Difference between revisions of "Sandy Levin"

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Revision as of 20:21, 31 October 2013

Sandy Levin
Sander Levin.JPG
U.S. House, Michigan, District 9
Incumbent
In office
January 3, 1983-Present
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 31
PartyDemocratic
PredecessorWilliam Brodhead (D)
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
Cost per vote$7.90 in 2012
First electedNovember 2, 1982
Next generalNovember 4, 2014
Campaign $$8,634,680
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
Michigan State Senate
1965-1970
Education
High schoolCentral High School, Detroit, MI
Bachelor'sUniversity of Chicago
Master'sColumbia University
J.D.Harvard University
Personal
BirthdaySeptember 6, 1931
Place of birthDetroit, MI
ProfessionAttorney
Net worth$2,128,403
ReligionJewish
Websites
Office website
Campaign website
Sander M. "Sandy" Levin (b. September 6, 1931, in Detroit, Michigan) is a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives representing Michigan's 9th congressional district. Levin was first elected to the House in 1982.

Levin most recently won re-election to the 9th congressional district seat in 2012. He defeated Don Volaric (R), Jim Fulner (L), Julia Williams (G) and Les Townsend (UST) in the general election on November 6, 2012.

Levin began his political career in the Michigan State Senate, where he served from 1965 to 1970.

Levin is set to run for re-election to the U.S. House in 2014.

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Levin is an average Democratic member of Congress, meaning he will vote with the Democratic Party on the majority of bills.

Biography

Levin was born in 1931 in Detroit, MI. After graduating from the University of Chicago in 1952, Levin went on to earn his M.A. from Columbia University and his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1954 and 1957, respectively. Prior to his political career, Levin worked as an attorney.[1]

Career

Below is an abbreviated outline of Levin's professional and political career:[1]

  • 1965-1970: Michigan State Senate
  • 1977-1981: Assistant Administrator, Agency for International Development
  • 2009-Present: U.S. House of Representatives, Michigan

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2013-2014

Levin serves on the following committees:[2]

Joint Committee on Taxation

2011-2012

Levin served on the following House committees:[3]

Issues

Legislative actions

113th Congress

CongressLogo.png

The 113th Congress has had 55 out of 5,401 introduced bills enacted into law (1 percent) as of November 30, 2013. Comparatively, the 112th Congress had 1.14 percent of introduced bills enacted into law in the first session.[4] For more information pertaining to Levin's voting record in the 113th Congress, please see the below sections.[5]

National security

National Defense Authorization Act

Voted "No" Levin voted against HR 1960 - the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014. The bill passed the House on June 14, 2013, with a vote of 315 - 108. Both parties were somewhat divided on the vote.[6]

Department of Homeland Security Appropriations

Voted "No" Levin voted against HR 2217 - the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2014. The bill passed the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 245 - 182 that was largely along party lines.[7]

Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act

Voted "No" Levin voted against HR 624 - the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act. The bill passed the House on April 18, 2013, with a vote of 288 - 127. The bill would allow federal intelligence agencies to share cybersecurity intelligence and information with private entities and utilities. The bill was largely supported by Republicans but divided the Democratic Party.[8]

Economy

Federal Statutory Pay Adjustment Elimination

Voted "No" Levin voted against HR 273 - Eliminates the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees. The bill passed the House on February 15, 2013, with a vote of 261 - 154. The bill would prevent a 0.5% pay increase for all federal workers from taking effect, saving the federal government $11 billion over 10 years.[9]

Immigration

Morton Memos Enforcement Prohibition

Voted "No" Levin voted against House Amendment 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order. The amendment was adopted by the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 224 - 201. The purpose of the amendment as stated on the official text is to "prohibit the use of funds to finalize, implement, administer, or enforce the Morton Memos." These memos would have granted administrative amnesty to certain illegal aliens residing in the United States.[10] The vote largely followed party lines.[11]

