuts to pay for some temporary sequester relief, resulting in net deficit reduction without raising taxes. That’s fiscal responsibility. That’s fiscal conservatism. And it adds a greater stability to the situation. It prevents government shutdowns, which we don’t think is anyone’s interest. That to me is the right thing to do, and that is a conservative looking at the situation as it is, making it better."[34]

He elaborated on the agreement saying, "The House budget reflects our ultimate goals. It balanced the budget within 10 years, it pays off the debt, but I realize that that is not going to pass in this divided government. I see this agreement as a step in the right direction. In divided government, you don’t always get what you want. That said, we still can make progress toward our goals."[34]

Immigration

Morton Memos Prohibition

Yea3.png Ryan voted for House Amendment 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order. The amendment was adopted by the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 224 - 201. The purpose of the amendment as stated on the official text is to "prohibit the use of funds to finalize, implement, administer, or enforce the Morton Memos." These memos would have granted administrative amnesty to certain illegal aliens residing in the United States.[35] The vote largely followed party lines.[36]

Healthcare

Healthcare Reform Rules

Yea3.png Ryan voted for House Amendment 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The amendment was adopted by the House on August 2, 2013, with a vote of 227-185. The amendment requires that all changes to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act be approved by Congress before taking effect. The vote was largely along party lines.[37]

Social issues

Abortion

Yea3.png Ryan voted for HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act. The resolution passed the House on June 18, 2013, with a vote of 228 - 196 that largely followed party lines. The purpose of the bill is to ban abortions that would take place 20 or more weeks after fertilization.[38]

Government affairs

HR 676
See also: Boehner's lawsuit against the Obama administration

Yea3.png On July 30, 2014, the U.S. House approved a resolution 225 to 201 to sue President Barack Obama for exceeding his constitutional authority. Five RepublicansThomas Massie of Kentucky, Paul Broun of Georgia, Scott Garrett of New Jersey, Walter Jones of North Carolina and Steve Stockman of Texas—voted with Democrats against the lawsuit.[39] Ryan joined the other 224 Republicans in favor of the lawsuit. All Democrats voted against the resolution.[40][41]

Previous congressional sessions

Fiscal Cliff

Yea3.png Ryan voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was 1 of 85 Republicans that voted in favor of the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257-167 vote on January 1, 2013.[42]

Issues

On The Issues Vote Match

Ryan's Vote Match results from On The Issues.
See also: On The Issues Vote Match

On The Issues conducts a VoteMatch analysis of elected officials based on 20 issue areas. Rather than relying on incumbents to complete the quiz themselves, the VoteMatch analysis is conducted using voting records, statements to the media, debate transcripts or citations from books authored by or about the candidate. Based on the results of the quiz, Ryan is a Hard-Core Conservative. Ryan received a score of 16 percent on social issues and 93 percent on economic issues.[43]

Note: We are working to resolve inaccuracies with this information. Thank you for your patience.

On The Issues organization logo.


Book deal

On September 22, 2013, it was announced that Ryan was in the process of writing a book about the current and future state of conservatism. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here?," is set for publication in August 2014. This is Ryan's second book. His first book, "Young Guns: A New Generation of Conservative Leaders," was co-authored with fellow Republican Reps. Eric Cantor and Kevin McCarthy in 2010.[44]

September 2013 NYC event

Six of the Republican Party’s leaders and potential 2016 nominees jointly headlined a fundraiser for the Republican National Committee (RNC) in New York in September 2013. The event was hosted by RNC Chairman Reince Priebus and Jets owner Woody Johnson on September 23, 2013. The dinner and reception were held at Johnson’s home. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Senators Marco Rubio and Rand Paul and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, as well as Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder and Rep. Ryan, were listed as the “special guests.”[45]

It represented a major force of star power at a single event on behalf of the party, and it featured some of the party’s brightest future talent, many of whom represent different wings of the GOP.[45]

Future Speaker of the House?

Ryan's name has been tossed around as a potential successor to John Boehner as Speaker of the House. While this could happen, it doesn't appear to be in the immediate future, as Boehner is running for re-election in 2014 and Ryan has been mentioned as taking over the Means and Ways Committee in 2015.[46]

Texas Tribune luncheon

At a luncheon sponsored by local chambers of commerce and the Texas Tribune on January 23, 2014, Ryan declared that he did not want the Speaker of the House position.[47] He declined to say whether he was interested in the chairmanship of the House Ways and Means Committee.[47]

“When Janna and I joined [Mitt Romney’s presidential] ticket, we looked at what would this do to our family and we realized that actually we would see each other more in the vice presidency than as a member of the House,” Ryan said. “We would see each other less in the speakership than as a member of the House.”[47]

“I could’ve decided to go on the elected leadership route years ago,” Ryan said. “I’m more of a policy person. I prefer spending my days on policy and my weekends at home with my family. My weekends consist of going to the YMCA for basketball and then one of their neighborhood parishes for basketball these days. I want to keep doing that. … The speaker is expected to fly around the country on weekends as well, helping folks — I’m not going to do that. I’m four days a week in D.C. and three days a week in Janesville — it’s a good mix, I like that mix.”[47]

Scope of presidency

On February 2, 2014, Ryan said during an appearance on This Week that President Barack Obama is running an "increasingly lawless presidency" by circumventing Congress.[48]

"It's not the number of executive orders, it's the scope of the executive orders. It's the fact that he is actually contradicting law like in the health care case, or proposing new laws without going through congress, George, that's the issue...We have an increasingly lawless presidency where he is actually doing the job of Congress, writing new policies and new laws without going through congress. Presidents don't write laws, Congress does. And when he does things like he did in health care, delaying mandates that the law said was supposed to occur when they were supposed to occur, that's not his job. The job of Congress is to change laws if he doesn't like them, not the presidency."[48]

Presidential preference

2012

See also: Endorsements by state officials of presidential candidates in the 2012 election

Paul Ryan endorsed Mitt Romney in the 2012 presidential election. [49]

