Difference between revisions of "Service Employees International Union"

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<div style="float:right">
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{{Short organization profile
{|class="wikitable" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="5" width="205"
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|name = Service Employees International Union
|-
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|image = SEIU logo.jpg
|{{#ev:youtube|KUiejVctDxI|300}}<br><span style="font-size:80%">CNN report on SEIU's lobbying for Obama's health care proposals</span>
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|executive director =  
|}</div>{{TOCnestright}}'''Service Employees International Union''' ('''SEIU''') is a labor union representing 1.9 million workers in about 100 occupations in the United States and Canada. The main divisions are health care (around 50% of the union's membership), including hospital, home care and nursing home workers, public services (government employees), and property services (including janitors and security officers).  
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|president = Mary Kay Henry
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|vice-president =
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|chairman =
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|political party =
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|year = 1921
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|affiliated = [[AFL-CIO]]
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|website = [http://www.seiu.org/ Official website]
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}}{{tnr}}'''Service Employees International Union''' ('''SEIU''') is a labor union representing over 2 million workers in about 100 occupations in the United States and Canada. The main divisions are health care (around 50% of the union's membership), including hospital, home care and nursing home workers, public services (government employees) and property services (including janitors and security officers).  
  
SEIU is based in Washington, D.C., and is structured into seven internal departments: Communications, Education, Human Rights, International Affairs, Organization, Political, and Research.  
+
SEIU is based in Washington, D.C., and is structured into seven internal departments: Communications, Education, Human Rights, International Affairs, Organization, Political and Research.  
 +
 
 +
SEIU states its Vision for a Just Society as: "We believe in and will fight for a just society: Where all workers are valued and all people are respected. Where all families and communities thrive. Where we leave a better and more equal world for generations to come."<ref name=about>[http://www.seiu.org/our-union/ ''SEIU,'' "Our Union," accessed December 13, 2013]</ref>
  
 
==History==
 
==History==
The SEIU was founded in 1921 in Chicago; its first members were janitors, elevator operators, and window washers. Membership increased significantly with a strike in New York City's Garment District in 1934. Formerly known as the Building Service Employees' International Union, it absorbed the International Jewelry Workers Union in 1980 and later the Drug, Hospital, and Health Care Employees Union (Local 1199), Health & Human Services Workers.
+
The SEIU was founded in 1921 in Chicago. Its first members were janitors, elevator operators and window washers. Membership increased significantly with a strike in New York City's Garment District in 1934. Formerly known as the Building Service Employees' International Union, it absorbed the International Jewelry Workers Union in 1980 and later the Drug, Hospital, and Healthcare Employees Union (Local 1199), Health & Human Services Workers.<ref name=history>[http://www.seiu.org/history/ ''SEIU.org,'' "Our History," accessed January 3, 2014]</ref>
  
In 1995, SEIU President John Sweeney was elected president of the [[AFL-CIO]], the labor federation that serves as an umbrella organization for unions.  After Sweeney's departure, former social worker Andrew Stern was elected president of SEIU.  In the first ten years of Stern's administration, the union's membership grew rapidly, making SEIU the largest union in the AFL-CIO by 2000.
+
In 1995, SEIU President John Sweeney was elected president of the [[AFL-CIO]], the labor federation that serves as an umbrella organization for unions.  After Sweeney's departure, former social worker Andrew Stern was elected president of SEIU.  In the first ten years of Stern's administration, the union's membership grew rapidly, making SEIU the largest union in the AFL-CIO by 2000.<ref name=history/>
  
Sources close to the union told ''The Washington Post'' that Andy Stern is going to retire as the union's President on April 12, 2010. This was confirmed via a email the newspaper got a hold of from its Seattle Area President<ref>[http://voices.washingtonpost.com/44/2010/04/stern-set-to-resign-as-head-of.html ''The Washington Post'' "Andrew Stern set to resign as head of major union, SEIU official says", April 12, 2010]</ref>.
+
==Leadership==
 +
Mary Kay Henry is the current President of SEIU.<ref name=about/> Other members of SEIU's leadership include: Mike Fishman (Secretary-Treasurer), Kirk Adams (International Executive Vice President),  
 +
Gerald Hudson (International Executive Vice President), Eileen Kirlin (International Executive Vice President), Valarie Long (Executive Vice President) and Rocio Saenz (International Executive Vice President)
  
==Election involvement==
+
==Elections==
 +
===2014===
 +
Campaign contributions are not yet available for the 2014 election cycle.
  
