Renee Ellmers

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Renee Ellmers
Renee Ellmers.jpg
U.S. House, North Carolina, District 2
Incumbent
In office
January 3, 2011-Present
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 3
PartyRepublican
PredecessorBob Etheridge (D)
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
First electedNovember 2, 2010
Next generalNovember 4, 2014
Campaign $$1,205,245
Term limitsN/A
Education
Bachelor'sOakland University
Personal
BirthdayFebruary 9, 1964
Place of birthIronwood, Michigan
ProfessionNurse, Hospital Administrator
Net worth$-168,498
ReligionBaptist
Websites
Office website
Campaign website
Renee Ellmers (b. February 9, 1964) is a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives representing North Carolina's 2nd congressional district. Ellmers was first elected to the House in 2010 for North Carolina's 2nd congressional district and won re-election on November 6, 2012. She is currently serving her second consecutive term. [1]

Ellmers is set to run for re-election in North Carolina's 2nd congressional district in the general election on November 4, 2014.

Prior to her congressional career Ellmers served as chair of the North Carolina Planning Board.[2]

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Ellmers is one of the most reliable Republican votes, meaning she can be considered a safe vote for the Republican Party in Congress.

Biography

Ellmers was born in Ironwood, Michigan. She earned a B.A. from Oakland University in 1990.[2]

Career

After earning her degree, Ellmers worked as a registered nurse, as a hospital administrator, as a member of the Dunn, North Carolina Planning Board from 2006 to 2010 and as chair of the board from 2008 to 2010.[2]

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2013-2014

Ellmers serves on the following committees:[3]

2011-2012

Ellmers served on the following committees:[4]

Issues

Legislative actions

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "No" Ellmers voted against the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. She was 1 of 151 Republicans that voted against the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257/167 vote on January 1, 2013.[8]

113th Congress

CongressLogo.png

The 113th Congress has had 55 out of 5,401 introduced bills enacted into law (1 percent) as of November 30, 2013. Comparatively, the 112th Congress had 1.14 percent of introduced bills enacted into law in the first session.[9] For more information pertaining to Ellmers's voting record in the 113th Congress, please see the below sections.[10]

National security

National Defense Authorization Act

Voted "Yes" Ellmers voted for HR 1960 - the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014. The bill passed the House on June 14, 2013, with a vote of 315 - 108. Both parties were somewhat divided on the vote.[11]

Department of Homeland Security Appropriations

Voted "Yes" Ellmers voted for HR 2217 - the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2014. The bill passed the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 245 - 182 that was largely along party lines.[12]

Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act

Voted "Yes" Ellmers voted for HR 624 - the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act. The bill passed the House on April 18, 2013, with a vote of 288 - 127. The bill would allow federal intelligence agencies to share cybersecurity intelligence and information with private entities and utilities. The bill was largely supported by Republicans but divided the Democratic Party.[13]

Economy

Federal Statutory Pay Adjustment Elimination

Voted "Yes" Ellmers voted for HR 273 - Eliminates the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees. The bill passed the House on February 15, 2013, with a vote of 261 - 154. The bill would prevent a 0.5% pay increase for all federal workers from taking effect, saving the federal government $11 billion over 10 years.[14]

Immigration

Morton Memos Enforcement Prohibition

Voted "Yes" Ellmers voted for House Amendment 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order. The amendment was adopted by the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 224 - 201. The purpose of the amendment as stated on the official text is to "prohibit the use of funds to finalize, implement, administer, or enforce the Morton Memos." These memos would have granted administrative amnesty to certain illegal aliens residing in the United States.[15] The vote largely followed party lines.[16]

Healthcare

Health Care Reform Rules

Voted "Yes" Ellmers voted for House Amendment 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The amendment was adopted by the House on August 2, 2013, with a vote of 227-185. The amendment requires that all changes to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act be approved by Congress before taking effect. The vote was largely along party lines.[17]

Social issues

Abortion

Voted "Yes" Ellmers voted for HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act. The resolution passed the House on June 18, 2013, with a vote of 228 - 196 that largely followed party lines. The purpose of the bill is to ban abortions that would take place 20 or more weeks after fertilization.[18]