Healthcare

Health Care Reform Rules

Voted "No" Levin voted against House Amendment 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The amendment was adopted by the House on August 2, 2013, with a vote of 227-185. The amendment requires that all changes to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act be approved by Congress before taking effect. The vote was largely along party lines.[12]

Social issues

Abortion

Voted "No" Levin voted against HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act. The resolution passed the House on June 18, 2013, with a vote of 228 - 196 that largely followed party lines. The purpose of the bill is to ban abortions that would take place 20 or more weeks after fertilization.[13]

SNAP challenge
See also: United States Farm Bill 2013

In June 2013, more than two dozen House Democrats, including Levin, took part in a SNAP challenge, feeding themselves for a week on the average benefit level of a SNAP recipient.[14] Participants agreed to eat all meals from a limited food budget comparable to that of a SNAP participant, approximately $1.50 per meal, or $4.50 a day.[15]

Previous congressional sessions

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "Yes" Levin voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was 1 of 172 Democrats that voted in favor of the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257 - 167 vote on January 1, 2013.[16]

IRS targeting

On May 10, 2013, news broke that various branches of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) had specifically targeted conservative groups' applications for tax-exempt status. This began during the tea party surge in 2010. The agency was separating tax-exempt applications by searching for political terms such as "tea party" and "patriot." In June 2011, an IRS official was briefed on these transgressions and asked that this practice end. The flagging continued, however, when the criteria was changed in January 2012 to look out for groups educating on the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.[17]

The targeting included allegations that tea party groups were forced to provide information not asked of other tax exempt groups. Examples of this included requests for donor information, Facebook posts, resumes and political intentions of group officials and connections to other groups.[18][19]

On May 16, IRS Commissioner Steven Miller announced his resignation. He still testified at the hearings the next day.[20]

As a result of this scandal, Republicans and many Democratic members of Congress, including Levin, publicly called for a deeper investigation into these matters. The House Ways and Means Committee held a hearing on May 17 during which it was disclosed that the Obama administration was made aware of the targeting on June 4, 2012.[21]

On May 20, Senators Max Baucus and Orrin Hatch sent a written inquiry regarding the process for how the agency reviewed applications for tax exempt status. The letter also requested any correspondence between White House officials and the IRS mentioning 501(c) organizations.[22]

During the May 22 House committee hearing on the issue, Lois Lerner, head of the IRS tax-exempt organizations office, declined to answer questions citing her Fifth Amendment right.[23] The next day, May 23, Lerner was placed on administrative leave pending an investigation after Senators John McCain and Carl Levin called on IRS officials to place her on suspension.[24] Lerner retired on September 23, 2013.[25]

Campaign themes

2012

  • Energy

Excerpt: "Energy is the lifeblood of our economy. It powers our homes, industries, vehicles, and everything from the iPods in our pockets to the backyard grill. We need a balanced energy plan that plays to our nation’s – and Michigan’s – strengths."[26]

  • Environment

Excerpt: "Michigan is surrounded by the largest system of fresh water on Earth. The Great Lakes hold a full 95 percent of the fresh surface water in the United States. The Lakes literally define Michigan. They are a priceless and irreplaceable natural resource."[27]

  • Economy

Excerpt: "Our state is going through some tough times but we are fighting back. We pulled together and saved the auto industry in the last year. Now we are re-tooling the plants, investing in advanced technologies and preparing to build the cars of the future."[28]

  • Health Care

Excerpt: "Our country took an important step toward affordable health care for all Americans with the passage of the Affordable Care Act. The legislation reforms health care by protecting Americans from the worst insurance industry practices and offering the uninsured and small businesses the opportunity to obtain affordable health care plans, all while reducing the deficit by more than a trillion dollars over the next twenty years."[29]

Elections

2014

See also: Michigan's 9th congressional district elections, 2014

Levin is set to run for re-election to the U.S. House in 2014. If he runs, he will seek the Democratic nomination in the primary election. The general election took place November 4, 2014.

