Difference between revisions of "Residences of the American governors"

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The first mansion at the original state capitol, Milledgeville, was used from 1838-1868 and is still open for public tours. The second residence, a large Victorian home acquired by the state in 1870, was used until it was demolished in 1923. The next official home was the large granite estate previously of Edwin Ansley which was demolished in 1968.<ref name=ga/>  
 
The first mansion at the original state capitol, Milledgeville, was used from 1838-1868 and is still open for public tours. The second residence, a large Victorian home acquired by the state in 1870, was used until it was demolished in 1923. The next official home was the large granite estate previously of Edwin Ansley which was demolished in 1968.<ref name=ga/>  
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Georgia is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. In Georgia, male inmates with life sentences that have been refused parole at least once can join the work program. These inmates are healthy, under 50, and have had excellent recommendations from the warden and prison staff. They are responsible for cooking, cleaning, and laundry inside the Mansion as well as in the State Patrol barracks. They maintain the grounds including maintenance of yard equipment, planting and maintaining the vegetable garden, maintaining the swimming pool, and cleaning/washing cars.  They are also responsible for holiday decorations and assisting with holiday tours and occasional special events.<ref name=inmate/>
  
 
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Illinois is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Male inmates in low security prisons with no violence in their history can take part in the work program at the residence. They are responsible for cutting grass, planting flowers, and outdoor custodial work.<ref name=inmate/>
  
 
==Indiana==
 
==Indiana==
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Louisiana is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Male inmates who have been pre-screened by Louisiana State Police for specific skills, good health, good behavior and who have passed an oral interview conducted by the Governor's Security Commander are eligible to participate in the residence work program. Inmates work in the kitchen, on the grounds, and as the butlers, as well as perform janitorial duties and laundry services.<ref name=inmate/>
 
 
 
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[[File:MD Governor Mansion 09.JPG|350px|thumb|Maryland's governor's mansion]]
 
[[File:MD Governor Mansion 09.JPG|350px|thumb|Maryland's governor's mansion]]
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Maryland is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Both male and female inmates who are classified as pre-release security inmates are eligible to participate in the residence work program. Inmates work in sanitation, landscaping, and general maintenance.<ref name=inmate/>
  
 
==Massachusetts==
 
==Massachusetts==
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Mississippi is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Male inmates in prison for violent crimes are eligible to participate in the residence work program. Inmates are responsible for grounds keeping, interior maintenance, washing cars, and assisting the cooks.<ref name=inmate/>
  
 
==Missouri==
 
==Missouri==
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|Year = 1871
 
|Year = 1871
 
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Missouri is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Male inmates who have been be approved for work release at Algoa Correctional Center with no history of violence, child abuse, sex offenses or history of escape are eligible for the work program. Offenders must also have good institutional adjustment and have completed an interview process with the ACC administration and the Governor Mansion Director. Inmates are responsible for day to day cleaning, cooking and maintenance of the Governor's Mansion.
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They also assist with special events as needed: cooking, cleaning, setting up and providing meal service and grounds keeping.<ref name=inmate/>
  
 
==Montana==
 
==Montana==
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Nebraska is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Both male and female inmates who have achieved community custody are eligible for the residence work program. Inmates are responsible for housekeeping, assisting in the kitchen and with special events, conducting tours of the mansion, tending to family pets, bartending, and vehicle and grounds maintenance.<ref name=inmate/>
  
 
==Nevada==
 
==Nevada==
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Nevada is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Male inmates in minimum custody for non violent offenses, within one year of probable parole or discharge are eligible for the residence work program. Inmates are responsible for general housekeeping, maintenance, and landscaping.<ref name=inmate/>
  
 
==New Hampshire==
 
==New Hampshire==
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North Carolina is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Both male and female inmates who have gone through a stringent screening process are eligible to participate in the residence work program. The process includes two separate personal interviews, risk assessments by trained psychologist, and medical screening. Twenty-two male inmates are responsible for groundskeeping, assisting in the kitchen, and serving at the Raleigh residence. Two female inmates are assigned to the second and third floors of the main residence that function as housekeepers to the first family. At the second, occasional residence, five male inmates perform outside and inside duties including landscaping, residence upkeep, and stewardship for functions.<ref name=inmate/>
  
