PGI logo cropped.png
Congressional Millionaire’s Club
The Personal Gain Index shines a light on how members of Congress benefit during their tenure.





Difference between revisions of "Rhode Island Constitution"

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
m
m
 
Line 1: Line 1:
{{RIConstitution}}The '''Rhode Island Constitution''' is the [[state constitution]] of [[Rhode Island]].  It describes the structure and function of the government of [[Rhode Island]].  The constitution was ratified in November 1842, and become effective in May of 1843.  Prior to this time, the state was governed by the original royal charter granted in 1663.
+
{{RIConstitution}}{{tnr}}The '''Rhode Island Constitution''' is the basic governing document of the state of [[Rhode Island]].   
  
==Articles==
+
==Features==
 +
The Rhode Constitution describes the structure and function of the government of [[Rhode Island]]. It consists of a preamble followed by 15 articles.<ref name="ri"/>
  
The Rhode Island Constitution consists of a preamble followed by 15 articles.
+
==[[Preamble, Rhode Island Constitution|Preamble]]==
  
#   [[Article I, Rhode Island Constitution|Declaration of Certain Constitutional Rights and Principles]]
+
: ''See also: [[Preambles to state constitutions]]''
#   [[Article II, Rhode Island Constitution|Suffrage]]
+
#   [[Article III, Rhode Island Constitution|Of Qualification for Office]]
+
#        [[Article IV, Rhode Island Constitution|Of Elections and Campaign Finance]]
+
#   [[Article V, Rhode Island Constitution|Of the Distribution of Powers]]
+
#   [[Article VI, Rhode Island Constitution|Of the Legislative Power]]
+
#   [[Article VII, Rhode Island Constitution|Of the House of Representatives]]
+
#   [[Article VIII, Rhode Island Constitution|Of the Senate]]
+
#   [[Article IX, Rhode Island Constitution|Of the Executive Power]]
+
#   [[Article X, Rhode Island Constitution|Of the Judicial Power]]
+
#   [[Article XI, Rhode Island Constitution|Of Impeachments]]
+
#   [[Article XII, Rhode Island Constitution|Of Education]]
+
#   [[Article XIII, Rhode Island Constitution|Home Rule for Cities and Towns]]
+
#   [[Article XIV, Rhode Island Constitution|Constitutional Amendments and Revision]]
+
#   [[Article XV, Rhode Island Constitution|General Transition]]
+
  
==Amending the constitution==
+
The preamble to the Rhode Island Constitution states:
  
 +
{| style="width:40%; background:#F2F2F2; margin-top:.1em; border:.5px solid #cccccc; solid;"
 +
|color:#000"|
 +
|-
 +
|
 +
| <center>''We, the people of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, grateful to Almighty God for the civil and religious liberty which He hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him for a blessing upon our endeavors to secure and to transmit the same, unimpaired, to succeeding generations, do ordain and establish this Constitution of government.''<ref name="ri">[http://sos.ri.gov/library/history/constitution/ ''Rhode Island SOS'', "Rhode Island Constitution," accessed March 30, 2014]</ref></center>
 +
|}
 +
 +
==[[Article I, Rhode Island Constitution|Article I: Declaration of Certain Constitutional Rights and Principles]]==
 +
Article I of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled "Declaration of Certain Constitutional Rights and Principles" and consists of 24 sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article II, Rhode Island Constitution|Article II: Suffrage]]==
 +
Article II of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of "Suffrage" and consists of two sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article III, Rhode Island Constitution|Article III: Of Qualification for Office]]==
 +
Article III of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of "Qualification for Office" and consists of eight sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article IV, Rhode Island Constitution|Article IV: Of Elections and Campaign Finance]]==
 +
Article IV of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of "Elections and Campaign Finance" and consists of ten sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article V, Rhode Island Constitution|Article V: Of the Distribution of Powers]]==
 +
Article V of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of the "Distribution of Powers" and consists of only one section.
 +
 +
==[[Article VI, Rhode Island Constitution|Article VI: Of the Legislative Power]]==
 +
Article VI of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of the "Legislative Power" and consists of 22 sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article VII, Rhode Island Constitution|Article VII: Of the House of Representatives]]==
 +
Article VII of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of the "House of Representatives" and consists of two sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article VIII, Rhode Island Constitution|Article VIII: Of the Senate]]==
 +
Article VIII of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of the "Senate" and consists of four sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article IX, Rhode Island Constitution|Article IX: Of the Executive Power]]==
 +
Article IX of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled of the "Executive Power" and consists of 17 sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article X, Rhode Island Constitution|Article X: Of the Judicial Power]]==
 +
Article X of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled of the "Judicial Power" and consists of seven sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article XI, Rhode Island Constitution|Article XI: Of Impeachments]]==
 +
Article XI of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled of "Impeachments" and consists of three sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article XII, Rhode Island Constitution|Of Education]]==
 +
Article XII of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled "Of Education" and consists of four sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article XIII, Rhode Island Constitution|Home Rule for Cities and Towns]]==
 +
Article XIII of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled "Home Rule for Cities and Towns" and consists of eleven sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article XIV, Rhode Island Constitution|Constitutional Amendments and Revision]]==
 +
Article XIV of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled "Constitutional Amendments and Revisions" and consists of two sections.
 +
 +
==[[Article XV, Rhode Island Constitution|General Transition]]==
 +
Article XV of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled "General Transition" and consists of four sections.
 +
 +
==Amending the constitution==
 