2012

See also: Michigan's 9th congressional district elections, 2012

Levin won the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing Michigan's 9th District. He ran unopposed in the August 7 Democratic primary. He defeated Don Volaric (R), Jim Fulner (L), Julia Williams (G) and Les Townsend (UST) in the general election on November 6, 2012.[30]

U.S. House, Michigan District 9 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSander Levin Incumbent 61.9% 208,846
     Republican Don Volaric 34% 114,760
     Libertarian Jim Fulner 1.8% 6,100
     Green Julia Williams 1.4% 4,708
     UST Les Townsend 0.9% 2,902
Total Votes 337,316
Source: Michigan Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Endorsements

Levin was endorsed by Macomb County's six countywide elected officials.[31]

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Levin is available dating back to 2000. Based on available campaign finance records, Levin raised a total of $8,634,680 during that time period. This information was last updated on May 16, 2013.[47]

Sandy Levin's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 US House (Michigan, District 9) Won $1,836,756
2010 US House (Michigan, District 12) Won $2,345,155
2008 US House (Michigan, District 12) Won $725,438
2006 US House (Michigan, District 12) Won $626,413
2004 US House (Michigan, District 12) Won $980,157
2002 US House (Michigan, District 12) Won $941,800
2000 US House (Michigan, District 12) Won $1,178,961
Grand Total Raised $8,634,680

2014

Candidates for Congress are required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Levin’s reports.[48]

Sandy Levin (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[49]April 14, 2013$238,137.97$115,728.00$(198,387.87)$155,478
July Quarterly[50]July 15, 2013$155,478.10$204,010.00$(123,449.59)$236,038.51
October Quarterly[51]October 14, 2013$236,038.51$283,844.36$(172,816.50)$347,066.37
Running totals
$603,582.36$(494,653.96)

2012

Breakdown of funds according to source.

Levin won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2012. During that election cycle, Levin's campaign committee raised a total of $1,836,756 and spent $1,836,756.[52]

Cost per vote

Levin spent $7.90 per vote received in 2012.

2010

Breakdown of the source of Levin's campaign funds before the 2010 election.

Levin won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010. During that election cycle, Levin's campaign committee raised a total of $2,345,155 and spent $2,392,309.[53]

Analysis

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Levin is a "moderate Democratic leader" as of June 2013.[54]

Like-minded colleagues

The website OpenCongress tracks the voting records of each member to determine with whom he or she votes most and least often. The results include a member from each party.[55]

Levin most often votes with:

Levin least often votes with:

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Levin missed 185 of 18,088 roll call votes from Jan 1983 to Mar 2013, which is 1.0% of votes during that period. This is better than the median of 2.2% among the lifetime records of representatives currently serving.[56]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Levin paid his congressional staff a total of $1,164,571 in 2011. He ranked 22nd on the list of the highest paid Democratic representative staff salaries and ranked 26th overall of the highest paid representative staff salaries in 2011. Overall, Michigan ranked 13th in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[57]

Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Levin's net worth as of 2011 was estimated between $2,103,904 and $2,152,902. This averages to $2,128,403, which is a 0.1526% increase since 2010. This is lower than the $5,107,874 average net worth for Democratic representatives in 2011.[58]

2010

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Levin's net worth as of 2010 was estimated between $1,497,127 and $2,196,122. That averages to $1,846,624.50, which is lower than the average net worth of Democratic representatives in 2010 of $4,465,875.[59]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Click the link above for the full ratings of all members of Congress.

2012

Levin was ranked the 100th most liberal representative during 2012.[60]

2011

Levin was ranked the 126th most liberal representative during 2011.[61]

Voting with party

2013

Levin voted with the Democratic Party 97.6% of the time, which ranked 10th among the 201 House Democratic members as of June 2013.[62]

Personal

Levin lives in Royal Oak, MI. He was married to his late wife, Vicki, for over 50 years and has four children and nine grandchildren.[63]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Sandy + Levin + Michigan + House