Endorsements

Idaho's 2nd District

Ryan endorsed incumbent Mike Simpson on March 4, 2014.[50] Ryan said in his endorsement, “Mike Simpson has been in the trenches fighting to reform runaway spending and has been a critical voice in passing our plan to balance the budget and pay down our debt."[50]

Alabama's 1st special election

Republican candidate Wells Griffith picked up a high-profile endorsement from Ryan on August 7, 2013, for the special election for Alabama's 1st Congressional District.[50] "I've known Wells Griffith for a long time and consider him a true friend," said Ryan. "Wells is committed to moving our country and our party forward. His dedication to advancing conservative principles is admirable and he will be a strong conservative voice for South Alabama."[50]

The endorsement set off one of Griffith’s challengers, columnist Quin Hillyer, who attacked Ryan for his views on immigration and labor relations.[51]

"Alabama's economy is dependent on being a right to work state, but Ryan keeps adding to a long record of limiting employee freedom and driving up costs via support for the horrible Davis-Bacon law and other suck-ups to union bosses," Hillyer said.

Hillyer also accused Ryan of abandoning conservatives in Congress. He sharply criticized Ryan for his efforts to strike a deal to pass immigration reform in the House.[52]

"I have been a longtime admirer of Paul Ryan, but he has increasingly proved to be a disappointment and out of touch with Alabama values," Hillyer said. "Ryan is the driving force in the House for amnesty, against the principles laid out by our own Senator Jeff Sessions. If one of my opponents wants a leftward-moving Paul Ryan, he can have him."[52]

New York's 21st District

See also: New York's 21st Congressional District elections, 2014

Ryan endorsed Republican Elise Stefanik in the 2014 election cycle for New York's 21st Congressional District. He said, "My friend Elise Stefanik is running for Congress to fight for hardworking families in upstate New York. She’s got the values and the work ethic to get the job done. She’s part of a new generation of leaders who will bring fresh ideas to Washington, and she has my full support."[53]

Elections

2016

See also: Possible 2016 U.S. Presidential candidates
Paul Ryan declined to run for the presidency in 2016. Read more about the events leading up to this decision.

Presidential-Elections-Masthead.png
Ryancover.JPG

Paul-Ryan-circle.png

Possible presidential candidate
Paul Ryan

Political offices:
Current U.S. Representative
(1999-Present)

Date he announced he would not run:
January 12, 2015

Ryan on the issues:
TaxesGovernment regulationsInternational tradeBudgetsAgricultural subsidiesFederal assistance programsForeign affairsFederalismNatural resourcesHealthcareImmigrationEducationAbortionGay rightsCharacterCommunicationsPolitical and leadership attributes

Republican Party Possible Republicans:
Jeb BushBen CarsonChris ChristieTed CruzCarly FiorinaNikki HaleyMike HuckabeeBobby JindalJohn KasichPeter KingRand PaulMike PenceRick PerryMarco RubioBrian SandovalRick SantorumScott Walker
See also: Paul Ryan

Paul Ryan was considered a potential candidate for President of the United States in 2016. Ryan is a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from the state of Wisconsin. He represents Wisconsin's 1st Congressional District and was first elected to the House in 1998.[54] Ryan campaigned for vice president on the Republican ticket with Mitt Romney in 2012.[55]

On January 12, 2015, he announced that he would not seek the presidency and would instead focus on his new position as chairman of the House Ways and Means committee.[56] Only one president, James Garfield, was elected to office as a sitting House member.[57]

On the trail

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Campaign preparation

Decision not to run

  • Shortly after Republicans chose Paul Ryan as chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, Ryan announced that he would forgo a 2016 run. In a post-decision interview, Ryan said, "I feel like I am in a position to make a big difference where I am and I want to do that."[58][59]

Preparations

  • Ryan released a book in 2014 on the state of conservatism titled, The Way Forward.[60]

Comments on a possible run

  • When asked in August 2014 whether he was considering a presidential run, Ryan stated, "As far as myself and my family, this is a decision we're going to take very seriously and weigh in 2015, so I just don't know the answer to your question at this time."[61]

Fundraising events

Advisors and staff

  • Joyce Meyer, who is staff director of the House Ways and Means Committee, "has been a senior aide to Congressman Ryan since he was first elected to the House...and has been a primary advisor on tax policy and other legislative issues for Ryan."[63]

Public opinion polls

  • A March 2014 poll conducted by CNN had Paul Ryan one point behind Sen. Rand Paul on a list of presidential hopefuls. At 15 percent support, Ryan came in ahead of Rick Perry and Mike Huckabee, the only other potential candidates to poll in the double figures.[64]

On the issues

Economic and fiscal

Taxes

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Taxes

"Paul Ryan on Taxes with MSNBC's Chris Matthews," July 26, 2010.
  • Paul Ryan is considered to be "the Republican Party's leading voice on taxes and budgets," according to David Lawder of Reuters.[65]
  • In 2001, Ryan voted for HR 1836 - the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001.[66] Ryan also voted for HR 2 - the Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003.[67] Collectively, these are known as the Bush tax cuts.
  • In 2012, Ryan voted for HR 8 - the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which made the Bush tax cuts permanent.[68]

Government regulations

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Government regulations
  • Many of Paul Ryan's opinions on regulation are outlined in the "Path to Prosperity" proposal. The budget proposal is critical of the Dodd-Frank Act. According to the report, "Although the bill is dubbed 'Wall Street Reform,' it actually intensifies the problem of too-big-to-fail by giving large, interconnected financial institutions advantages that small firms will not enjoy."[69]
  • In 2012, Ryan voted in favor of HR 6684 - the Spending Reduction Act of 2012. The bill reduced federal spending on a number of assistance, research and retirement programs.[70]
  • In 2011, Ryan co-sponsored HR 2898 - the Regulation Moratorium and Jobs Preservation Act of 2011, which proposed prohibiting "any federal agency from taking any significant regulatory action until the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports a monthly unemployment rate equal to or less than 7.7 percent."[71]