 +
===2012===
 +
SEIU contributed $18,202,527 in the 2012 election cycle: $1,818,722 to candidates, $100,000 to leadership PACs, $156,672 to parties, $11,516,999 to 527 committees and $3,359,884 to outside spending groups.<ref>[http://www.opensecrets.org/orgs/summary.php?id=D000000077&cycle=2012 ''OpenSecrets'', "Service Employees International Union," accessed December 13, 2013]</ref>
 +
 +
====Candidate contributions====
 +
<div style="float:right">
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{|class="wikitable" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="5" width="205"
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|-
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|{{#ev:youtube|KUiejVctDxI|300}}<br><span style="font-size:80%">CNN report on SEIU's lobbying for Obama's health care proposals</span>
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|}</div>
 +
In the 2012 election cycle, SEIU spent a grand total of $1,818,722 on candidate contributions. All but $250 of that money went to Democrats
 +
<ref name=os>[http://www.opensecrets.org/orgs/recips.php?cycle=2012&id=D000000077 ''OpenSecrets'', "SEIU Recipients, 2012," accessed December 13, 2013]</ref>
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 +
{| class="wikitable" margin-right: 3px; margin-top: 3px; margin-bottom:3px; margin-left:3px; style="background:none; width:600px;"
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! colspan="8" align="center" style="background-color:#008000; color: white;" | Top 10 largest '''SEIU''' candidate contributions in 2012<ref name=os/>
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|-
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! style="background-color:#444; color: white;" | Candidate
 +
! style="background-color:#444; color: white;" | Party
 +
! style="background-color:#444; color: white;" | State
 +
! style="background-color:#444; color: white;" | Office
 +
! style="background-color:#444; color: white;" | Total
 +
! style="background-color:#444; color: white;" | Desired Result
 +
|-
 +
| [[Barack Obama]] ||align="center"|{{bluedot}}||align="center"|N/A||President||$62,366||[[Image:Yes.png|center]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Ron Barber]] ||align="center"|{{bluedot}}||align="center"|AZ||House||$30,250||[[Image:Yes.png|center]]
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|-
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| [[Suzanne Bonamici]] ||align="center"|{{bluedot}}||align="center"|OR||House||$20,500||[[Image:Yes.png|center]]
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|-
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| [[Christopher Donovan]] ||align="center"|{{bluedot}}||align="center"|CT||House||$19,219||[[Image:No.png|center]]
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|-
 +
| [[Chris Murphy]] ||align="center"|{{bluedot}}||align="center"|CT||House||$15,750||[[Image:Yes.png|center]]
 +
|-
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| [[Heidi Heitkamp]] ||align="center"|{{bluedot}}||align="center"|ND||Senate||$15,000||[[Image:Yes.png|center]]
 +
|-
 +
| [[Tammy Baldwin]] ||align="center"|{{bluedot}}||align="center"|WI||House||$14,250||[[Image:Yes.png|center]]
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|-
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| [[Janice Hahn]] ||align="center"|{{bluedot}}||align="center"|CA||House||$12,500||[[Image:Yes.png|center]]
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|-
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| [[Charles Rangel]] ||align="center"|{{bluedot}}||align="center"|NY||House||$12,500||[[Image:Yes.png|center]]
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|-
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| [[Hakeem Jeffries]] ||align="center"|{{bluedot}}||align="center"|NY||House||$12,250||[[Image:Yes.png|center]]
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|}
 
