Difference between revisions of "San Francisco Sit-Lie Ordinance, Proposition L (November 2010)"

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A '''San Francisco Sit-Lie Ordinance''' is on the {{nov02ca2010}} for voters in {{san francisco}}.<ref>[http://www.sfexaminer.com/local/Sit-lie-effort-spurs-ballot-bickering-98582324.html ''San Francisco Examiner'', "Sit-lie effort spurs ballot bickering", July 16, 2010]</ref>
 
A '''San Francisco Sit-Lie Ordinance''' is on the {{nov02ca2010}} for voters in {{san francisco}}.<ref>[http://www.sfexaminer.com/local/Sit-lie-effort-spurs-ballot-bickering-98582324.html ''San Francisco Examiner'', "Sit-lie effort spurs ballot bickering", July 16, 2010]</ref>
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[[Gavin Newsom]] is the measure's main sponsor and cheerleader.  Police Chief George Gascon is also a fan of the measure.<ref name=homeless>[http://www.ktvu.com/news/23663187/detail.html ''KTVU'', "Sit-Lie Ordinance Passes Committee But Expected To Fail", May 24, 2010]</ref>
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The ordinance would restrict sitting or lying on sidewalks citywide from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., and provide access to social services for those who need it.  Police officers must give a warning before they can give a citation and the ordinance cannot be used to restrict the people's rights to free speech and peaceful assembly.<ref>[http://www.sfexaminer.com/opinion/blogs/under-the-dome/newsom-to-unveil-sit-lie-ballot-measure-96378884.html ''San Francisco Examiner'', "Newsom to unveil sit-lie ballot measure", June 15, 2010]</ref>
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Homeless advocates oppose the measure, which they view as an attack on the homeless.<ref name=homeless/>
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Revision as of 09:13, 17 July 2010

A San Francisco Sit-Lie Ordinance is on the November 2, 2010 ballot for voters in San Francisco.[1]

Gavin Newsom is the measure's main sponsor and cheerleader. Police Chief George Gascon is also a fan of the measure.[2]

The ordinance would restrict sitting or lying on sidewalks citywide from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., and provide access to social services for those who need it. Police officers must give a warning before they can give a citation and the ordinance cannot be used to restrict the people's rights to free speech and peaceful assembly.[3]

Homeless advocates oppose the measure, which they view as an attack on the homeless.[2]

References

  1. San Francisco Examiner, "Sit-lie effort spurs ballot bickering", July 16, 2010
  2. 2.0 2.1 KTVU, "Sit-Lie Ordinance Passes Committee But Expected To Fail", May 24, 2010
  3. San Francisco Examiner, "Newsom to unveil sit-lie ballot measure", June 15, 2010

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