International trade

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/International trade
  • In 2000, Paul Ryan voted in favor of HR 434 - the Trade and Development Act of 2000, which authorized "the President to designate a sub-Saharan African country as a beneficiary country eligible to receive duty-free treatment, through September 30, 2008, for any non-import-sensitive article that is the growth, product, or manufacture of such country."[72]
  • In 2008, Ryan voted for HR 1830, which extended "the duty-free treatment or other preferential treatment for Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia and Peru" by extending the Andean Trade Preference Act.[73]

Budgets

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Budgets
  • In 2011, Ryan introduced HConRes 34 - "Establishing the budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2012 and setting forth appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2013 through 2021," known popularly as the Ryan Budget Bill. It passed the House on April 15, 2011.[74]
  • The "Path to Prosperity" budget proposal created by Ryan and the House Budget Committee in 2012 supported limiting spending. According to the report, "Restoring spending discipline in Washington is a necessary precondition for economic growth and job creation."[69]
  • In May 2008, Ryan introduced HR 6110 - the Roadmap for America's Future Act of 2008. He proposed a balanced budget by changing "the Congressional Budget Act to make it out of order for the House or Senate to consider any legislation that would cause: (1) an excess spending amount; or (2) aggregate federal revenue levels exceeding a specified percentage of revenue relative to the Gross Domestic Product, unless so determined by a vote of at least three-fifths of the Members voting, a quorum being present."[75]

"The Path to Prosperity (Episode 1): America's two futures, visualized," April 4, 2011.

"The Path to Prosperity (Episode 2): Saving Medicare, Visualized," May 24, 2011.

"Path to Prosperity (Episode 3): 3 Steps to Pro-Growth Tax Reform -- VISUALIZED," September 13, 2011.

Agricultural subsidies

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Agricultural subsidies
  • Paul Ryan's 2012 budget resolution proposed reforming "the open-ended nature of the government's support for crop insurance" and claimed that such reforms would "save taxpayers roughly $30 billion over the next decade."[69]

Federal assistance programs

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Federal assistance programs
  • In July 2014, Paul Ryan released a discussion draft for a proposal targeting entitlement reform called "Opportunity Grant." Ryan proposed consolidating "up to eleven federal programs into one stream of funding to participating states. The idea would be to let states try different ways of providing aid and then to test the results—in short, more flexibility in exchange for more accountability. My thinking is, get rid of these bureaucratic formulas. Put the emphasis on results. ...Each state that wanted to participate would submit a plan to the federal government. That plan would lay out in detail the state’s proposed alternative. If everything passed muster, the federal government would give the green light. And the state would get more flexibility; it would get to combine into one stream of funding up to eleven different programs—things like food stamps, housing assistance, child care, cash welfare. This new, simpler stream of funding would become the Opportunity Grant, and it would be budget neutral. The state would get the same amount of money as under current law—not a penny less."[76]
  • Ryan introduced HR 6610 - the Roadmap for America's Future Act of 2008. The bill outlined changes to entitlement spending and focused on Medicare and Social Security.[77]

Foreign affairs

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Foreign affairs

Military preparedness and budget

  • In 2011, Paul Ryan voted for S 365 - the Budget Control Act of 2011, which provided for budget sequestrations, including defense spending sequestration.[78]
  • Ryan argued that issues of foreign policy are connected to the national budget. In a 2011 speech, he said, "If there's one thing I could say with complete confidence about American foreign policy, it is this: Our fiscal policy and our foreign policy are on a collision course; and if we fail to put our budget on a sustainable path, then we are choosing decline as a world power."[79]
  • In 2008, Ryan voted for HR 1 - the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007, which provided for specific military preparedness in regards to terror threats.[80]

National security


"Vice Presidential Debate - Opening V.P. Debate on Benghazi Terrorist Attack," October 11, 2012.
  • In June 2014, Ryan stated that the U.S. military should stay in Afghanistan until the military has achieved its objectives. He said, "No country can lean on us forever. But the Afghan people are trying to stand on their own. And we should help them to their feet."[82]
  • In 2001, Ryan supported SJRes 23, which authorized military activity in Afghanistan following the September 11 terrorist attacks.[84]
  • In 2002, Ryan voted for HJRes 114 - the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002, which authorized military force in Iraq.[85]

International relations

  • In June 2014, Paul Ryan said, "We need to make it very clear that the NATO pledge to common defense is not some paper promise, it is an iron-clad commitment."[86]

Domestic

Federalism

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Federalism
First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution
  • In 2007, Paul Ryan voted for HR 2102 - the Free Flow of Information Act of 2007, which proposed prohibiting "a federal entity (an entity or employee of the judicial or executive branch or an administrative agency of the federal government), in any matter arising under federal law, from compelling a covered person to testify or produce any document" with a few exceptions.[87]
  • In 2005, Ryan cosponsored HR 2389 - the Pledge Protection Act of 2005, which sought to "deny jurisdiction to any federal court, and appellate jurisdiction to the Supreme Court, to hear or decide any question pertaining to the interpretation of the Pledge of Allegiance or its validity under the Constitution."[88]
Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution
  • In 2012, Paul Ryan publicly stated his support for federal concealed-carry reciprocity legislation, which proposed allowing a person with a permit to carry a concealed firearm in one state to carry a firearm in every other state.[89]
  • In 2004, Ryan voted for HR 1036 - the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, which proposed prohibiting "any qualified civil liability action from being brought in any State or Federal court." The bill proposed protecting firearms manufacturers from lawsuits in cases regarding the criminal misuse of a firearm.[90]
Executive powers
  • In 2014, Paul Ryan voted in favor of HR 4138 - the ENFORCE the Law Act of 2014, which authorized either chamber of Congress "to bring a civil action for a declaratory judgment" on the president if the president failed to "faithfully execute the laws of the United States."[91]
Crime and Justice

American Enterprise Institute, "Paul Ryan: Expanding opportunity in America," July 24, 2014.
  • In Paul Ryan's 2014 presentation, "Expanding Opportunity in America," Ryan proposed reforming the criminal justice system. He specifically proposed giving judges more flexibility in sentencing low-risk, non-violent offenders. He said, "Here’s the point: Non-violent, low-risk offenders—don’t lock them up and throw away the key. Get them in counseling; get them in job training; help them rejoin and contribute to our society."[92]