 
==North Dakota==
 
==North Dakota==
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Oklahoma is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Female inmates eligible for minimum custody and who are within one year of probable parole or discharge are able to participate in the residence work program. The inmates are responsible for grounds keeping and vehicle cleaning.<ref name=inmate/>
  
 
==Oregon==
 
==Oregon==
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South Dakota is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Female inmates in minimum security facilities are eligible to participate in the residence work program. The inmates are responsible for general kitchen and event duties such as event setup, food preparation, serving, cleanup, and tear down.<ref name=inmate/>
  
 
==Tennessee==
 
==Tennessee==
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Tennessee is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Male inmates charge with non-violent crimes are eligible to participate in the residence work program. The inmates provide maintenance of the grounds, landscaping, and other minor maintenance work.<ref name=inmate/>
  
 
==Texas==
 
==Texas==

Revision as of 12:22, 6 October 2013

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Governors
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Current Governors
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This page is about the formal residences of the Governors of the American states.

44 states provide some official home for the sitting Governor and the First Family.

Additionally, in some states the Governor is required to reside at the official home while in office.

Alabama

See also: Governor of Alabama
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Alabama Yes apx. 8,000 sq ft $142,954 4 1950


Alabama's 8,000 sq. ft. mansion, purchased from the heirs of General Robert Fulwood Ligon in 1950, is the second residence in the state's history. The first residence, the Moses Sabel house, used from 1911-1959, was sold to a private school and then ultimately demolished in 1963. It was located at the corner of South and Perry Streets in Montgomery, Alabama. The legislature allots $142,954 for the Mansion, but grants help cover additional costs for maintenance and repairs. The group "Friends of the Alabama Governor’s Mansion," was established to help raise private funds to restore and preserve the history of the home. They meet interior needs, but not maintenance issues. There is also a state agency called the "Governor’s Mansion Authority" made up of 17 individuals that decide how best to care for the home and its upkeep. This uses a combination of private and general funding. The amount of staff fluctuate with each family, but in 2013 the mansion had four full time employees. [1]

Alabama is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. In Alabama in 2010, inmates on the work release program, which includes community custody inmates who work for free world wages in free world clothing, and minimum custody inmates who work in prison whites for government entities participate in a work program where males are responsible for ground work and painting while females contribute with cooking and cleaning.[2]

Alabama governor's mansion
Inside the governor's mansion
Inside the governor's mansion
The Moses Sabel house, the first Alabama Governor's Mansion

Alaska

See also: Governor of Alaska
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Alaska Yes 12,900 $764,600 Unknown 1912


Alaska's 2 1/2-story 12,900-square-foot mansion was completed in 1912 after the 1910 Congress authorized $40,000 for a residence for the governor to be built and furnished. The mansion is located at 716 Calhoun Street in Juneau, Alaska. The building was designed by John Knox Taylor, and was built under the direction of William N. Collier, an engineer with the Treasury Department. At the time, the treasurer department was responsible for overseeing all public buildings owned by the federal government. When the first governor to reside in the home, Walter Eli Clark and his family, moved in, the first floor included a reception hall, drawing room, library, dining room, office, kitchen, two pantries, and a conservatory. The second floor contained four large bedrooms, a sewing room and three bathrooms. The third floor was designed as servant's quarters and had a large room that was to have served as a territorial museum. The exterior of the building, which looks very similar to the building today, was completed in 1936. It was plaster covered wood, painted white. The first renovation was done in 1967-68 by Arthur Morgan Designers of Seattle. They redesigned the third floor into two guest suites and a bedroom. A second renovation, done in 1983, installed new heating, electrical, plumbing, and security systems, as well as restored the interior design of the first two floors to the original 1912 period and refinished the hardwood floors.[3] The most recent work has been a renovation of an exterior retaining wall, and removal of soil on the property that has been contaminated from lead paint. The project, started the summer of 2013, is expected to cost between $800,000 to $890,000 including the landscaping.[4] The 2013 budget for the operating and loan program expenses of state government allotted $764,600 for the normal operating costs of the governor's house.[5]

Alaska governor's mansion
Lights on Alaska governor's mansion
Northern corner of the mansion in 1991

Arizona

See also: Governor of Arizona

Arizona does not currently have a Governor's residence. A mansion previously used to house the governor is now a historical museum.

