Difference between revisions of "Roy Blunt"

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|office2000=U.S House of Representatives (Missouri District 7)
 
|office2000=U.S House of Representatives (Missouri District 7)
 
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===2014===
 
Candidates for Congress are required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Blunt's reports.
 
 
{{Campaign finance reports
 
|Collapse=
 
|Name =Roy Blunt (2014)
 
|Political Party =Republican
 
|Report 1 =April Quarterly<ref>[http://images.nictusa.com/pdf/174/13020194174/13020194174.pdf#navpanes=0 ''Federal Election Commission'', "Friends of Roy Blunt April Quarterly," accessed July 22, 2013]</ref>
 
|Date 1 =4/10/2013
 
|Beginning Balance 1 = 74733.90
 
|Total Contributions 1 =  191752.91
 
|Expenditures 1= 86171.71
 
|Cash on Hand 1 = 180315.10
 
|Report 2 =July Quarterly<ref>[http://images.nictusa.com/pdf/008/13020315008/13020315008.pdf#navpanes=0 ''Federal Election Commission'', "Friends of Roy Blunt July Quarterly," accessed July 22, 2013]</ref>
 
|Date 2 =7/12/2013
 
|Beginning Balance 2 = 180315.10
 
|Total Contributions 2 = 203526.83
 
|Expenditures 2= 82963.67
 
|Cash on Hand 2 =300878.26
 
|Report 3=October Quarterly<ref>[http://images.nictusa.com/pdf/694/13020480694/13020480694.pdf#navpanes=0 ''Federal Election Commission'', "Friends of Roy Blunt October Quarterly," accessed October 30, 2013]</ref>
 
|Date 3=10/11/2013
 
|Beginning Balance 3=300878.26
 
|Total Contributions 3=188022.36
 
|Expenditures 3=63148.81
 
|Cash on Hand 3=425751.81
 
|}}
 
  
 
===2010===
 
===2010===

Revision as of 14:37, 13 November 2013

Roy Blunt
Roy Blunt.jpg
U.S. Senate, Missouri
Incumbent
In office
January 3, 2011-Present
Term ends
January 3, 2017
Years in position 3
PartyRepublican
PredecessorChristopher Bond (R)
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
First electedNovember 2, 2010
Next generalNovember 2016
Campaign $$24,055,207
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
U.S. Representative
1996-2008
Education
Bachelor'sSouthwest Baptist University
Master'sMissouri State University
Personal
BirthdayJanuary 10, 1950
Place of birthNiangua, Missouri
ProfessionCollege Administrator
Net worth$3,093,009
ReligionBaptist
Websites
Office website
Campaign website
Roy Blunt (b. January 10, 1950, in Niangua, Missouri) is a Republican member of the U.S. Senate from Missouri. He was first elected to the Senate in 2010, having won the election by a margin of 13.6%.[1]

Blunt began his political career as a county official in Missouri before being elected to be Secretary of State of Missouri in 1984. He served in the United States House of Representatives from 1996 to 2008.[2]

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Blunt is a more moderate right of center Republican Party vote. As a result, he may break with the Republican Party line more than his fellow members.

Biography

Blunt earned a bachelor of arts degree in history from Southwest Baptist University in 1970. Two years later, he earned a master's degree in history from Missouri State University (then Southwest Missouri State University).[2]

Career

Below is an abbreviated outline of Blunt's academic, professional and political career:[2][3]

Committee assignments

U.S. Senate

2013-2014

Blunt serves on the following Senate committees[4]:

  • Committee on Appropriations
    • Subcommittee on Transportation and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs
    • Subcommittee on Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Department of Defense
    • Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies
  • Committee on Armed Services
    • Subcommittee on Readiness and Management Support
    • Subcommittee on Personnel
    • Subcommittee on Airland
  • Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation
    • Subcommittee on Surface Transportation and Merchant Marine Infrastructure, Safety, and Security
    • Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Insurance
    • Subcommittee on Competitiveness, Innovation, and Export Promotion
    • Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, and the Internet
    • Subcommittee on Aviation Operations, Safety, and Security
  • Committee on Rules and Administration