:: ''Main article: [[Article XIV, Rhode Island Constitution]]''
 
:: ''Main article: [[Article XIV, Rhode Island Constitution]]''
  
Line 39: Line 79:
  
 
Rhode Island has a unique provision about elections on the constitutional convention question.  It is, "Prior to a vote by the qualified electors on the holding of a convention, the general assembly, or the governor if the general assembly fails to act, shall provide for a bi-partisan preparatory commission to assemble information on constitutional questions for the electors."  This means that before the vote is held, a preparatory commission must be created to do some groundwork for a convention, if the state's voters choose to hold one.
 
Rhode Island has a unique provision about elections on the constitutional convention question.  It is, "Prior to a vote by the qualified electors on the holding of a convention, the general assembly, or the governor if the general assembly fails to act, shall provide for a bi-partisan preparatory commission to assemble information on constitutional questions for the electors."  This means that before the vote is held, a preparatory commission must be created to do some groundwork for a convention, if the state's voters choose to hold one.
 +
 +
==History==
 +
On May 4, 1776, Rhode Island became the first American colony to renounce its allegiance to King George III. Ironically, Rhode Island would be the last state to ratify the [[United States Constitution]] more than 14 years later on May 29, 1790.<ref>[http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/rhode-island-declares-independence ''History.com'', " May 4, 1776: Rhode Island declares independence," accessed March 30, 2014]</ref>
 +
 +
Rhode Island did not adopt a state constitution until November 1842, which become effective in May 1843.  Prior to this time, the state was governed by the original royal charter granted in 1663. Rhode Island functioned as a parliamentary form of government, in which the legislature held all of the power. This remained in force until 2005.<ref>[http://www.questia.com/library/journal/1G1-211068025/rhode-island-s-unique-constitutional-history "Rhode Island's Unique Constitutional History" in the ''Albany Law Review'' Vol. 72, No. 3]</ref>
 +
 +
==See also==
 +
[[File:StateConstitutions Ballotpedia.jpg|right|175px]]
 +
* [[State constitution]]
 +
* [[Constitutional article]]
 +
* [[Constitutional amendment]]
 +
* [[Constitutional revision]]
 +
* [[Constitutional convention]]
 +
* [[Amendment|Amendments]]
 +
** [[Initiated constitutional amendment]]
 +
** [[Legislatively-referred constitutional amendment]]
 +
** [[Publication requirements for proposed state constitutional amendments]]
 +
** [[Rules about constitutional conventions in state constitutions]]
 +
** [[State constitutional articles governing state legislatures]]
  
 
==External links==
 
==External links==
 +
{{submit a link}}
 +
* [http://sos.ri.gov/library/history/constitution/ ''Rhode Island SOS'', "Rhode Island Constitution"]
 +
* [http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~rigenweb/history.html ''Roots Web'', "Rhode Island History"]
 +
 +
==Additional reading==
 +
*[http://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-rhode-island-state-constitution-9780199778713?cc=us&lang=en& Conley, Patrick T., and Robert G. Flanders Jr. (2011) ''The Rhode Island State Constitution'', New York, New York: Oxford University Press]
 +
*[http://books.google.com/books/about/The_Rhode_Island_State_Constitution.html?id=BWUOKXgAk_wC Conley, Patrick T., and Robert G. Flanders Jr. (2007). ''The Rhode Island State Constitution: A Reference Guide'', Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing]
 +
*[http://history.wisc.edu/csac/documentary_resources/ratification/attachments/rhode_island_essay.pdf ''Wisconsin.edu'', "An Introduction to Ratification in Rhode Island"]
 +
 +
==References==
 +
{{reflist}}
  
* [http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/RiConstitution/ConstFull.html Text of the Rhode Island constitution]
 
 
{{Rhode Island Constitution}}
 
{{Rhode Island Constitution}}
 
{{State constitutions}}
 
{{State constitutions}}
 
{{rhode Island}}
 
{{rhode Island}}

Latest revision as of 18:07, 4 April 2014

Rhode Island Constitution
Flag of Rhode Island.png
Articles
PreambleIIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXIXIIXIIIXIVXV
The Rhode Island Constitution is the basic governing document of the state of Rhode Island.