===Coakley/Brown campaign===
 
===Coakley/Brown campaign===
  
 
:: ''[[U.S. Senate special election, Massachusetts, 2010]]''
 
:: ''[[U.S. Senate special election, Massachusetts, 2010]]''
  
In the last week of the January 2010 contest between [[Scott P. Brown]] and [[Martha Coakley]] in Massachusetts to fill the seat in the [[United States Senate]] made vacant by the death of Ted Kennedy, At around the same time, SEIU took out a television ad buy worth "$685,000, one of the largest of the election" on behalf of Coakley.<ref>[http://www.boston.com/news/local/breaking_news/2010/01/union_plans_maj.html ''Boston Globe'' "Union plans major ad buy for Coakley" 12 Jan. 2010]</ref>
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In the last week of the January 2010 contest between [[Scott P. Brown]] and [[Martha Coakley]] in Massachusetts to fill the seat in the [[United States Senate]] made vacant by the death of Ted Kennedy, SEIU took out a television ad buy worth "$685,000, one of the "largest of the election" on behalf of Coakley.<ref>[http://www.boston.com/news/local/breaking_news/2010/01/union_plans_maj.html ''Boston Globe'', "Union plans major ad buy for Coakley" 12 Jan. 2010]</ref>
  
 
===Jeff Denham recall===
 
===Jeff Denham recall===
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:: ''See also: [[Jeff Denham recall (2008)]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[Jeff Denham recall (2008)]]''
  
The SEIU spent $450,000 in 2008 in a vain attempt to recall [[California State Senator]] [[Jeff Denham]], a Republican they sought to punish because he did not vote for their preferred version of the California state budget that year.<ref>Hank Shaw's blog, [http://forums.recordnet.com/n/blogs/blog.aspx?webtag=sr-hshaw&entry=604 ''Denham Recall: Labor adds another $450k''], April 30, 2008</ref>
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The SEIU spent $450,000 in 2008 in a vain attempt to recall [[California State Senator]] [[Jeff Denham]], a Republican they sought to punish because he did not vote for their preferred version of the California state budget that year.
  
 
===Petition blocking lawsuit===
 
===Petition blocking lawsuit===
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:: ''See also: [[Petition blocking]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[Petition blocking]]''
  
On October 30, 2007, [[Ralph Nader]] named SEIU as a co-defendant in [[Ralph Nader v. Democratic National Committee|Nader v. DNC]].  In the ultimately unsuccessful lawsuit, 2004 [[Reform Party]] presidential candidate [[Ralph Nader]] accused the [[Democratic National Committee]] of "groundless and abusive litigation" to bankrupt Ralph Nader's campaign and force him off the ballot in 18 states.<ref>[http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/politics/5259684.html "Nader sues, claims Democrats sabotaged his 2004 campaign", October 31, 2007]</ref>
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On October 30, 2007, [[Ralph Nader]] named SEIU as a co-defendant in [[Ralph Nader v. Democratic National Committee|Nader v. DNC]].  In the ultimately unsuccessful lawsuit, 2004 [[Reform Party]] presidential candidate [[Ralph Nader]] accused the [[Democratic National Committee]] of "groundless and abusive litigation" to bankrupt Ralph Nader's campaign and force him off the ballot in 18 states.<ref>[http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/politics/5259684.html "Nader sues, claims Democrats sabotaged his 2004 campaign," October 31, 2007]</ref>
  
 
===California legislature===
 
===California legislature===
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:: ''See also: [[California State Council of Service Employees]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[California State Council of Service Employees]]''
  
The [[California State Assembly]] has 80 members.  50 of the 80 members were Democrats (as of March 2010).  The [[California State Council of Service Employees]], an SEIU affiliate, was one of the top 5 donors of over 40 of the 50 Democrats in the assembly elections of 2008, in most cases giving the maximum legally-allowable donation of $14,400.
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The [[California State Council of Service Employees]], an SEIU affiliate, was one of the top 5 donors of over 40 of the 50 Democratic members of the [[California State Assembly]] in the elections of 2008, in most cases giving the maximum legally-allowable donation of $14,400.
  