2011-2012

Blunt served on the following committees:

  • Committee on Appropriations
    • Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies (Ranking Member)
    • Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs
  • Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation
    • Subcommittee on Aviation Operations, Safety, and Security
    • Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, and the Internet
    • Subcommittee on Competitiveness, Innovation, and Export Promotion (Ranking Member)
    • Subcommittee on Surface Transportation and Merchant Marine Infrastructure, Safety, and Security
  • Committee on Rules and Administration
  • Select Committee on Intelligence[5]

Issues

Legislative actions

113th Congress

CongressLogo.png


The 113th Congress has had 55 out of 5,401 introduced bills enacted into law (1 percent) as of November 30, 2013. Comparatively, the 112th Congress had 1.14 percent of introduced bills enacted into law in the first session.[6] For more information pertaining to Blunt's voting record in the 113th Congress, please see the below sections.[7]



National security

Iranian sanctions support

Voted "Yes" Blunt voted in support of S Res 65 - A resolution strongly supporting the full implementation of United States and international sanctions on Iran and urging the President to continue to strengthen enforcement of sanctions legislation. The resolution passed in the Senate by a vote of 99-0 on May 22, 2013.[8]

John Brennan CIA nomination

Voted "No" Blunt voted in opposition of the confirmation of John Brennan as Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. The nomination was confirmed by the Senate by a vote of 63-34 on March 7, 2013. Most Democrats supported the nomination, while Republicans were somewhat divided with roughly one-third supporting the nomination.[9]

Economy

Government shutdown
See also: United States budget debate, 2013

Voted "Yes" During the shutdown in October 2013, the Senate rejected, down party lines, every House-originated bill that stripped the budget of funding for the Affordable Care Act. A deal was reached late on October 16, 2013, just hours before the debt ceiling deadline. The bill to reopen the government, H.R. 2775, lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funds the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by Senate Democrats was to require income verification for Obamacare subsidies.[10] The final vote on H.R. 2775 was 81-18, with all 18 votes against the bill from Republican members. Blunt voted with the Republican Party for the bill.[11]

Student loan interest rates

Voted "Yes" Blunt voted in support of HR 1911 - To amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to establish interest rates for new loans made on or after July 1, 2013. The bill passed in the Senate by a vote of 81-18 on July 24, 2013. The purpose of the bill was to set interest rates for student loans retroactively. Some Democrats split on the bill.[12]

No Budget, No Pay Act of 2013

Voted "Yes" Blunt voted in support of HR 325 - A bill to ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and for other purposes. The bill passed in the Senate by a vote of 64-34 on January 31, 2013. The purpose of the bill was to temporarily suspended the debt ceiling and withhold the pay of members of Congress until a budget could be passed. The vote largely followed party lines with Democrats overwhelmingly supporting it and many Republicans in opposition to the bill.[13]

Immigration

Completion of fence along Mexico border

Voted "Yes" Blunt voted in support of Thune Amdt. No. 1197 - Requires the Completion of the Fence Along the United States-Mexico Border. The amendment failed in the Senate by a vote of 39-54 on June 18, 2013. The purpose of the amendment was to require the completion of 350 miles of fence described in the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 before registered provisional immigrant status may be granted. It would also require 700 miles of fence be completed before the status of registered provisional immigrants may be changed to permanent resident status. The vote followed party lines.[14]

Healthcare

Defund Affordable Care Act

Voted "Yes" Blunt voted in support of Cruz Amdt. No. 30 - To prohibit the use of funds to carry out the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The amendment failed in the Senate by a vote of 45-52 on March 13, 2013. The purpose of the amendment was to block funding for the healthcare program. Voting was split along party lines.[15]

Social issues

Expanded background checks on gun sales

Voted "No" Blunt voted in opposition of Manchin Amdt. No. 715 - To protect Second Amendment rights, ensure that all individuals who should be prohibited from buying a firearm are listed in the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, and provide a responsible and consistent background check process. The amendment failed in the Senate by a vote of 54-46 on April 17, 2013. The purpose of the amendment was to extend background checks for gun sales to gun shows and internet sales. Five democrats voted in opposition of the amendment, while four republicans supported it.[16]