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

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External links


References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Biographical Guide to Members of Congress, "Sander Levin," Accessed December 23, 2011
  2. CQ.com, "House Committee Rosters for the 113th Congress"
  3. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "House of Representatives Committee Assignments," Accessed December 23, 2011
  4. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, First Session of the 112th Congress," accessed September 5, 2013
  5. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, Second Session of the 113th Congress," accessed March 4, 2014
  6. Project Vote Smart, "HR 1960 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  7. Project Vote Smart, "HR 2217 - Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2014 - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  8. Project Vote Smart, "HR 624 - Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  9. Project Vote Smart, "HR 273 - Eliminates the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  10. The Library of Congress, "H.AMDT.136," accessed September 16, 2013
  11. Project Vote Smart, "H Amdt 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  12. Project Votesmart, "H Amdt 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  13. Project Vote Smart, "HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  14. U.S. House.gov, "Full Member List of Congressional Snap Challenge," accessed September 25, 2013 (dead link)
  15. Feeding America, "Taking the SNAP Challenge," accessed September 25, 2013
  16. U.S. House, "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff," Accessed January 4, 2013.
  17. USA Today, "IRS knew of Tea Party profiling in 2011, report shows," accessed May 16, 2013
  18. Politico, "The IRS wants YOU- to share everything," accessed May 16, 2013
  19. Washington Post, "IRS officials in Washington were involved in targeting of conservative groups," accessed May 16, 2013
  20. CNN, "'Angry' Obama announces IRS leader's ouster after conservatives targeted," accessed May 16, 2013
  21. The New York Times, "Treasury Knew of I.R.S. Inquiry in 2012, Official Says," accessed May 17, 2013
  22. Politico, "Max Baucus and Orrin Hatch expand IRS probe," May 20,2013
  23. The Washington Post, "Lois Lerner invokes Fifth Amendment in House hearing on IRS targeting," May 22, 2013
  24. CBS, "IRS official Lois Lerner placed on leave," May 23, 2013
  25. Wall Street Journal, "Lois Lerner, at Center of IRS Investigation, Retires," accessed December 16, 2013
  26. Sandy Levin, "Issues," October 8, 2012
  27. Sandy Levin, "Issues," October 8, 2012
  28. Sandy Levin, "Issues," October 8, 2012
  29. Sandy Levin, "Issues," October 8, 2012
  30. Associated Press primary results
  31. Sandy Levin, "Macomb County-wide Officials Endorse Sandy Levin for Reelection in New District," Accessed October 8, 2012
  32. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  33. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  34. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  35. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  36. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  37. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  38. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  39. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  40. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  41. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  42. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1990," accessed March 28, 2013
  43. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1988," accessed March 28, 2013
  44. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 1986," accessed March 28, 2013
  45. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1984," accessed March 28, 2013
  46. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 1982," accessed March 28, 2013
  47. Open Secrets "Career Fundraising for Sandy Levin," Accessed May 16, 2013
  48. Federal Election Commission "Sandy Levin Summary Report," Accessed July 30, 2013
  49. Federal Election Commission "Sandy Levin April Quarterly," Accessed July 30, 2013
  50. Federal Election Commission "Sandy Levin July Quarterly," Accessed July 30, 2013
  51. Federal Election Commission "Sandy Levin October Quarterly," Accessed October 22, 2013
  52. Open Secrets, "2012 Re-Election Cycle," Accessed February 15, 2013
  53. Open Secrets, "Sandy Levin 2010 Election Cycle," Accessed December 23, 2011
  54. GovTrack, "Sandy Levin," Accessed June 7 2013
  55. OpenCongress, "Sandy Levin," Accessed August 6, 2013
  56. GovTrack, "Sandy Levin," Accessed April 2013
  57. LegiStorm, "Sandy Levin"
  58. Open Secrets, "Levin, (D-Michigan), 2011"
  59. Open Secrets, "Levin, (D-Michigan), 2010"
  60. National Journal, "TABLE: House Liberal Scores by Issue Area," February 26, 2013
  61. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," February 23, 2012
  62. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  63. Official House Site, "Biography," Accessed December 24, 2011
Political offices
Preceded by
William Brodhead
U.S. House of Representatives - Michigan
1983-present
Succeeded by
-