Natural resources

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Natural resources
Energy development
  • In 2013, Paul Ryan voted in favor of H.R.1582 - the Energy Consumers Relief Act of 2013, a bill that required the EPA to prepare cost/benefit analyses, a price increase estimate and a description of employment effects "before promulgating a final rule that regulates any aspect of the production, supply, distribution, or use of energy (or that provides for such regulation by state or local governments)" that would cost more than $1 billion.[93]
  • Ryan's 2012 "Path to Prosperity" budget criticized the Obama administration's energy policies, citing "punitive regulations on economically competitive sources of energy, coupled with reckless spending on uncompetitive alternatives."[69]
  • In 2008, Ryan voted against HR 6899 - the Comprehensive American Energy Security and Consumer Protection Act, which proposed restricting any "oil and gas preleasing or leasing of any area of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) that was not available for oil and gas leasing as of July 1, 2008, unless that action is expressly authorized by this Act or a statute enacted by Congress after enactment of this Act."[94]
  • In 2007, Ryan voted against HR 2776 - the Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation Tax Act of 2007, which proposed tax incentives "for the production of electricity from renewable resources (e.g., wind, closed and open-loop biomass, geothermal energy, small irrigation power, municipal solid waste, and qualified hydropower)."[95]
Climate change
Keystone XL Pipeline
Endangered Species
  • In 2009, Paul Ryan voted against S 22 - the Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009, a bill that sought to expand federally protected lands and waters.[97]

Healthcare

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Healthcare
  • The proposal also included changes to Medicare. The proposal stated: "workers currently under the age of 55, beginning in 2023, those seniors would be given a choice of private plans competing alongside the traditional fee-for-service option on a newly created Medicare Exchange. Medicare would provide a premium-support payment either to pay for or offset the premium of the plan chosen by the senior."[69]

Immigration

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Immigration
  • In 2010, Paul Ryan voted against the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act of 2010, or DREAM Act of 2010. The act authorized "the Secretary of Homeland Security (DHS) to cancel the removal of, and adjust to conditional nonimmigrant status" of certain aliens under the age of 30.[98]
  • In 2006, Ryan voted in favor of HR 6061 - the Secure Fence Act of 2006, which gave the Secretary of Homeland Security the ability to provide "physical infrastructure enhancements to prevent unlawful border entry and facilitate border access by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, such as additional checkpoints, all weather access roads, and vehicle barriers."[99]
  • In 2005, Ryan co-sponsored HR 884 - the Agricultural Job Opportunities, Benefits, and Security Act of 2005, which proposed providing pathways to legal immigration by giving "qualifying alien agricultural workers (and their spouses and minor children) temporary resident status and subsequently lawful permanent resident status upon the fulfillment of specified agricultural work and residency requirements."[100]

Education

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Education
  • As of April 2015, Paul Ryan supported making education a more local issue. On his website, Ryan championed "returning the power to make education-related decisions to state and local governments, families, and students, who oftentimes know what is best for our nation’s children, rather than distant federal bureaucrats."[101]
  • In a 2014 interview with Hugh Hewitt, Ryan explained his opposition to Common Core Standards. He said, "I don’t support Common Core. I think it leads to federalizing curriculum, which I think is a very dangerous trend to put ourselves on."[102]

Abortion

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Abortion

"Election 2012, VP Debate: Biden and Ryan Discuss Abortion Views, The New York Times," October 11, 2012.
  • In a 2010 interview with John McCormack of The Weekly Standard, Paul Ryan explained his position on abortion. He said, "I’m as pro-life as a person gets. You’re not going to have a truce. Judges are going to come up. Issues come up, they’re unavoidable, and I’m never going to not vote pro-life."[103]
  • In 2006, Ryan voted for S 403 - the Child Interstate Abortion Notification Act, which "Amends the federal criminal code to prohibit transporting a minor child across a state line to obtain an abortion (deems such transporting to be a de facto abridgment of the right of a parent under any law in the minor’s state of residence that requires parental involvement in the minor’s abortion decision). Makes an exception for an abortion necessary to safe the life of the minor."[104]
  • In 2003, Ryan voted for S 3 - the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003, which prohibited "any physician or other individual from knowingly performing a partial-birth abortion, except when necessary to save the life of a mother whose life is endangered by a physical disorder, illness, or injury."[105]

Gay rights

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Gay rights

"Paul Ryan on Civil Rights at Town Hall Meeting, 2013."
  • In 2013, Paul Ryan changed his stance on same-sex adoption, showing support for the issue at a Wisconsin town hall meeting. He said, "I do believe that if there are children who are orphans who do not have a loving person or couple ... I think if a person wants to love and raise a child, they ought to be able to do that. Period. I would vote that way."[106]
  • In 2006, Ryan voted for HJRes 88 - the Marriage Protection Amendment, which proposed declaring "that: (1) marriage in the United States shall consist only of the union of a man and a woman; and (2) neither the U.S. Constitution nor the constitution of any state shall be construed to require that marriage or the legal incidents of marriage be conferred upon any other union."[107]
  • Speaking on his decision to vote for the amendment, Ryan said, "I believe that marriage should remain between a man and a woman, and I have heard from many of the people I represent who are concerned about activist judges abusing their power and rewriting our society’s definition of marriage. I had hoped that this amendment wouldn’t be necessary, but increasingly it appears that laws such as the Defense of Marriage Act will not be sufficient to protect marriage from certain courts that distort state and federal constitutional law."[108]

On The Issues Vote Match

Paul Ryan's Vote Match results from On The Issues.
See also: On The Issues Vote Match

On The Issues conducts a VoteMatch analysis of elected officials based on 20 issue areas. Rather than relying on incumbents to complete the quiz themselves, the VoteMatch analysis is conducted using voting records, statements to the media, debate transcripts or citations from books authored by or about the candidate. Based on the results of the quiz, Ryan is a Hard-Core Conservative. Ryan received a score of 14 percent on social issues and 93 percent on economic issues.[43] Note: We are working to resolve inaccuracies with this information. Thank you for your patience.