Arkansas

See also: Governor of Arkansas
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Arkansas Yes apx. 9,000 sq ft $154500 9 1948


Arkansas governor's mansion
The Arkansas governor's residence was built in 1948. The building includes the historic home, Grand Hall, and a connecting atrium. Altogether the mansion covers 30,000 square feet, with the home itself taking up 9,000 square feet. The official state operating budget allots $309,000 for two years and maintenance costs are supplemented by money raised through rentals of the Grand Hall and catering. The "Governor's Mansion Association" hold fundraising activities to raise money for purchases for the mansion that cannot be bought with tax payer dollars. The organization has raised money for items such as new pieces of crystal, drapes, and furniture reupholstery. The residence hires nine full time employees, and 20 Arkansas State policeman who provide round the clock security for the residing governor, the family, and the residence and grounds.[6]

Each year, the mansion averages about 160 special events such as dinners, luncheons, and receptions. Many events are state and government affairs but hall rental is also available to non-profit charitable groups and some government organizations and associations. No one may rent the hall for personal events such as weddings or birthdays.[6]

Arkansas is one of thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence.[2] They currently have thirteen prison trusties who work on maintenance for the outside grounds and inside custodial duties.[6] Their residence work program is only open to males.[2]

California

See also: Governor of California

California's former official Governor's residence is now a historical site.


Colorado

See also: Governor of Colorado
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Colorado No apx. 26,000 sq ft Unknown 1 full-time 1960


The western exposure of the Boettcher Mansion, residence of the Governor and First Family of Colorado.

Properly known as the Boettcher Mansion, the official gubernatorial residence is an early 20th century white marble home, built in the Roman Ionic style and located at East 8th Avenue and Logan Street on Capitol Hill in Denver.

The mansion passed through the ownership of many of Colorado's founding families, having been built by the Cheesemans between 1907-1908, upgraded by the Evans throughout the early 1920s, and finally coming to be owned by the Boettchers. It was offered to the state of Colorado as a gubernatorial residence in 1957, in accordance with the will of Edna Boettcher, and accepted on behalf of the state by Governor Stephen McNichols in 1959.

Many of the furnishings are original to the era when the mansion was a private residence. Of particular note is the Waterford chandelier in the main drawing room, which originally hung in the White House ballroom and was given to Colorado on the occasion of her statehood, in 1876, by President Chester A. Arthur.

The second floor is the private residence of the First Family of Colorado, if they so choose. The lack of both space and privacy has led to several recent governors maintaining their private homes instead. Governor Hickenlooper and Governor Owens both kept their own homes, through Governor Ritter moved into the mansion.

The main floor of the mansion is used for state occasions, is open to the public for tours, and may be rented for private events.

Connecticut

See also: Governor of Connecticut
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Connecticut Yes apx. 15,000 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1943


When the Governor of Connecticut is working in Hartford, he or she resides in this 15,000 square foot Georgian Revival style home.[7][8] It was built in 1909, designed by the Boston-based architectural firm of Andrews, Jacques & Rantoul. North and South wing additions were added in 1916 by Hartford architects Smith & Bassett. The residence was originally built for Hartford physician and industrialist George C.F. Williams. The State of Connecticut acquired the property in 1943 for $39,500 to the Williams estate in lieu of back taxes.[9] While the home originally sat on 14 acres, it now sits on four and includes a pergola and a pool. The residence is three stories and contains nine fireplaces and nine bathrooms.[7] The most recent residence activity, started in 2011, is a redecorating project by Connecticut Cottages and Gardens magazine. They are donating the labor and supplies to be able to use the residence project as a topic in their publication.[10]

Connecticut governor's mansion
Inside the governor's mansion
Inside the governor's mansion

Delaware

See also: Governor of Delaware
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Delaware yes apx. 3,584 sq ft $70,100 Unknown 1965


The Delaware residence in 1959
The 3,584 sq foot mansion in Delaware has been the gubernatorial residence since 1965. Before its purchase from the government, the mansion was a family home for several generations. The residence, often referred to as Woodburn, was built by Charles Hillyard III in 1798. While it was in use as a family home, it was even thought to be a stop on the underground railroad in the 1840s and 1850s.[11]

