Difference between revisions of "Recall campaigns in Washington"

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m (Text replace - "State of Washington Recall of Officials, Amendment 8 (1912)" to "Washington Recall of Elected Officials, Amendment to Article I Secs. 33-34 (1912)")
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* [[Laws governing recall in Washington]]
 
* [[Laws governing recall in Washington]]
* [[State of Washington Recall of Officials, Amendment 8 (1912)]]
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* [[Washington Recall of Elected Officials, Amendment to Article I Secs. 33-34 (1912)]]
 
* [[Washington Recall of Elective Officers, Referendum 4 (1916)]]
 
* [[Washington Recall of Elective Officers, Referendum 4 (1916)]]
  

Revision as of 08:44, 23 September 2013

RecallBanner.jpg
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Legend:

Approveda = The recall target was recalled by voters.

Defeatedd = When a recall vote was held, voters rejected the attempt to recall the politician (that is, voters decided to keep/retain the targeted politician).

Proposed ballot measures that were not on a ballot = The recall effort did not collect enough signatures to force a recall vote.

Portal:Recall = The targeted politician resigned after a recall campaign was begun, and before the vote on the recall would have taken place.

Balance48.png

= A judge prevented the recall from going forward.

Dates.png

= A recall election is scheduled.
[edit]



Ballotpedia's 2013 Recall Analysis

State Targeted officials Recalled Retained Resigned
Alaska 2 1 0 0
Arizona 18 1 0 1
California 67 9 1 2
Colorado 19 2 1 3
Florida 5 0 0 1
Georgia 15 0 0 0
Idaho 4 0 3 0
Louisiana 11 2 0 2
Maine 21 9 1 0
Maryland 2 0 0 0
Michigan 37 5 3 0
Minnesota 1 0 0 1
Missouri 1 0 0 0
Montana 5 0 0 0
Nebraska 8 0 1 0
Nevada 2 0 0 0
New Jersey 3 0 0 0
New Mexico 5 1 0 1
North Carolina 2 0 0 0
North Dakota 7 5 2 0
Ohio 1 0 0 1
Oklahoma 2 1 0 0
Oregon 13 2 2 0
Rhode Island 4 0 4 0
South Dakota 1 0 0 0
Texas 30 2 3 0
Virginia 2 0 0 0
Washington 2 1 0 0
West Virginia 4 0 0 0
Wisconsin 7 0 4 0
Total 301 41 25 12

Ballotpedia's 2012 Recall Analysis

State Targeted officials Recalled Retained Resigned
Arkansas 9 2 4 0
Alaska 8 1 0 0
Arizona 19 6 4 2
California 87 11 4 6
Colorado 16 2 6 2
District of Columbia 3 1 0 0
Florida 1 0 0 0
Georgia 3 0 0 0
Idaho 10 2 0 0
Kansas 10 5 4 0
Louisiana 6 0 0 1
Maine 3 3 0 0
Massachusetts 7 4 0 0
Michigan 79 5 13 3
Minnesota 1 0 0 0
Missouri 4 0 0 0
Montana 4 1 0 2
Nebraska 9 1 2 0
Nevada 1 0 1 0
New Jersey 12 0 0 0
New Mexico 7 0 0 1
North Dakota 3 2 1 0
Ohio 1 0 0 0
Oklahoma 3 1 0 1
Oregon 24 3 8 4
Rhode Island 1 0 0 0
Tennessee 2 0 0 0
Texas 17 1 1 0
Washington 7 2 0 1
West Virginia 1 0 0 0
Wisconsin 12 3 4 1
Total 370 54 54 24

Fire district recall set for November 13

Washington

By Kelly O'Keefe

QUILCENE, Washington: Fire commissioners Dave Ward and Mike Whittaker are used to fighting fires, but over the past 16 months, they've had to fight a recall effort aimed at removing the pair from office. On November 13, the duo will face voters in a recall election in Jefferson County[1] The recall effort was launched in June 2011 after local citizens accused Ward and Whittaker of falsifying commissioner meeting minutes and violating the Open Public Meetings Act. According to the accusations, Ward directed a secretary to falsify meeting minutes to make it appear as if the fire board had authorized the district's participation in a Public Employees' Retirement system. Whittaker approved the minutes, despite knowing that they inaccurately reflected what had actually happened at the meeting.[2] Ward and Whittaker also came under fire for their creation of a chief operating officer job for the fire district and the hiring of Ward for that position.[3]

In accordance with the laws governing recall in Washington, a judge had to verify that the charges against the recall targets were sufficient to warrant a recall effort. Judge Anna Laurie approved one of the five charges against Ward and Whittaker. In August of this year, the Washington Supreme Court ruled that a possible violation of the Open Public Meetings Act represented sufficient cause for a recall effort. Sufficient recall signatures were submitted in September, and the single-issue, all mail-in recall election was scheduled for November 13, 2012.[4]

After the court's ruling, Shane Seaman, the lawyer for Ward and Whittaker, filed a motion for reconsideration of the Supreme Court's ruling. Seaman also filed a motion to postpone the mailing of election ballots until the Supreme Court decided whether it would reconsider the case. The motion for reconsideration was denied, and ballots were mailed as scheduled.[3]

See also