On The Issues organization logo.


Personal savvy

Character

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Character

Principles

  • Paul Ryan has been devoted to balancing the budget and reducing federal spending. He outlined these principles thoroughly in the Path to Prosperity budget proposal that he created as chairman of the House Budget Committee.[69]
  • He has a reputation as "the Republican Party's leading voice on taxes and budgets," according to David Lawder of Reuters.[109]

Ethics

  • In October 2014, the Washington watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington accused Paul Ryan of "accepting improper favors from the nation's largest bookseller" when Amazon marketed his book and dropped the price to increase sales.[110]

Communications

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Communications

Overall presence

  • In a 2012 article for Forbes, Carmine Gallo praised Paul Ryan's communication skills. Gallo wrote, "You might not agree with Ryan’s philosophy on the role of the federal government or his plan to reduce the government debt, but it’s hard to make the argument that he isn’t a clear communicator."[111]

Past speeches and interviews


"CPAC 2014 - U.S. Representative Paul Ryan (R-WI)," March 6, 2014.

Ryan at the 2012 Republican National Convention, August 29, 2012.

Past debates

  • Before his 2012 debate against Vice President Joe Biden, Juana Summers of Politico wrote, "To those who know best — his past debate foes — Paul Ryan is an agile debater, able to balance explaining the complex federal budget process while still looking like the youthful boy next door."[112]
  • In the same article, Lydia Spottswood, Ryan's 1998 Democratic opponent, said, "What Paul Ryan does is he portrays himself to people as if he were a Washington outsider, he talks as if he’s in another room when decisions are being made in Washington. This is an intentionally misleading tactic."[112]

"Election 2012, Biden vs. Ryan: Complete Vice Presidential Debate, The New York Times," October 11, 2012.

CNN, "Paul Ryan debates Debbie Wasserman Schultz on Social Security Reform," September 28, 2010.

CNBC, "Paul Ryan and Robert Reich debate taxes, spending and the economy," April 29, 2010.

Political and leadership attributes

See also: Paul Ryan possible presidential campaign, 2016/Leadership
Leadership positions
Significant events
Coalition building
  • In 2013, Paul Ryan reached a bipartisan budget agreement with Democratic Sen. Patty Murray. Ryan released a statement following the agreement he helped negotiate. He said, "As a conservative, I deal with the situation as it exists. I deal with the way things are, not necessarily the way I want them to be. I've passed three budgets in a row that reflect my priorities and my principles and everything I wanted to accomplish. We're in divided government. I realize I'm not going to get that. So I'm not going to go a mile in the direction I wanted to go to, but I will take a few steps in the right direction. This agreement takes us in the right direction, from my perspective, for the very reasons I laid out before."[116]
Elections and campaign finance
  • According to Open Secrets, Ryan's leadership PAC, Prosperity Action, raised more than $9 million from 2002 to April 2015.[118]

Recent news

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All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