The organization, Friends of Woodburn, Inc is responsible for the continuous maintenance, preservation, restoration, and enhancement of the Governor's House.[12] $70,100 was allocated for the mansion in the 2014 budget.[13]

Florida

See also: Governor of Florida
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Florida Yes Unknown Unknown 10 1956


The governor currently resides in the Florida gubernatorial mansion, ten blocks away from the state capitol. The Greek Revival mansion was designed by Palm Beach architect Marion Sums Wyeth, and the grounds include a screened swimming pool, cabana, exercise room, and patio.[14]

This is Florida's second mansion. The first, completed in 1907, was torn down in 1955 because it was structurally unsound. The current mansion was completed the following year, in 1956. Ten staff members are responsible for maintenance of the residence, including implementing all events hosted by the first family and their guests.[15] The Governor's Mansion Commission, established by the legislature, oversees funds required to run the mansion. Only official events, hosted by the governor, lieutenant governor, or spouse of the governor are held at the mansion.[16]

Florida governor's mansion
State reception room inside the governor's mansion

Georgia

See also: Governor of Georgia
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Georgia Yes apx. 24000 sq ft $40,000 Unknown 1967


Georgia's current 24,000 square foot gubernatorial mansion was acquired in 1967 and is the fourth official residence in the state's history. The mansion, like many other mansions in the south, was designed in the Greek Revival style by Georgia architect Thomas Bradbury. The residence, located in northeast Atlanta, has three floors, 30 rooms, and sits on 18 acres. The first floor is designated for official entertaining while the first family resides on the second. The mansion boasts 30 columns on its porches, each standing 24 ft high and made from hollowed out California redwoods. The state acquired the residence from Robert Maddox after a fire had destroyed a large part of the house, and Maddox sold the property to the state.[17] The property is budgeted for $40,000 in operating costs for 2014 and the organization "Friends of the Mansion" solicits and accepts charitable gifts and bequests for the restoration, maintenance, and preservation of the mansion and its furnishings.[18][19]

The first mansion at the original state capitol, Milledgeville, was used from 1838-1868 and is still open for public tours. The second residence, a large Victorian home acquired by the state in 1870, was used until it was demolished in 1923. The next official home was the large granite estate previously of Edwin Ansley which was demolished in 1968.[17]

Georgia is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. In Georgia, male inmates with life sentences that have been refused parole at least once can join the work program. These inmates are healthy, under 50, and have had excellent recommendations from the warden and prison staff. They are responsible for cooking, cleaning, and laundry inside the Mansion as well as in the State Patrol barracks. They maintain the grounds including maintenance of yard equipment, planting and maintaining the vegetable garden, maintaining the swimming pool, and cleaning/washing cars. They are also responsible for holiday decorations and assisting with holiday tours and occasional special events.[2]

Current Georgia governor's mansion
Former mansion
The mansion used from 1870-1923

Hawaii

See also: Governor of Hawaii

The official residence is Washington Place, acquired by Hawaii in 1918. Prior to that, it was the home of Hawaii's last monarch Queen Lili‛uokalan.

Hawaii governor's mansion

Idaho

Idaho
See also: Governor of Idaho
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Idaho No apx. 7370 sq ft $120,739 Unknown 2004


Illinois

Illinois
See also: Governor of Illinois
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Illinois Yes apx. 50,000 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1855


Illinois is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Male inmates in low security prisons with no violence in their history can take part in the work program at the residence. They are responsible for cutting grass, planting flowers, and outdoor custodial work.[2]

Indiana

Indiana
See also: Governor of Indiana
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Indiana Yes apx. 10500 sq ft $114,575 Unknown 1973


Iowa

See also: Governor of Iowa
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Iowa Yes apx. 18,000 sq ft $454,067 4 1972


Iowa governor's mansion

Kansas

Kansas
See also: Governor of Kansas
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Kansas Unknown apx. 6,000 sq ft $115,000 Unknown 1955


Kentucky

See also: Governor of Kentucky
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Kentucky Yes apx. 18,428 sq ft Unknown 12-15 1914


Kentucky's governor's mansion

Louisiana

See also: Governor of Louisiana
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Louisiana Unknown apx. 25,000 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1963