Assault weapon ban

Voted "No" Blunt voted in opposition of Feinstein Amdt. No. 711 - To regulate assault weapons, to ensure that the right to keep and bear arms is not unlimited, and for other purposes. The purpose of the bill was to ban the future sale, manufacturing and possession of assault weapons. The amendment failed in the Senate by a vote of 40-60 on April 17, 2013. One republican voted in support of the amendment while fifteen democrats voted in opposition.[17]

Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013

Voted "No" Blunt voted in opposition of S 47 - A bill to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act of 1994. The bill was passed in the Senate by a vote of 78-22 on February 12, 2013. The purpose of the bill was to combat violence against women, from domestic violence to international trafficking in persons. All 22 dissenting votes were cast by Republicans.[18]

Presidential preference

2012

See also: Endorsements by state officials of presidential candidates in the 2012 election

Roy Blunt endorsed Mitt Romney in the 2012 presidential election. [19]

Political positions

Drones filibuster

See also: Rand Paul filibuster of John Brennan's CIA Nomination in March 2013

On March 6, 2013, Senator Rand Paul (R) led a 13-hour filibuster of President Obama's CIA Director nominee, John Brennan. Paul started the filibuster in order to highlight his concerns about the administration's drone policies. In particular, Paul said he was concerned about whether a drone could be used to kill an American citizen within the United States border, without any due process involved. Paul and other civil liberties activists criticized President Obama for not offering a clear response to the question. A total of 14 senators joined Paul in the filibuster -- 13 Republicans and one Democrat.[20][21][22]

According to the website Breitbart, Blunt was one of 30 Republican senators who did not support the filibuster.[23][24]

The day after the filibuster, Attorney General Eric Holder sent a letter to Paul, responding to the filibuster. Holder wrote, "Does the president have the authority to use a weaponized drone to kill an American not engaged in combat on U.S. soil? The answer to that is no."[25]

Social issues

Blunt has voted pro-life in the House and has a conservative record on most other social issues. He has voted to ban partial-birth abortions and to restrict or criminalize transporting minors across state lines for the purpose of getting an abortion. He opposes federal funding for elective abortions in accordance with the Hyde Amendment.[26] He also voted in favor of the unsuccessful Federal Marriage Amendment, which sought to place a national ban on same-sex marriage, and has voted against gay adoption. He received a 14 percent rating from the American Civil Liberties Union for his civil liberties voting record.[27]

Education

Blunt has voted in favor of school prayer and supported the No Child Left Behind Act. He has voted in favor of school vouchers within the District of Columbia but has voted against broader legislation allowing states to use federal money to issue vouchers for private or religious schools.[28]

Guns

Blunt has voted to prohibit lawsuits against gun manufacturers and dealers if the guns they manufacture or sell are later used in a crime. He has also voted to reduce the waiting period for purchasing a gun from 72 hours to 24 hours.[29]

Environment

Blunt opposes the federal cap and trade legislation and supports drilling for oil on the U.S. coastline.[30]

Business

Blunt supported banking industry-backed efforts to overhaul U.S. bankruptcy laws, requiring consumers who seek bankruptcy protection to repay more of their debts.[31]

Internet gambling

Blunt is a staunch advocate of a federal prohibitions of online poker and H.R. 4777, the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act.[32]

"No New Taxes" Pledge

Prior to the 2011 legislative session, a minority of Missouri lawmakers signed the "No New Taxes Pledge." Only four out of 34 state Senate members signed the pledge. Out of 163 state House members, only 34 lawmakers signed.

From the Missouri delegation heading to the U.S. Congress in 2011, 7 out of 11 lawmakers signed the pledge.