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See also

References

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  2. Politico, "2012 House Race Results," accessed November 6, 2012
  3. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, "Paul Ryan," accessed November 18, 2011
  4. Time, "Paul Ryan: The Prophet," December 4, 2011
  5. Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress, "Ryan," accessed June 26, 2013
  6. CQ.com, "House Committee Rosters for the 113th Congress," accessed March 3, 2013
  7. U.S. House of Representatives, "Committee assignments," accessed March 31, 2014
  8. Official House website, "Committee Assignments," accessed November 18, 2011
  9. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, First Session of the 112th Congress," accessed September 5, 2013
  10. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, Second Session of the 113th Congress," accessed March 4, 2014
  11. Project Vote Smart, "HR 1960 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  12. Project Vote Smart, "HR 2217 - DHS Appropriations Act (2014) Act of 2014 - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  13. Project Vote Smart, "H Amdt 69 - Requires Threat Assessment of Pipeline Vulnerabilities to a Terrorist Attack - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  14. Project Vote Smart, "HR 624 - CISPA (2013) - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  15. Clerk of U.S. House, "Roll Call Vote 31: H.R. 2642," accessed February 12, 2014
  16. Politico, "House clears farm bill," accessed February 12, 2014
  17. 17.0 17.1 New York Times, "Senate passes long-stalled farm bill, with clear winners and losers," accessed February 12, 2014
  18. 18.0 18.1 CNN.com, "House passes compromise $1.1 trillion budget for 2014," accessed January 20, 2014
  19. 19.0 19.1 U.S. House, "Roll Call Vote 21," accessed January 20, 2014
  20. Roll Call, "House passes $1.1 trillion omnibus," accessed January 20, 2014
  21. 21.0 21.1 21.2 LA Times, "Rep. Paul Ryan calls for cuts in anti-poverty programs," accessed March 4, 2014
  22. Clerk of the U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013
  23. Buzzfeed, "Government Shutdown: How We Got Here," accessed October 1, 2013
  24. Clerk of the U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013
  25. The Washington Post, "Reid, McConnell propose bipartisan Senate bill to end shutdown, extend borrowing," accessed October 16, 2013
  26. U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 550," accessed October 31, 2013
  27. Politico, "Hill pols plan to donate, halt salary," accessed October 1, 2013
  28. Huffington Post, "Paul Ryan: Debt Limit Is 'Forcing Mechanism' For Ending Government Shutdown," accessed October 1, 2013
  29. Politico, "Paul Ryan: I haven’t dropped Obamacare," accessed October 9, 2013
  30. The Hill, "Ryan: No need to worry about another shutdown," accessed November 20, 2013
  31. Project Vote Smart, "HR 2642 - Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013 - Voting Record," accessed October 14, 2013
  32. New York Times, "House Republicans Push Through Farm Bill, Without Food Stamps," accessed September 17, 2013
  33. Political Wire, "Ryan Praises Bipartisan Deal," accessed December 11, 2013
  34. 34.0 34.1 Politico, "The new Paul Ryan," accessed December 11, 2013
  35. The Library of Congress, "H.AMDT.136," accessed September 16, 2013
  36. Project Vote Smart, "H Amdt 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  37. Project Vote Smart, "H Amdt 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  38. Project Vote Smart, "HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  39. U.S. House, "House Resolution 676," accessed July 30, 2014
  40. Yahoo News, "Suing Obama: GOP-led House gives the go-ahead," accessed July 30, 2014
  41. Washington Post, "House clears way for lawsuit against Obama," accessed July 30, 2014
  42. U.S. House, "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff," accessed January 4, 2013
  43. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named ontheissues
  44. Politico, "Book deal for Paul Ryan," accessed September 22, 2013
  45. 45.0 45.1 Politico, "GOP 2016 hopefuls slated for NYC event," accessed August 28, 2013
  46. National Journal, "Paul Ryan Takes a Step Toward House Speakership," accessed December 13, 2013
  47. 47.0 47.1 47.2 47.3 Politico, "Paul Ryan doesn’t want to be House speaker," accessed January 24, 2014
  48. 48.0 48.1 Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Ryan: Obama running an 'increasingly lawless presidency'," accessed February 3, 2014
  49. New York Daily News, "Mitt Romney scores key Republican endorsement in Rep. Paul Ryan," March 30, 2012
  50. 50.0 50.1 50.2 50.3 Simpson for Congress, "Simpson Announces Support of Congressman Paul Ryan," accessed March 10, 2014
  51. Madison.com, "Paul Ryan ripped by conservative after endorsement in Alabama congressional race," accessed August 19, 2013
  52. 52.0 52.1 AL.com, "Paul Ryan starts a ruckus in Alabama congressional race," accessed August 19, 2013
  53. Roll Call, "Paul Ryan Endorses Candidate in Competitive New York House Race," accessed January 15, 2014
  54. Clerk.House.gov, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed May 3, 2015
  55. New York Daily News, "Election 2016: A look at possible candidates and who could run in the next presidential race," August 17, 2013
  56. The Wall Street Journal, "Rep. Paul Ryan Rules Out 2016 Presidential Candidacy," January 12, 2015
  57. U.S. House of Representatives, Office of the Clerk, "House members who became president or presidential candidates," accessed November 7, 2013
  58. MSNBC.com, "Paul Ryan bows out of 2016 consideration," January 12, 2015
  59. The Huffington Post, "Paul Ryan To Chair Powerful House Ways And Means Committee," November 18, 2014
  60. The Daily Caller, "Book Deal for Paul Ryan," August 7, 2014
  61. New York Daily News, "What likely 2016 White House contenders are saying about possible campaigns," accessed May 3, 2015
  62. Politico, "GOP 2016 hopefuls slated for NYC event," August 26, 2013
  63. 63.0 63.1 PaulRyan.House.gov, "Chairman-elect Ryan Makes Staff Appointments at House Ways and Means Committee," accessed May 3, 2015
  64. CNN, "CNN Poll: Rand Paul goes where his father never went," March 16, 2014
  65. Business Insider, "Paul Ryan: 'Tax reform is a 2015 thing for sure,'" February 14, 2015
  66. U.S. Congress, "H.R.1836 - Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001," accessed April 24, 2015
  67. U.S. Congress, "H.R.2 - Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003," accessed April 24, 2015
  68. U.S. Congress, "H.R.8 - American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012," accessed April 24, 2015
  69. 69.0 69.1 69.2 69.3 69.4 69.5 69.6 69.7 U.S. House of Representatives Committee on the Budget, "The Path to Prosperity: A Blueprint for American Renewal," accessed April 24, 2015
  70. Congress.gov, "H.R.6684 - Spending Reduction Act of 2012," accessed April 24, 2015
  71. Congress.gov, "H.R.2898 - Regulation Moratorium and Jobs Preservation Act of 2011," accessed April 24, 2015
  72. U.S. Congress, "H.R.434 - Trade and Development Act of 2000," accessed April 24, 2015
  73. Congress.gov, "H.R.1830 - To extend the authorities of the Andean Trade Preference Act until February 29, 2008," accessed April 24, 2015
  74. Congress.gov, "H.Con.Res.34 - Establishing the budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2012 and setting forth appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2013 through 2021," accessed April 24, 2015
  75. Congress.gov, "H.R.6110 - Roadmap for America's Future Act of 2008," accessed April 24, 2015
  76. House.gov, "Speeches and Statements," accessed December 11, 2014
  77. Congress.gov, "H.R.6110 - Roadmap for America's Future Act of 2008," August 6, 2012
  78. Congress.gov, "S.365 - Budget Control Act of 2011," accessed April 27, 2015
  79. CNN, "Ryan's foreign policy views shaped by his budget battles," accessed April 27, 2015
  80. Congress.gov, "H.R.1 - Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007," accessed April 27, 2015
  81. Madison.com, "First Ron Johnson, now Paul Ryan supports Obama on ISIS," September 29, 2014
  82. Wall Street Journal, "Paul Ryan Preaches Tough Restraint on World Stage," June 10, 2014
  83. The Guardian, “Benghazi attack: the key exchanges from the vice-presidential debate," October 12, 2012
  84. Congress.gov, "S.J.Res.23 - Authorization for Use of Military Force," accessed April 27, 2015
  85. Congress.gov, "H.J.Res.114 - Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002," accessed April 27, 2015
  86. Defense News, "Ryan: NATO Needs More Permanent Presence in Eastern Europe," accessed April 27, 2015
  87. Congress.gov, "H.R.2102 - Free Flow of Information Act of 2007," accessed April 27, 2015
  88. Congress.gov, "H.R.2389 - Pledge Protection Act of 2005," accessed April 27, 2015
  89. Business Week, “Paul Ryan and the Gun Control Factor," August 13, 2012
  90. Congress.gov, “H.R.1036 - Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act," accessed April 27, 2015
  91. Congress.gov, "H.R.4138 - ENFORCE the Law Act of 2014," accessed April 27, 2015
  92. House.gov, "Speeches and Statements," accessed December 11, 2014
  93. Congress.gov, "H.R.1582 - Energy Consumers Relief Act of 2013," accessed April 27, 2015
  94. Congress.gov, "H.R.6899 - Comprehensive American Energy Security and Consumer Protection Act," accessed April 27, 2015
  95. Congress.gov, "H.R.2776 - Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation Tax Act of 2007," accessed April 27, 2015
  96. U.S. Congress, "H.R.2454 - American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009," accessed April 27, 2015
  97. Congress.gov, "S.22 - Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009," accessed April 27, 2015
  98. Congress.gov, "H.R.5281 - Removal Clarification Act of 2010," accessed February 2, 2015
  99. Congress.gov, "H.R.6061 - Secure Fence Act of 2006," accessed April 27, 2015
  100. Congress.gov, "H.R.884 - Agricultural Job Opportunities, Benefits, and Security Act of 2005," accessed April 27, 2015
  101. U.S. Congressman Paul Ryan, "Education," accessed April 28, 2015
  102. Hugh Hewitt, "Audio and Transcript: Paul Ryan On 'The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea,'" August 25, 2014
  103. Weekly Standard, "Paul Ryan Rules Out 2012 Presidential Run, Talks Up Mitch Daniels," July 19, 2010
  104. Congress.gov, "S.403 - Child Interstate Abortion Notification Act," accessed April 28, 2015
  105. Congress.gov, "S.3 - Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003," accessed April 28, 2015
  106. USA Today, "Rep. Paul Ryan now supports gay adoption," accessed April 28, 2015
  107. Congress.gov, "H.J.Res.88 - Marriage Protection Amendment," accessed April 28, 2015
  108. House.gov, "Ryan Votes for Marriage Protection Amendment," accessed April 28, 2015
  109. Business Insider, "Paul Ryan: 'Tax reform is a 2015 thing for sure'," accessed April 28, 2015
  110. Washington Times, "Paul Ryan abused power to increase book sales, ethics group charges," accessed April 28, 2015
  111. Forbes, "Paul Ryan: The 'Soft' Skill That Makes Him Hard to Ignore," accessed April 28, 2015
  112. 112.0 112.1 Politico, "Vice Presidential Debate 2012: Paul Ryan a tough debater, ex-rivals say," accessed April 28, 2015
  113. 113.0 113.1 113.2 U.S. Congressman Paul Ryan, "Biography," accessed April 28, 2015
  114. The Washington Post, "Afternoon Fix: Paul Ryan to deliver State of the Union response; Evan Bayh joins private equity firm," accessed December 11, 2014
  115. Twitter, "Mitt Romney," accessed April 28, 2015
  116. Political Wire, "Ryan Praises Bipartisan Deal," accessed December 11, 2013
  117. NBC News, "Paul Ryan Won't Run for President in 2016," January 12, 2015
  118. Open Secrets, "Rep. Paul Ryan," accessed December 11, 2014
  119. Federal Election Commission, "Paul Ryan," accessed December 11, 2014
  120. CNN, "Wisconsin House Results," accessed April 28, 2015