 
==Ballot measure activism==
 
==Ballot measure activism==
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|-
 
|-
| [[California Proposition 1A (May 2009)|Proposition 1A (California)]]
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| [[California Proposition 1A, Temporary Tax Increase (May 2009)|Proposition 1A (California)]]
 
| $16 billion tax increase, spending caps
 
| $16 billion tax increase, spending caps
 
| {{d}}
 
| {{d}}
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|-
 
|-
| [[California Proposition 98 (2008)|Proposition 98 (California)]]
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| [[California Proposition 98, Eminent Domain and Rent Control (June 2008)|Proposition 98 (California)]]
 
| Protect homes from government seizure
 
| Protect homes from government seizure
 
| {{d}}
 
| {{d}}
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|-
 
|-
 
| [[Missouri Proposition B, Home Care Initiative (2008)|Proposition B (Missouri)]]
 
| [[Missouri Proposition B, Home Care Initiative (2008)|Proposition B (Missouri)]]
| Health care unions for home workers
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| Healthcare unions for home workers
 
| {{ap}}
 
| {{ap}}
 
| $936,000
 
| $936,000
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|-
 
|-
| [[Washington Initiative 1029 (2008)|Initiative 1029 (Washington)]]
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| [[Washington Long-Term Care Initiative, Initiative 1029 (2008)|Initiative 1029 (Washington)]]
 
| Training for health care workers
 
| Training for health care workers
 
| {{ap}}  
 
| {{ap}}  
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|-
 
|-
| [[Washington Taxpayer Protection Initiative (2007)|Initiative 960 (Washington)]]
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| [[Washington Rules for Approving Tax Increases, Initiative 960 (2007)|Initiative 960 (Washington)]]
 
| Limits on taxes
 
| Limits on taxes
 
| {{d}}
 
| {{d}}
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|-
 
|-
| [[Arizona Proposition 202, Minimum Wage Initiative (2006)|Proposition 202 (Arizona)]]  
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| [[Arizona Minimum Wage, Proposition 202 (2006)|Proposition 202 (Arizona)]]  
 
| [[Minimum wage initiatives|Minimum wage increase]]  
 
| [[Minimum wage initiatives|Minimum wage increase]]  
 
| {{ap}}  
 
| {{ap}}  
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|-
 
|-
| [[Missouri Minimum Wage Initiative (2006)|Proposition B (Missouri)]]
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| [[Missouri Minimum Wage Act, Proposition B (2006)|Proposition B (Missouri)]]
 
| Minimum wage increase
 
| Minimum wage increase
 
| {{ap}}  
 
| {{ap}}  
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|-
 
|-
| [[Arizona Proposition 200 (2004)|Prop 200 (Arizona)]]
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| [[Arizona Taxpayer and Citizen Protection, Proposition 200 (2004)|Prop 200 (Arizona)]]
 
| Proof of citizenship for voting/benefits
 
| Proof of citizenship for voting/benefits
 
| {{d}}
 
| {{d}}
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|-
 
|-
 
| [[California Proposition 72 (2004)|Prop 72 (California)]]
 
| [[California Proposition 72 (2004)|Prop 72 (California)]]
| Health care
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| Healthcare
 
| {{ap}}
 
| {{ap}}
 
| $4 million
 
| $4 million
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! style="background-color:#00008B; color: white;" | Result
 
! style="background-color:#00008B; color: white;" | Result
 
|-
 
|-
| [[California Proposition 223 (1998)|Proposition 223 (California)]]  
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| [[California Proposition 223, Performance Budgeting Requirements for School Districts (1998)|Proposition 223 (California)]]  
 
| Limit on how much a school district can spend on administrative costs
 
| Limit on how much a school district can spend on administrative costs
 
| {{d}}
 
| {{d}}
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| {{d}}
 
| {{d}}
 
|}
 
|}
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==Recent news==
 +
This section displays the most recent stories in a google news search for the term "'''Service + Employees + International + Union'''"
 +
:''All stories may not be relevant to this organization due to the nature of the search engine.''
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{{RSS|feed=http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&gl=us&q=SEIU&um=1&ie=UTF-8&output=rss|template=slpfeed|max=10|title=SEIU News Feed}}
  