Louisiana is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Male inmates who have been pre-screened by Louisiana State Police for specific skills, good health, good behavior and who have passed an oral interview conducted by the Governor's Security Commander are eligible to participate in the residence work program. Inmates work in the kitchen, on the grounds, and as the butlers, as well as perform janitorial duties and laundry services.[2]

Louisiana's Governor's mansion
Foyer
Library
Library
East Room

Maine

See also: Governor of Maine
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Maine Yes apx. 10,000 sq ft $537181 Unknown 1919


Maine's governor's mansion

Maryland

Maryland
See also: Governor of Maryland
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
{{{State}}} Yes apx.30,800 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1870


Maryland's governor's mansion

Maryland is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Both male and female inmates who are classified as pre-release security inmates are eligible to participate in the residence work program. Inmates work in sanitation, landscaping, and general maintenance.[2]

Massachusetts

Massachusetts
See also: Governor of Massachusetts

There is no official residence for Massachusetts

Michigan

Michigan
See also: Governor of Michigan
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Michigan No apx. 8700 sq ft and 7100 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1969 and 1944


Michigan has two official residences.

Minnesota

Minnesota
See also: Governor of Minnesota
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Minnesota Yes apx. 16000 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1965


Mississippi

Mississippi
See also: Governor of Mississippi
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Mississippi Unknown apx. 11,448 sq ft $547,455 Unknown 1842


Mississippi is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Male inmates in prison for violent crimes are eligible to participate in the residence work program. Inmates are responsible for grounds keeping, interior maintenance, washing cars, and assisting the cooks.[2]

Missouri

Missouri
See also: Governor of Missouri
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Missouri Yes apx. 4422 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1871


Missouri is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Male inmates who have been be approved for work release at Algoa Correctional Center with no history of violence, child abuse, sex offenses or history of escape are eligible for the work program. Offenders must also have good institutional adjustment and have completed an interview process with the ACC administration and the Governor Mansion Director. Inmates are responsible for day to day cleaning, cooking and maintenance of the Governor's Mansion. They also assist with special events as needed: cooking, cleaning, setting up and providing meal service and grounds keeping.[2]

Montana

Montana
See also: Governor of Montana
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Montana apx. sq ft $


Nebraska

Nebraska
See also: Governor of Nebraska
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Nebraska Unknown apx. 15,341 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1957


Nebraska is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Both male and female inmates who have achieved community custody are eligible for the residence work program. Inmates are responsible for housekeeping, assisting in the kitchen and with special events, conducting tours of the mansion, tending to family pets, bartending, and vehicle and grounds maintenance.[2]

Nevada

Nevada
See also: Governor of Nevada
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Nevada Unknown apx. 9,361 sq ft $339,679 2.64 1909


Nevada is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Male inmates in minimum custody for non violent offenses, within one year of probable parole or discharge are eligible for the residence work program. Inmates are responsible for general housekeeping, maintenance, and landscaping.[2]

New Hampshire

New Hampshire
See also: Governor of New Hampshire
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
New Hampshire Unknown apx. 6,724 sq ft $64,731 Unknown 1969


New Jersey

New Jersey
See also: Governor of New Jersey
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
New Jersey No apx. 11,700 sq ft $95000 Unknown 1966


New Mexico

New Mexico
See also: Governor of New Mexico
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
New Mexico Yes apx. 7,949 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1954


New York

New York
See also: Governor of New York
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
New York Yes apx. 20,000 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1877


North Carolina

North Carolina
See also: Governor of North Carolina
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
North Carolina Yes apx. 30,000 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1891


North Carolina is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Both male and female inmates who have gone through a stringent screening process are eligible to participate in the residence work program. The process includes two separate personal interviews, risk assessments by trained psychologist, and medical screening. Twenty-two male inmates are responsible for groundskeeping, assisting in the kitchen, and serving at the Raleigh residence. Two female inmates are assigned to the second and third floors of the main residence that function as housekeepers to the first family. At the second, occasional residence, five male inmates perform outside and inside duties including landscaping, residence upkeep, and stewardship for functions.[2]

North Dakota

North Dakota
See also: Governor of North Dakota
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
North Dakota Yes apx. 10,000 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1960


Ohio

Ohio
See also: Governor of Ohio
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Ohio Yes apx. 16,000 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1954