2014

See also: Wisconsin's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

Ryan ran in the 2014 election for the U.S. House to represent Wisconsin's 1st District. Ryan defeated Jeremy Ryan in the Republican primary.[1] He will face Rob Zerban (D) in the general election. The general election took place November 4, 2014.

U.S. House, Wisconsin District 1 Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngPaul Ryan Incumbent 94.3% 40,813
Jeremy Ryan 5.7% 2,450
Scattering 0.1% 30
Total Votes 43,293
Source: Wisconsin Government Accountability Board

2012

See also: Wisconsin's 1st Congressional District elections, 2012

Ryan won re-election in 2012.[2] He was unopposed in the Republican primary and defeated Democrat Rob Zerban and Libertarian Keith Deschler in the November general election.[3]

While Ryan was selected by Mitt Romney on August 11 to be his running mate, Wisconsin law allowed Ryan to pursue his House re-election at the same time. If Ryan had been elected for both offices, the state would have held a special election to fill his U.S. House seat.[4]

In 2011 redistricting, The Hill published a list of the "Top Ten House Members" who were helped by redistricting.[5] Ryan ranked 9th on the list.[5] The article noted that the redistricting process, controlled by Republicans in the state House, was rushed through rather quickly ahead of recalls happening in the state, and added a few more points to the Republican base in Ryan's district.[5]

U.S. House, Wisconsin District 1 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Rob Zerban 43.4% 158,414
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngPaul Ryan Incumbent 54.9% 200,423
     Libertarian Keith Deschler 1.7% 6,054
     Miscellaneous N/A 0% 167
Total Votes 365,058
Source: Wisconsin Government Accountability Board "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election" (dead link)

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Ryan is available dating back to 2000. Based on available campaign finance records, Ryan raised a total of $15,995,498 during that time period. This information was last updated on April 5, 2013.[13]

Paul Ryan's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 US House (Wisconsin, District 1) Won $4,994,668
2010 US House (Wisconsin, District 1) Won $3,922,760
2008 US House (Wisconsin, District 1) Won $1,653,204
2006 US House (Wisconsin, District 1) Won $1,462,674
2004 US House (Wisconsin, District 1) Won $1,374,025
2002 US House (Wisconsin, District 1) Won $1,244,748
2000 US House (Wisconsin, District 1) Won $1,343,419
Grand Total Raised $15,995,498

2014

Candidates for Congress were required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Ryan's reports.[14]

Ryan raised the most amount of money of all eight Wisconsin congressional members, with $1.7 million in contributions since January 2013.[22]

2012

Breakdown of the source of Ryan's campaign funds before the 2012 election.

Ryan won re-election to the U.S. House in 2012. During that re-election cycle, Ryan's campaign committee raised a total of $4,994,668 and spent $6,651,221.[23]

Cost per vote

Ryan spent $33.19 per vote received in 2012.

2010

Breakdown of the source of Ryan's campaign funds before the 2010 election.

