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Difference between revisions of "San Francisco Board of Supervisors Allowed to Amend or Repeal Voter Initiatives, Proposition E (November 2011)"

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{{tnr}}A '''San Francisco Board of Supervisors Allowed to Amend or Repeal Voter Initiatives, Proposition E''' is on the {{nov08ca2011}} for voters in {{san francisco}}.
 
{{tnr}}A '''San Francisco Board of Supervisors Allowed to Amend or Repeal Voter Initiatives, Proposition E''' is on the {{nov08ca2011}} for voters in {{san francisco}}.
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If Proposition E is approved, after the voters adopt an ordinance:
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* For the first three years after a measure is approved, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors will not be able to amend it.
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* For the next four years, the Board will be able to amend or repeal a measure with a 2/3 vote (8 Supervisors out of 11).
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* After seven years, the measure will be amendable or repealable by a simple majority vote of the Board of Supervisors.
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==Supporters==
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Proposition E was sponsored by San Francisco Supervisor Scott Wiener.<ref name=huff>[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/scott-wiener/a-start-to-reforming-our-_b_904759.html ''Huffington Post'', "A Start to Reforming Our Dysfunctional Ballot Measure System", August 5, 2011]</ref>
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Wiener says that he sponsored Measure I because of the "two...most common questions" he gets as an elected official.  Those two questions are:
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* "Why do you make us vote on so many things?"
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* "Why doesn't the Board of Supervisors do its job and pass legislation without asking us to pass it for you?"<ref name=huff/>
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Wiener says that San Francisco's ballot measure system has "many problems" and that Proposition E only solves one of them.  Yet, he says, "reform starts with one small step."<ref name=huff/>
  
 
==External links==
 
==External links==
  
 
* [http://sfgov2.org/ftp/uploadedfiles/elections/candidates/2011AmendingInitiativeOrdinancesPolicyDeclarations.pdf Text of Proposition E]
 
* [http://sfgov2.org/ftp/uploadedfiles/elections/candidates/2011AmendingInitiativeOrdinancesPolicyDeclarations.pdf Text of Proposition E]
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==References==
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{{reflist}}
  
 
{{california stub}}
 
{{california stub}}
  
 
[[Category:Local election and voting laws, California, 2011]]
 
[[Category:Local election and voting laws, California, 2011]]

Revision as of 07:32, 26 August 2011

A San Francisco Board of Supervisors Allowed to Amend or Repeal Voter Initiatives, Proposition E is on the November 8, 2011 ballot for voters in San Francisco.

If Proposition E is approved, after the voters adopt an ordinance:

  • For the first three years after a measure is approved, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors will not be able to amend it.
  • For the next four years, the Board will be able to amend or repeal a measure with a 2/3 vote (8 Supervisors out of 11).
  • After seven years, the measure will be amendable or repealable by a simple majority vote of the Board of Supervisors.

Supporters

Proposition E was sponsored by San Francisco Supervisor Scott Wiener.[1]

Wiener says that he sponsored Measure I because of the "two...most common questions" he gets as an elected official. Those two questions are:

  • "Why do you make us vote on so many things?"
  • "Why doesn't the Board of Supervisors do its job and pass legislation without asking us to pass it for you?"[1]

Wiener says that San Francisco's ballot measure system has "many problems" and that Proposition E only solves one of them. Yet, he says, "reform starts with one small step."[1]

External links

References


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