Difference between revisions of "San Francisco Repeal of the Notion of Corporate Personhood, Proposition G (November 2012)"

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(External links)
m (Text replace - "{{san francisco}} where" to "{{san francisco}}, where")
(8 intermediate revisions by 3 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
{{tnr}}A '''San Francisco Repeal of the Notion of Corporate Personhood, Proposition G''' ballot question is on the {{nov06ca2012}} for voters in {{san francisco}}.
+
{{tnr}}A '''San Francisco Repeal of the Notion of Corporate Personhood, Proposition G''' ballot question was on the {{nov06ca2012}} for voters in {{san francisco}}, where it was '''approved'''.
  
If the measure is approved, it will set it as a San Francisco policy that corporations are not persons.
+
Proposition G sets as a San Francisco policy that corporations are not persons.
 +
 
 +
==Election results==
 +
 
 +
{{Short outcome
 +
| title = Measure G
 +
| yes = 260,595
 +
| yespct = 80.99
 +
| no = 61,181
 +
| nopct = 19.01
 +
| image =
 +
| unresolved =
 +
| state = Local
 +
| percent = 50.00
 +
}}
 +
:''Final certified results from the [http://sfelections.org/results/20121106/index.php San Francisco County elections office].''
 +
 
 +
==Support==
 +
 
 +
Proposition G was endorsed by the editorial board of the ''[[San Francisco Chronicle]]'', writing, "Normally, declarations of policy such as Prop. G don't have much punch. These measures are nonbinding, amount to only a snapshot of voter mood, and may divert City Hall from more important chores. But on this topic, embodied in the Citizens United decision rendered in 2010, San Francisco should join other cities and states in sending an unmistakable message. Elections shouldn't be tainted by heavy-spending sources leaning on free speech guarantees. Corporations aren't people and should be governed by campaign finance laws."<ref>[http://www.sfgate.com/opinion/editorials/article/S-F-ballot-choices-November-2012-3965570.php ''San Francisco Chronicle'', "S.F. ballot choices, November 2012", October 19, 2012]</ref>
  
 
==Text of measure==
 
==Text of measure==
Line 8: Line 27:
 
   text = '''Proposition G:''' "Motion ordering submitted to the voters a policy declaration that supports limits on political campaign contributions and spending; and opposes artificial corporate rights, and giving corporations the same rights entitled to human beings."
 
   text = '''Proposition G:''' "Motion ordering submitted to the voters a policy declaration that supports limits on political campaign contributions and spending; and opposes artificial corporate rights, and giving corporations the same rights entitled to human beings."
 
}}
 
}}
 +
 +
==See also==
 +
 +
* [[:Category:Local definition of a corporation, California, 2012|Local ballot measures defining a corporation]]
  
 
==External links==
 
==External links==
Line 13: Line 36:
 
* [http://sfgov2.org/ftp/uploadedfiles/elections/candidates/Nov2012/Nov2012_SanFranciscoCleanandSafeNeighbrhoodParks-GOBond.pdf Text of measure]
 
* [http://sfgov2.org/ftp/uploadedfiles/elections/candidates/Nov2012/Nov2012_SanFranciscoCleanandSafeNeighbrhoodParks-GOBond.pdf Text of measure]
 
* [http://votersedge.org/san-francisco/ballot-measures/2012/november/measure-g Proposition G on Voter's Edge]
 
* [http://votersedge.org/san-francisco/ballot-measures/2012/november/measure-g Proposition G on Voter's Edge]
 +
 +
==References==
 +
{{reflist}}
 
{{calbm stub}}
 
{{calbm stub}}
  
[[Category:City governance, California, 2012]]
+
[[Category:Local definition of a corporation, California, 2012]]

Revision as of 06:55, 5 December 2012

A San Francisco Repeal of the Notion of Corporate Personhood, Proposition G ballot question was on the November 6, 2012 ballot for voters in San Francisco, where it was approved.

Proposition G sets as a San Francisco policy that corporations are not persons.

Election results

Measure G
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 260,595 80.99%
No61,18119.01%
Final certified results from the San Francisco County elections office.

Support

Proposition G was endorsed by the editorial board of the San Francisco Chronicle, writing, "Normally, declarations of policy such as Prop. G don't have much punch. These measures are nonbinding, amount to only a snapshot of voter mood, and may divert City Hall from more important chores. But on this topic, embodied in the Citizens United decision rendered in 2010, San Francisco should join other cities and states in sending an unmistakable message. Elections shouldn't be tainted by heavy-spending sources leaning on free speech guarantees. Corporations aren't people and should be governed by campaign finance laws."[1]

Text of measure

The question on the ballot:

Proposition G: "Motion ordering submitted to the voters a policy declaration that supports limits on political campaign contributions and spending; and opposes artificial corporate rights, and giving corporations the same rights entitled to human beings."[2]

See also

External links

BallotpediaAvatar bigger.png
Suggest a link

References

  1. San Francisco Chronicle, "S.F. ballot choices, November 2012", October 19, 2012
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Flag of California.png

This article about a local California ballot measure is a stub. You can help people learn about California's local ballot measures by expanding it.