Ryan won re-election to the U.S. House in 2010. During that re-election cycle, Ryan's campaign committee raised a total of $3,922,760 and spent $1,781,673.[24]

Personal Gain Index

Congressional Personal Gain Index graphic.png
See also: Personal Gain Index (U.S. Congress)

The Personal Gain Index (U.S. Congress) is a four-part measurement that illustrates the extent to which members of the U.S. Congress have prospered during their tenure as public servants.
It consists of four different metrics:

PGI: Change in net worth

See also: Changes in Net Worth of U.S. Senators and Representatives (Personal Gain Index) and Net worth of United States Senators and Representatives
Net Worth Metric graphic.png

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Ryan's net worth as of 2012 was estimated between $2,206,097 to $8,605,000. That averages to $5,405,548.50, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican House members in 2012 of $7,614,097.96. Ryan ranked as the 69th most wealthy representative in 2012.[25] Between 2004 and 2012, Ryan‘s calculated net worth[26] increased by an average of 22 percent per year. Between 2004 and 2012, the average annual percentage increase for a member of Congress was 15.4 percent.[27]

Paul Ryan Yearly Net Worth
YearAverage Net Worth
2004$1,950,206
2012$5,405,548
Growth from 2004 to 2012:177%
Average annual growth:22%[28]
Comparatively, the American citizen experienced a median yearly decline in net worth of -0.94%.[29]
The data used to calculate changes in net worth may include changes resulting from assets gained through marriage, inheritance, changes in family estates and/or trusts, changes in family business ownership and many other variables unrelated to a member's behavior in Congress.

Analysis

Like-minded colleagues

The website OpenCongress tracks the voting records of each member to determine with whom he or she votes most and least often. The results include a member from each party.[30]

Ryan most often votes with:

Ryan least often votes with:

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Ryan is a "rank-and-file Republican," as of July 2014.[31] This was the same rating Ryan received in May 2013.[32]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Click the link above for the full ratings of all members of Congress.

2013

Ryan ranked 71st in the conservative rankings in 2013.[33]

2012

Ryan was one of two members who ranked 127th in the conservative rankings in 2012.[34]

2011

Ryan was one of three members of congress who ranked 150th in the conservative rankings in 2011.[35]

Voting with party

The website OpenCongress tracks how often members of Congress vote with the majority of the chamber caucus.

2013

Ryan voted with the Republican Party 94.9 percent of the time, which ranked 86th among the 234 House Republican members as of July 2014.[36]

2013

Ryan voted with the Republican Party 96.2 percent of the time, which ranked 103rd among the 234 House Republican members as of June 2013.[37]

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Ryan missed 230 of 10,854 roll call votes from January 1999 to July 2014. This amounts to 2.1%, which is worse than the median of 2.5% among current congressional representatives as of July 2014.[38]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Ryan paid his congressional staff a total of $858,307 in 2011. Overall, Wisconsin ranked 32nd in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[39]

Personal

Ryan and his wife, Janna, have three children.[40] He spent a summer working for Oscar Meyer and once drove the Weinermobile, a vehicle shaped like a hot dog in a bun.[41]

2013 best year

Ryan was named by The Hill as a member of Congress who had one of the best years in 2013.[42]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Paul + Ryan + Wisconsin + House

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

Paul Ryan News Feed

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See also

External links


References

  1. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named apwi
  2. Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, "Ryan's 2012 re-election not a given in tense climate," July 24, 2011
  3. Wisconsin Government Accountability Board, "Candidates registered by office," accessed June 10, 2012
  4. Huffington Post, "Paul Ryan House Race Can Proceed Despite VP Nomination," August 11, 2012
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 The Hill, "House members most helped by redistricting," accessed April 17, 2012
  6. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  7. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  8. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  9. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  10. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. Open Secrets, "Career Fundraising for Paul Ryan," accessed April 5, 2013
  14. Federal Election Commission, "Ryan 2014 Summary reports," accessed July 25, 2013
  15. Federal Election Commission, "April Quarterly," accessed July 25, 2013
  16. Federal Election Commission, "July Quarterly," accessed July 25, 2013
  17. Federal Election Commission, "October Quarterly," accessed October 30, 2013
  18. Federal Election Commission, "Year-End Report," accessed February 19, 2014
  19. Federal Election Commission, "April Quarterly," accessed April 18, 2014
  20. Federal Election Commission, "July Quarterly," accessed July 23, 2014
  21. Federal Election Commission, "Pre-General," accessed October 24, 2014
  22. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Paul Ryan cashes in on White House run," accessed August 5, 2013
  23. Open Secrets, "Ryan 2012 Campaign Contributions," accessed February 23, 2013
  24. Open Secrets, "Paul Ryan 2010 Election Cycle," accessed November 18, 2011
  25. OpenSecrets, "Ryan, 2012," accessed January 14, 2014
  26. This figure represents the total percentage growth from either 2004 (if the member entered office in 2004 or earlier) or their first year in office (as noted in the chart below).
  27. This number was found by dividing each member's total net worth growth percentage by the number of years included in the calculation.
  28. This figure represents the total percentage growth divided by the number of years for which there are net worth figures for each member.
  29. This figure was calculated using median asset data from the Census Bureau. Please see the Congressional Net Worth data for Ballotpedia spreadsheet for more information on this calculation.
  30. OpenCongress, "Paul Ryan," accessed July 22, 2014
  31. GovTrack, "Paul Ryan," accessed July 22, 2014
  32. GovTrack, "Paul Ryan," accessed May 9, 2013
  33. National Journal, "2013 Congressional Vote Ratings," July 22, 2014
  34. National Journal, "2012 Congressional Vote Ratings," February 28, 2013
  35. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," accessed February 23, 2012
  36. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  37. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  38. GovTrack, "Ryan," accessed July 22, 2014
  39. LegiStorm, "Paul Ryan," accessed September 7, 2012
  40. Official House website, "Biography," accessed November 18, 2011
  41. CBS Pittsburgh, "Paul Ryan: Former Wienermobile Driver, Future Vice President?," accessed October 10, 2013
  42. The Hill, "Best, worst years in Washington," accessed January 13, 2014
Political offices
Preceded by
Mark Neumann
U.S. House of Representatives - Wisconsin, 1st District
1999-Present
Succeeded by
-