Targeted by Club for Growth Action

In February 2013, the Club for Growth Action, a fiscally conservative Super PAC, launched a website called "www.PrimaryMyCongressman.com." According to the Club for Growth Action, "the purpose of the website is to raise awareness of Republicans In Name Only (RINOs) who are currently serving in safe Republican seats....The website will offer Club members and the general public the opportunity to recommend primary opponents to the incumbents highlighted by Club for Growth Action, as well as to recommend primary challengers for any Republican member of Congress. Club for Growth Action will rotate liberal Republicans through the website to highlight their failed records on limiting government." Ellmers was one of the first nine incumbent Republicans to be targeted by the site, which gave her a lifetime Club for Growth rating of 66%.[19][20]

Elections

2014

See also: United States Senate elections in North Carolina, 2014

Although thought to be a potential 2014 Republican candidate for U.S. Senate in North Carolina, Ellmers announced in July 2013 that she would run for re-election to her House seat in 2014.[21][22]

2012

See also: North Carolina's 2nd congressional district elections, 2012

Ellmers ran in the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing North Carolina's 2nd District. Ellmers won the nomination on the Republican ticket. The signature filing deadline for candidates wishing to run was February 29, 2012. Ellmers defeated Richard Speer, Sonya Holmes and Clement Munno in the Republican primary on May 8, 2012.[23]

Ellmers defeated Steve Willkins in the general election on November 6.

In 2011 redistricting, The Hill published a list of the Top Ten House Members who were helped by redistricting.[24] Ellmers ranked 2nd on the list.[24] According to the article, after 2001 redistricting by Democrats attempted to make the district more Democratic-leaning, the 2011 redistricting by Republicans took the district from a slightly Republican-leaning district to one that’s more solidly Republican.[24]

The Washington Post listed the House of Representatives elections in North Carolina in 2012 as one of the states that could have determined whether Democrats retook the House or Republicans held their majority in 2013.[25] North Carolina was rated 8th on the list.[25][26]


"Fighting Barack Obama Everday"
U.S. House, North Carolina District 2 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Steve Wilkins 41.4% 128,973
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRenee Ellmers Incumbent 55.9% 174,066
     Libertarian Brian Irving 2.7% 8,358
Total Votes 311,397
Source: North Carolina State Board of Elections "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"
U.S. House, North Carolina District 2 Republican Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngRenee Ellmers Incumbent 56% 37,661
Sonya Holmes 9.7% 6,535
Clement F. Munno 4.4% 2,982
Richard Speer 29.9% 20,099
Total Votes 67,277

Ads

On May 1, 2012, Ellmers released a 30-second TV ad titled "Fighting Barack Obama Everyday." Among other things, the ad says Ellmers supports "traditional marriage."[27]

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Ellmers is available dating back to 2010. Based on available campaign finance records, Ellmers raised a total of $1,205,245 during that time period. This information was last updated on May 16, 2013.[29]

Renee Ellmers's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 U.S. House (North Carolina, District 2) Won $1,086,869
2010 U.S. House (North Carolina, District 2) Won $118,376
Grand Total Raised $1,205,245

2014

Candidates for Congress are required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Ellmers’ reports.[30]

Renee Ellmers (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[31]April 15, 2013$127,730.53$99,724.09$(93,867.89)$133,586.73
July Quarterly[32]July 15, 2013$133,586.73$158,351.15$(111,482.23)$180,455.65
Running totals
$258,075.24$(205,350.12)


2012

Breakdown of the source of Ellmers's campaign funds before the 2012 election.

Ellmers won election to the U.S. House in 2012. During that election cycle, Ellmers's campaign committee raised a total of $1,086,870 and spent $1,190,907.[33]

Cost per vote

Ellmers spent $6.85 per vote received in 2012.

2010

Breakdown of the source of Ellmers' campaign funds before the 2010 election.
Ellmers was elected to the U.S. House in 2010. Her campaign committee raised a total of $1,118,376 and spent $886,608.[34]

Analysis

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Ellmers is a "rank-and-file Republican" as of June 25, 2013.[35]

Like-minded colleagues

The website OpenCongress tracks the voting records of each member to determine with whom he or she votes most and least often. The results include a member from each party.[36]

Ellmers most often votes with:

Ellmers least often votes with:

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Ellmers missed 31 of 1,714 roll call votes from Jan 2011 to Apr 2013, which is 1.8% of votes during that period. This is better than the median of 2.2% among the lifetime records of representatives currently serving. [37]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Ellmers paid her congressional staff a total of $841,597 in 2011. Overall, North Carolina ranked 7th in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[38]

Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Ellmers' net worth as of 2011 was estimated between $-446,994 to $109,998. That averages to $-168,498, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican House members in 2011 of $7,859,232. Her average net worth decreased by 84.16% from 2010.[39]