Blunt signed the pledge.[33]

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "Yes" Blunt voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. The bill was passed in the Senate by a 89 - 8 vote on January 1, 2013.[34]

Elections

2010

On November 2, 2010, Blunt was elected to the United States Senate. He defeated Robin Carnahan (D), Jonathan Dine (Libertarian), Jerry Beck (Constitution) and numerous write-in candidates. [35]

United States Senate, Missouri General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRoy Blunt 54.2% 1,054,160
     Democratic Robin Carnahan 40.6% 789,736
     Libertarian Jonathan Dine 3% 58,663
     Constitution Jerry Beck 2.1% 41,309
     Write-in Dale M. Hoinoski 0% 14
     Write-in Frazier Glenn Miller, Jr. 0% 7
     Write-in Jeff Wirick 0% 4
     Write-in Charlie L. Bailey 0% 3
     Write-in Richie L. Wolfe 0% 2
     Write-in Mark S. Memoly 0% 1
Total Votes 1,943,899

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Blunt is available dating back to 2000. Based on available campaign finance records, Blunt raised a total of $24,055,207 during that time period. This information was last updated on April 23, 2013.[43]

Roy Blunt's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2010 U.S. Senate (Missouri) Won $11,932,403
2008 U.S. House of Representatives (Missouri District 7) Won $2,580,060
2006 U.S House of Representatives (Missouri District 7) Won $3,162,484
2004 U.S House of Representatives (Missouri District 7) Won $2,681,746
2002 U.S House of Representatives (Missouri District 7) Won $1,940,045
2000 U.S House of Representatives (Missouri District 7) Won $1,758,469
Grand Total Raised $24,055,207

2010

Breakdown of the source of Blunt's campaign funds before the 2010 election.

Blunt received the highest amount of out-of-state campaign contributions of U.S. House incumbents nationally in the 2010 election. Blunt raised 47.7 percent of his total funds itemized from individuals, or $2.5 million from out of state, research from the Center for Responsive Politics shows.[44][45]

Blunt was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2010. His campaign committee raised a total of $11,932,403 and spent $12,095,571.[46]This is more than the average $8.3 million spent by House winners in 2010.[47]

Cost per vote

Blunt spent $11.47 per vote received in 2010.

Analysis

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Blunt missed 11 of 582 roll call votes from Jan 2011 to Apr 2013, which is 1.9% of votes during that period. This is worse than the median of 1.7% among the lifetime records of senators currently serving.[48]

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Blunt is a "rank-and-file Republican" as of May 2013.[49]

Like-minded colleagues

The website OpenCongress, tracks whom from each party each member of Congress votes most and least often with.[50]

Blunt most often votes with:

McCaskill least often votes with:

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Blunt paid his congressional staff a total of $2,077,615 in 2011. He ranked 13th on the list of the lowest paid Republican senatorial staff salaries, and he ranked 17th overall of the lowest paid senatorial staff salaries in 2011. Overall, Missouri ranked 37th in average salary for senatorial staff. The average U.S. Senate congressional staff was paid $2,529,141.70 in fiscal year 2011.[51]

Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Blunt's net worth as of 2011 was estimated between $575,020 and $5,610,998. That averages to $3,093,009, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican senators in 2011 of $6,358,668. His average net worth decreased by 16.8% from 2010.[52]

2010

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Blunt's net worth as of 2010 was estimated between $1,075,021 and $6,359,998. That averages to $3,717,509.50, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican senators in 2010 of $7,054,258.[53]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

Each year, National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted, as compared to other members, in the previous year. More information about the analysis process can be found on the vote ratings page.

2012

According to the data released in 2013, Blunt was ranked the 40th most conservative senator during 2012.[54]

2011

According to the data released in 2012, Roy Blunt was ranked the 40th most conservative senator during 2011.[55]

Voting with party

May 2013

Roy Blunt voted with the Republican Party 86.8% of the time, which ranked 32th among the 45 Senate Republican members as of May 2013.[56]

Personal

Blunt has been married twice and has four children, one of which he and his second wife adopted from Russia.