 
==External links==
 
==External links==
 
{{wikipedia}}
 
{{wikipedia}}
 
*[http://www.seiu.org/ SEIU International]
 
*[http://www.seiu.org/ SEIU International]
*[http://www.seiu.ca/ SEIU International (Canada)]
 
 
*[http://www.facebook.com/SEIU SEIU on Facebook]
 
*[http://www.facebook.com/SEIU SEIU on Facebook]
 
*[http://twitter.com/seiu SEIU on Twitter]
 
*[http://twitter.com/seiu SEIU on Twitter]
 +
*[https://www.youtube.com/user/SEIU YouTube channel]
 
*[http://www.nursealliance.org/ Nurse Alliance]
 
*[http://www.nursealliance.org/ Nurse Alliance]
*[http://www.ValueCareValueNurses.org/ Value Care, Value Nurses campaign]
 
 
*[http://www.changetowin.org/ Change to Win Federation]
 
*[http://www.changetowin.org/ Change to Win Federation]
*[http://www.reuther.wayne.edu/use/seiu.html SEIU Collections at Walter P. Reuther Library]
 
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
  
<hr>
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{{congress}}
<small>Parts of the original version of this article were taken from [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Service_Employees_International_Union Wikipedia's article on the Service Employees International Union], under the GFDL license, when Wikipedia still used the GFDL license.</small>
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[[Category:National political organizations]]
 
[[Category:National political organizations]]
 
[[Category:Labor and unions]]
 
[[Category:Labor and unions]]
[[Category:Blocking lawsuits]]
 
 
[[Category:Ballot measure donors]]
 
[[Category:Ballot measure donors]]
[[Category:Ballot measure donors: California]]
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[[Category:Political donors, California]]

Revision as of 06:28, 2 May 2014



Service Employees International Union
SEIU logo.jpg
President:Mary Kay Henry
Year created:1921
Affiliated with:AFL-CIO
Website:Official website
Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is a labor union representing over 2 million workers in about 100 occupations in the United States and Canada. The main divisions are health care (around 50% of the union's membership), including hospital, home care and nursing home workers, public services (government employees) and property services (including janitors and security officers).

SEIU is based in Washington, D.C., and is structured into seven internal departments: Communications, Education, Human Rights, International Affairs, Organization, Political and Research.

SEIU states its Vision for a Just Society as: "We believe in and will fight for a just society: Where all workers are valued and all people are respected. Where all families and communities thrive. Where we leave a better and more equal world for generations to come."[1]

History

The SEIU was founded in 1921 in Chicago. Its first members were janitors, elevator operators and window washers. Membership increased significantly with a strike in New York City's Garment District in 1934. Formerly known as the Building Service Employees' International Union, it absorbed the International Jewelry Workers Union in 1980 and later the Drug, Hospital, and Healthcare Employees Union (Local 1199), Health & Human Services Workers.[2]

In 1995, SEIU President John Sweeney was elected president of the AFL-CIO, the labor federation that serves as an umbrella organization for unions. After Sweeney's departure, former social worker Andrew Stern was elected president of SEIU. In the first ten years of Stern's administration, the union's membership grew rapidly, making SEIU the largest union in the AFL-CIO by 2000.[2]

Leadership

Mary Kay Henry is the current President of SEIU.[1] Other members of SEIU's leadership include: Mike Fishman (Secretary-Treasurer), Kirk Adams (International Executive Vice President), Gerald Hudson (International Executive Vice President), Eileen Kirlin (International Executive Vice President), Valarie Long (Executive Vice President) and Rocio Saenz (International Executive Vice President)

Elections

2014

Campaign contributions are not yet available for the 2014 election cycle.