Features

The Rhode Constitution describes the structure and function of the government of Rhode Island. It consists of a preamble followed by 15 articles.[1]

Preamble

See also: Preambles to state constitutions

The preamble to the Rhode Island Constitution states:

We, the people of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, grateful to Almighty God for the civil and religious liberty which He hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him for a blessing upon our endeavors to secure and to transmit the same, unimpaired, to succeeding generations, do ordain and establish this Constitution of government.[1]

Article I: Declaration of Certain Constitutional Rights and Principles

Article I of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled "Declaration of Certain Constitutional Rights and Principles" and consists of 24 sections.

Article II: Suffrage

Article II of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of "Suffrage" and consists of two sections.

Article III: Of Qualification for Office

Article III of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of "Qualification for Office" and consists of eight sections.

Article IV: Of Elections and Campaign Finance

Article IV of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of "Elections and Campaign Finance" and consists of ten sections.

Article V: Of the Distribution of Powers

Article V of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of the "Distribution of Powers" and consists of only one section.

Article VI: Of the Legislative Power

Article VI of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of the "Legislative Power" and consists of 22 sections.

Article VII: Of the House of Representatives

Article VII of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of the "House of Representatives" and consists of two sections.

Article VIII: Of the Senate

Article VIII of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled Of the "Senate" and consists of four sections.

Article IX: Of the Executive Power

Article IX of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled of the "Executive Power" and consists of 17 sections.

Article X: Of the Judicial Power

Article X of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled of the "Judicial Power" and consists of seven sections.

Article XI: Of Impeachments

Article XI of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled of "Impeachments" and consists of three sections.

Of Education

Article XII of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled "Of Education" and consists of four sections.

Home Rule for Cities and Towns

Article XIII of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled "Home Rule for Cities and Towns" and consists of eleven sections.

Constitutional Amendments and Revision

Article XIV of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled "Constitutional Amendments and Revisions" and consists of two sections.

General Transition

Article XV of the Rhode Island Constitution is entitled "General Transition" and consists of four sections.

Amending the constitution

Main article: Article XIV, Rhode Island Constitution

There are two paths by which the Rhode Island Constitution can be changed, the legislatively-referred constitutional amendment and the constitutional convention.

Section 1 of Article 14 explains how the Rhode Island General Assembly can initiate the process of amendment:

  • Amendments may be proposed "by a roll call vote of a majority of the members elected to each house."
  • The proposed amendment "shall be published in such manner as the general assembly shall direct."
  • Votes on amendments take place only at general elections.
  • If a simple majority of voters approve the amendment, it goes into the constitution.

Section 2 of Article 14 is about constitutional conventions:

  • The question, "Shall there be a convention to amend or revise the constitution?," can go on the ballot if approved by a simple majority of the members of both houses of the state's general assembly.
  • If the question hasn't appeared on the ballot at any time in a given ten-year period, the Rhode Island Secretary of State must place it on the ballot as an automatic ballot referral.
  • If the state's voters by a simple majority vote to hold a convention, then a convention shall be held.

Rhode Island has a unique provision about elections on the constitutional convention question. It is, "Prior to a vote by the qualified electors on the holding of a convention, the general assembly, or the governor if the general assembly fails to act, shall provide for a bi-partisan preparatory commission to assemble information on constitutional questions for the electors." This means that before the vote is held, a preparatory commission must be created to do some groundwork for a convention, if the state's voters choose to hold one.

History

On May 4, 1776, Rhode Island became the first American colony to renounce its allegiance to King George III. Ironically, Rhode Island would be the last state to ratify the United States Constitution more than 14 years later on May 29, 1790.[2]

Rhode Island did not adopt a state constitution until November 1842, which become effective in May 1843. Prior to this time, the state was governed by the original royal charter granted in 1663. Rhode Island functioned as a parliamentary form of government, in which the legislature held all of the power. This remained in force until 2005.[3]

See also

StateConstitutions Ballotpedia.jpg

External links

BallotpediaAvatar bigger.png
Suggest a link

Additional reading

References