Oklahoma

Oklahoma
See also: Governor of Oklahoma
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Oklahoma Unknown apx. 14000 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1928


Oklahoma is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Female inmates eligible for minimum custody and who are within one year of probable parole or discharge are able to participate in the residence work program. The inmates are responsible for grounds keeping and vehicle cleaning.[2]

Oregon

Oregon
See also: Governor of Oregon
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Oregon Yes apx. 9840 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1988


Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania
See also: Governor of Pennsylvania
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Pennsylvania Yes apx. 28,500 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1968


Rhode Island

Rhode Island
See also: Governor of Rhode Island

There is no official residence in Rhode Island


South Carolina

South Carolina
See also: Governor of South Carolina
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
South Carolina Yes apx. 16500 sq ft $126000 5 1868


South Dakota

South Dakota
See also: Governor of South Dakota
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
South Dakota Yes apx.14000 sq ft $38,000 2 2005


South Dakota is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Female inmates in minimum security facilities are eligible to participate in the residence work program. The inmates are responsible for general kitchen and event duties such as event setup, food preparation, serving, cleanup, and tear down.[2]

Tennessee

Tennessee
See also: Governor of Tennessee
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Tennessee Yes apx. 15,500 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1949


Tennessee is one of the thirteen states that allows inmates to work on the residence. Male inmates charge with non-violent crimes are eligible to participate in the residence work program. The inmates provide maintenance of the grounds, landscaping, and other minor maintenance work.[2]

Texas

Texas
See also: Governor of Texas
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Texas Unknown apx. 9,900 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1856


Utah

Utah
See also: Governor of Utah
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Utah Unknown Unknown {{{Cost}}} Unknown 1937


Vermont

Vermont
See also: Governor of Vermont

Vermont has no official residence.

Virginia

Virginia
See also: Governor of Virginia
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Virginia Yes Unknown Unknown Unknown 1913


Washington

Washington
See also: Governor of Washington
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Washington Yes apx. 18000 sq ft $200,000 4 1908


West Virginia

West Virginia
See also: Governor of West Virginia
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
West Virginia Unknown apx. 21,000 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1925


Wisconsin

Wisconsin
See also: Governor of Wisconsin
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Wisconsin Yes apx.20777 sq ft Unknown Unknown 1949


Wyoming

Wyoming
See also: Governor of Wyoming
State Currently occupied Square footage Cost to maintain Staff required Year state acquired residence
Wyoming Yes apx. 7875 sq ft $733,031/ 2 years 4 1976


References

  1. Margaret Koenig, "Email communication with Executive Assistant to the First Lady, Heather Hannah," July, 2013
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 ASCA, Governor's Residence Program Survey, September 9, 2010
  3. Statewide Library Electronic Doorway, Alaska Governor's Mansion, December 15, 2010
  4. Newsminer, Renovations planned at Alaska Governor's Mansion, June 6, 2013
  5. Office of Management and Budget, Operating Budget Bill HB0065Z, accessed September 22, 2013
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Margaret Koenig, "Email communication with Mansion Administrator Ron Maxwell" July, 2013
  7. 7.0 7.1 Governor Reil, The Governor's Residence, accessed September 28, 2013
  8. Margaret Koenig, "Email communication with Connecticut State Librarian Stephen Rice" July, 2013
  9. Governor of Connecticut, Governor's residence, accessed September 28, 2013
  10. Connecticut Mirror, Upkeep of governor's residence a dicey issue in tough times, August 1, 2011
  11. Delaware Today, The People's House, October 11, 2010
  12. Guidestar, FRIENDS OF WOODBURN INC, accessed October 4, 2013
  13. Delaware House of Representatives, HOUSE BILL NO. 200, accessed October 4, 2013
  14. The Florida Governor's Mansion, Mansion History, accessed October 6, 2013
  15. The Florida Governor's Mansion, Mansion staff, accessed October 6, 2013
  16. Greg Janetka, "Email communication with Mansion curator Carol Beck," May, 2013
  17. 17.0 17.1 Governor's Mansion, Welcome to the Governor's Mansion, accessed October 6, 2013
  18. Governor's Mansion, Friends of the Mansion, accessed October 6, 2013
  19. The State of Georgia, Act 309, May 6, 2013