Difference between revisions of "Protest vote"

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
m
m
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 
[[File:Vote button.jpg|right|150px|link=Portal:Elections]]{{tnr}}
 
[[File:Vote button.jpg|right|150px|link=Portal:Elections]]{{tnr}}
  
A '''Protest vote''' is a [[voting|vote]] cast in an [[election]] to demonstrate the caster's unhappiness with the choice of candidates or refusal of the current political system.<ref>[http://www.davemanuel.com/investor-dictionary/protest-vote/ ''Dave Manuel.com'', "Protest vote", accessed March 28, 2014]</ref>
+
A '''protest vote''' is defined as "a ballot cast for a candidate with a minimal chance of winning, to register dislike for the other candidates."<ref>[http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/protest+vote ''Dictionary.com'', "Protest vote," accessed May 1, 2014]</ref><ref name="duke">[http://sites.duke.edu/niou/files/2011/06/E21.pdf ''Duke.edu'', "Protest voting in plurality elections: a theory of voter signaling," accessed May 1, 2014]</ref>
 
+
Along with abstention, which is simply the act of not voting, or of refusing to vote, it is often considered to be a clear sign of the lack of popular legitimacy and roots of representative democracy, as not voting endangers the credibility of the whole voting system. If protest vote takes the form of a blank vote, it may or not be tallied into final results. Thus, it may either result in a spoilt vote (which is the case most of the times) or, if the electoral system accepts to take it into account, as a "None of the Above" vote.<ref>[http://www.blankvote.org.uk/blank_votes_count.html ''Blank Vote.org'', "BLANK Votes Count", accessed March 28, 2014]</ref>
+
  
 
==Several way to cast a protest votes==
 
==Several way to cast a protest votes==
Protest vote can be formulated in several ways:
+
A protest vote can be formulated in several ways:<ref name="duke"/>
 
+
* Voting for a minority or fringe candidate that has no chance of getting elected under standard situation.
+
* Posting a blank ballot paper, without marking a choice.
+
* Spoiling the ballot paper.
+
* Selecting a "None of the Above," or "Blank vote" option, if one exists.
+
  
''However'', some jurisdictions may give different interpretations to each of the methods mentioned above.
+
* A voter could vote for a minority or third party candidate that has a minimal chance of winning the election.
 +
* A voter could submit a blank ballot paper without choosing a candidate on the ballot.
 +
* A voter could "spoil" the ballot, which means a vote is considered invalid and is not included in the final vote count.
 +
* A voter could choose a "None of the Above," or "Blank vote" option, if one exists on the ballot.
  
In addition, sometimes, a person may use even more uncommon, often illegal, methods to show the displeasure. For example, a voter could include ripping the ballot apart, asking other people to vote for them, selling their vote (for example: putting his vote on auction sites) or even eating the ballot.
+
In addition, sometimes, a voter may even use uncommon, and often illegal, methods to show their displeasure. For example, a voter could include ripping the ballot apart, asking other people to vote for them, sell their vote (putting the vote on an auction site) or even eating the ballot.<ref>[http://edibleballot.tao.ca/eat.html ''Edible Ballot'', "The Goal: Destroying your Ballot," accessed May 1, 2014]</ref><ref>[http://www.nationmultimedia.com/2006/04/03/politics/politics_30000798.php ''The Nation'', "Academic rips up ballot paper," accessed May 1, 2014]</ref><ref>[http://www.blankvote.org.uk/blank_votes_count.html ''Vote Blank'', "Blank Votes Count," accessed May 1, 2014]</ref><ref>[http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/316376/none-above-should-be-ballot-john-fund ''National Review'', " ‘None of the Above’ Should Be on the Ballot," accessed May 1, 2014]</ref>
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==
Line 30: Line 26:
 
*[http://www.politics.as.nyu.edu/docs/IO/29165/myatt.pdf ''NYU.edu'', "A Theory of Protest Voting" by David P. Myatt]
 
*[http://www.politics.as.nyu.edu/docs/IO/29165/myatt.pdf ''NYU.edu'', "A Theory of Protest Voting" by David P. Myatt]
 
*[http://jtp.sagepub.com/content/16/1/79.abstract ''Journal of Theoretical Politics'', "Protest Voting and Abstention Under Plurality Rule Elections: An Alternative Public Choice Approach" by Won-Taek Kang]
 
*[http://jtp.sagepub.com/content/16/1/79.abstract ''Journal of Theoretical Politics'', "Protest Voting and Abstention Under Plurality Rule Elections: An Alternative Public Choice Approach" by Won-Taek Kang]
*[http://www.dartmouth.edu/~govt/Protest%20Voting%20in%20Plurality%20Elections%20-%20Niou%20and%20Kselman.pdf ''Dartmouth.edu'', "Protest Voting in Plurality Elections: A Theory of Voter Signaling" by Daniel Kselman]
+
*[http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11127-010-9661-2#page-1 ''Springer.com'', "Protest Voting in Plurality Elections: A Theory of Voter Signaling" by Daniel Kselman]
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
 
[[Category:Terms and definitions]]
 
[[Category:Terms and definitions]]

Latest revision as of 12:52, 1 May 2014

Vote button.jpg

A protest vote is defined as "a ballot cast for a candidate with a minimal chance of winning, to register dislike for the other candidates."[1][2]

Several way to cast a protest votes

A protest vote can be formulated in several ways:[2]

  • A voter could vote for a minority or third party candidate that has a minimal chance of winning the election.
  • A voter could submit a blank ballot paper without choosing a candidate on the ballot.
  • A voter could "spoil" the ballot, which means a vote is considered invalid and is not included in the final vote count.
  • A voter could choose a "None of the Above," or "Blank vote" option, if one exists on the ballot.

In addition, sometimes, a voter may even use uncommon, and often illegal, methods to show their displeasure. For example, a voter could include ripping the ballot apart, asking other people to vote for them, sell their vote (putting the vote on an auction site) or even eating the ballot.[3][4][5][6]

See also

Ballotpedia:Index of Terms

External links

BallotpediaAvatar bigger.png
Suggest a link

References