2010

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Ellmers' net worth as of 2010 was estimated between $-382,993 to $199,999. That averages to $-91,497, which is lower than the average net worth of Republicans in 2010 of $7,561,133.[40]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

2012

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Ellmers tied with two other members of the U.S. House of Representatives, ranking 43rd in the conservative rankings among members of the U.S. House.[41]

2011

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Ellmers was tied with three other members of the U.S. House of Representatives ranking 15th in the conservative rankings among members of the U.S. House.[42]

Percentage voting with party

June 2013

Renee Ellmers voted with the Republican Party 96.1% of the time, which ranked 29 among the 234 House Republican members as of December 2013.[43]

Personal

Ellmers and her husband Brent moved to North Carolina following the birth of their son Ben and have resided in Harnett County ever since.[44]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Renee + Ellmers + North Carolina + House

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

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External links


References

  1. Politico "2012 Election Map, North Carolina"
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Biographical Directory of the United States Congress "ELLMERS, Renee, (1964 - )"
  3. CQ.com, "House Committee Rosters for the 113th Congress"
  4. Congresswoman Renee Ellmers, Proudly Serving North Carolina's Second District "Committee Assignments"
  5. House Committee on Agriculture, Chairman Frank D. Lucas "Subcommittees"
  6. Committee on Foreign Affairs, Chairman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen "Subcommittees"
  7. House Committee on Small Business, Chairman Sam Graves "Subcommittees"
  8. U.S. House "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff" Accessed January 4, 2013.
  9. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, First Session of the 112th Congress," accessed September 5, 2013
  10. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, Second Session of the 113th Congress," accessed March 4, 2014
  11. Project Vote Smart, "HR 1960 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  12. Project Vote Smart, "HR 2217 - Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2014 - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  13. Project Vote Smart, "HR 624 - Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  14. Project Vote Smart, "HR 273 - Eliminates the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  15. The Library of Congress, "H.AMDT.136," accessed September 16, 2013
  16. Project Vote Smart, "H Amdt 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  17. Project Votesmart, "H Amdt 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  18. Project Vote Smart, "HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  19. Idaho Statesman, "Club for Growth targets Idaho Rep. Simpson for defeat in 2014," February 27, 2013
  20. The New York Times, "Club for Growth Leads Conservative Charge, Sometimes at Republicans," March 13, 2013
  21. Southern Political Report "North Carolina: GOPers Circling Around Hagan" Accessed May 23, 2013
  22. Washington Post, "Renee Ellmers won’t run for Senate," Accessed July 30, 2013
  23. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named nc
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 The Hill "House members most helped by redistricting" Accessed April 17, 2012
  25. 25.0 25.1 Washington Post "The 10 states that will determine control of the House in 2012" Accessed April 25, 2012
  26. North Carolina State Board of Elections "2012 Primary Results"
  27. newsobserver.com "Congresswoman Renee Ellmers walks fine line on marriage stance" Accessed May 2, 2012
  28. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  29. Open Secrets "Renee Ellmers" Accessed May 16, 2013
  30. Federal Election Commission "Renee Ellmers Summary Report," Accessed August 1, 2013
  31. Federal Election Commission "Renee Ellmers April Quarterly," Accessed August 1st, 2013
  32. Federal Election Commission "Renee Ellmers July Quarterly," Accessed July 30, 2013
  33. Open Secrets "Renee Ellmers 2012 Election Cycle," Accessed March 4, 2013
  34. Open Secrets "Renee Ellmers 2010 Election Data," Accessed December 29, 2011
  35. Gov Track "Ellmers" Accessed June 25, 2013
  36. OpenCongress, "Renee Ellmers," Accessed August 6, 2013
  37. GovTrack, "Renee Ellmers" Accessed April 2013
  38. LegiStorm, "Renee Ellmers," Accessed October 1, 2012
  39. OpenSecrets.org "Renee Ellmers (R-NC), 2011," accessed February 21, 2013
  40. OpenSecrets.org, "Renee Ellmers (R-NC), 2010," Accessed October 1, 2012
  41. National Journal, "2012 Congressional Vote Ratings," March 7, 2013
  42. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," February 23, 2012
  43. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  44. Congresswoman Renee Ellmers, Proudly Serving North Carolina's Second District "Congresswoman Ellmers Biography"
Political offices
Preceded by
Bob Etheridge
U.S. House of Representatives - North Carolina District 2
2011–Present
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Chair of Dunn, North Carolina Planning Board
2008-2010
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Member of Dunn, North Carolina Planning Board
2006-2010
Succeeded by
'