Richard Holland

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Richard Holland is a $50,000 donor to Nebraskans United. Nebraskans United is sponsoring an effort to keep the Nebraska Civil Rights Initiative off the November ballot through a petition blocking campaign. The organization's website says, ""We are working to prevent our well financed out of state opposition from gathering enough signatures to place this measure on Nebraska’s ballot this fall."[1]

Holland is a reliable donor to Democratic candidates, having given Barack Obama the maximum allowable donation. In 2007-2008, Holland has given $28,000 to the Democratic National Committee, $9,500 to the Nebraska Democratic State Central Committee, $1,000 to Scott Kleeb, $5,000 to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, and $500 to Al Franken.[2][3]

Holland established the Holland Lecture Series at the First Unitarian Church of Omaha with the goal of providing a "forum for the open discussion of sometimes controversial, but always provocative, ideas that might not otherwise be given voice in Nebraska."[4]

Suttle gets support


Anti-Recall Effort Starts

A week before hundreds of recall petitions are scheduled to emerge, Omaha Mayor Jim Suttle got some financial support and at least one well known Republican stepping in to stop the recall.

During a news conference touting the city’s new snow removal plan, the Mayor showed he’s going to let others do the anti-recall talking for him.

When Nebraska Watchdog asked how much of a distraction the recall is Suttle said the question, “Is for another day.”

Meanwhile Omaha philanthropist Dick Holland, a Democrat, is putting together “The Committee to Keep Omaha Moving Forward.”

Republican State Senator Brad Ashford said in October 2010 that he opposes the recall. Ashford argues that state laws be changed instead of throwing the mayor out of office. He wants to change law such as a provision that would allow Omaha voters alone to decide the amount of the city’s sales tax.

Meanwhile, Suttle has rekindled his campaign Website to ask for contributions from those opposed to the recall.[5]

References