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Roy + Blunt + Missouri + Senate

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

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External links


References

  1. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed May 31, 2013
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 U.S. Senate, "Roy Blunt official biography," accessed May 31, 2013
  3. Project Vote Smart, "Senator Roy Blunt's Biography," accessed June 25, 2013
  4. Congressional Quarterly, "Senate Committee List," accessed January 22, 2013
  5. Roy Blunt, United States Senator for Missouri "Committee Assignments"
  6. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, First Session of the 112th Congress," accessed September 5, 2013
  7. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, Second Session of the 113th Congress," accessed March 4, 2014
  8. Washington Post, "S RES 65," May 22, 2013
  9. Washington Post, "Confirmation of John Owen Brennan," March 7, 2013
  10. The Washington Post, "Reid, McConnell propose bipartisan Senate bill to end shutdown, extend borrowing," accessed October 16, 2013
  11. Senate.gov, "H.R. 2775 As Amended," accessed October 31, 2013
  12. Washington Post, "HR 1911," July 24, 2013
  13. Washington Post "HR 325," January 31, 2013
  14. Washington Post, "S 744," June 18, 2013
  15. Washington Post, "HR 933," March 13, 2013
  16. Washington Post, "S 649 Expand background check to gun shows and Internet," April 17, 2013
  17. Washington Post, "S 649 Ban assault weapons," April 17, 2013
  18. Washington Post, "S 47," February 12, 2013
  19. The Hill, "2012 GOP Lawmaker Endorsements for President," accessed November 23, 2011
  20. CNN, "Rand Paul says he's heard from White House after filibuster," March 7, 2013
  21. USA Today, "Rand Paul filibuster ranks among Senate's longest," March 7, 2013
  22. ABC News, "Rand Paul wins applause from GOP and liberals," March 7, 2013
  23. Breitbart, "AWOL: Meet the GOP senators who refused to stand with Rand," March 7, 2013
  24. Politico, "Rand Paul filibuster blasted by Sens. John McCain, Lindsey Graham," March 7, 2013
  25. Washington Post, "Eric Holder responds to Rand Paul with ‘no’," March 7, 2013
  26. Roy Blunt on Abortion, OnTheIssues
  27. Roy Blunt on Civil Rights, OnTheIssues
  28. Roy Blunt on Education, OntheIssues
  29. Roy Blunt on Gun Control, OntheIssues
  30. LCV Names Roy Blunt to 2010 Dirty Dozen List, Launches BigOilBlunt.com, League of Conservation Voters
  31. Roy Blunt on Corporations, OntheIssues
  32. Thomas (Library of Congress): HR 4777
  33. Missouri Watchdog, "Minority of state lawmakers sign ‘no-new-taxes’ pledge," November 16, 2010
  34. U.S. Senate, "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff," accessed January 4, 2013.
  35. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010"
  36. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  37. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  38. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  39. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  40. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  41. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  42. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  43. Open Secrets, "Career Fundraising for Roy Blunt," April 2013
  44. Missouri Watchdog, "Blunt top recipient of out-of-state contributions," November 15, 2010
  45. Open Secrets "In-state Vs. Out-of-state"
  46. Open Secrets, "Roy Blunt 2010 Election Data," accessed October 25, 2011
  47. Open Secrets, "Election 2012: The Big Picture Shows Record Cost of Winning a Seat in Congress," June 19, 2013
  48. GovTrack, "Roy Blunt," accessed April 2013
  49. Gov Track, "Roy Blunt," accessed May 31, 2013
  50. OpenCongress, "Senator Roy Blunt," accessed July 29, 2013
  51. LegiStorm, "Roy Blunt"
  52. OpenSecrets.org, "Roy Blunt (R-Mo), 2011"
  53. OpenSecrets.org, "Blunt, (R-Missouri), 2010"
  54. National Journal, "TABLE: House Liberal Scores by Issue Area," February 26, 2013
  55. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," February 23, 2012
  56. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014


Political offices
Preceded by
Kit Bond
United States Senate - Missouri
2011–Present
Succeeded by
-
Preceded by
Mel Hancock
United States House of Representatives - District 7
1997–2011
Succeeded by
Billy Long
Preceded by
James Kirkpatrick
Missouri Secretary of State
1985–1993
Succeeded by
Judith Moriarty