2012

SEIU contributed $18,202,527 in the 2012 election cycle: $1,818,722 to candidates, $100,000 to leadership PACs, $156,672 to parties, $11,516,999 to 527 committees and $3,359,884 to outside spending groups.[3]

Candidate contributions


CNN report on SEIU's lobbying for Obama's health care proposals

In the 2012 election cycle, SEIU spent a grand total of $1,818,722 on candidate contributions. All but $250 of that money went to Democrats [4]

Top 10 largest SEIU candidate contributions in 2012[4]
Candidate Party State Office Total Desired Result
Barack Obama Democratic Party N/A President $62,366
Yes.png
Ron Barber Democratic Party AZ House $30,250
Yes.png
Suzanne Bonamici Democratic Party OR House $20,500
Yes.png
Christopher Donovan Democratic Party CT House $19,219
No.png
Chris Murphy Democratic Party CT House $15,750
Yes.png
Heidi Heitkamp Democratic Party ND Senate $15,000
Yes.png
Tammy Baldwin Democratic Party WI House $14,250
Yes.png
Janice Hahn Democratic Party CA House $12,500
Yes.png
Charles Rangel Democratic Party NY House $12,500
Yes.png
Hakeem Jeffries Democratic Party NY House $12,250
Yes.png

Coakley/Brown campaign

U.S. Senate special election, Massachusetts, 2010

In the last week of the January 2010 contest between Scott P. Brown and Martha Coakley in Massachusetts to fill the seat in the United States Senate made vacant by the death of Ted Kennedy, SEIU took out a television ad buy worth "$685,000, one of the "largest of the election" on behalf of Coakley.[5]

Jeff Denham recall

See also: Jeff Denham recall (2008)

The SEIU spent $450,000 in 2008 in a vain attempt to recall California State Senator Jeff Denham, a Republican they sought to punish because he did not vote for their preferred version of the California state budget that year.

Petition blocking lawsuit

See also: Petition blocking

On October 30, 2007, Ralph Nader named SEIU as a co-defendant in Nader v. DNC. In the ultimately unsuccessful lawsuit, 2004 Reform Party presidential candidate Ralph Nader accused the Democratic National Committee of "groundless and abusive litigation" to bankrupt Ralph Nader's campaign and force him off the ballot in 18 states.[6]

California legislature

See also: California State Council of Service Employees

The California State Council of Service Employees, an SEIU affiliate, was one of the top 5 donors of over 40 of the 50 Democratic members of the California State Assembly in the elections of 2008, in most cases giving the maximum legally-allowable donation of $14,400.

Ballot measure activism

SEIU affiliates are significant donors to political committees that both oppose and support ballot measures in states throughout the country.

2010

Measure Subject SEIU position SEIU donations Result
Congressional Redistricting (Florida) Approveda $225,000
Legislative Redistricting (Florida) Approveda $225,000

2009

Measure Subject SEIU position SEIU donations Result
Proposition 1A (California) $16 billion tax increase, spending caps Defeatedd $1.3 million Defeatedd
Question 4 (Maine) Tax relief proposal Defeatedd $100,000 Defeatedd
Initiative 1033 (Washington) Property tax limits Defeatedd $297,500 Defeatedd

2008

See also: 2008 ballot measures
Measure Subject SEIU position SEIU donations Result
Proposition 98 (California) Protect homes from government seizure Defeatedd $900,000 Defeatedd
Proposition 93 (California) Softening of Term limits Approveda $100,000 Defeatedd
Amendment 47 (Colorado) Right to work Defeatedd $2.45 million Defeatedd
Proposition B (Missouri) Healthcare unions for home workers Approveda $936,000 Approveda
Measures 58, 58 (Oregon) English immersion, state income tax deductions Defeatedd $1.2 million Defeatedd
Initiative 1029 (Washington) Training for health care workers Approveda $955,000 Approveda

2007

See also: 2007 ballot measures
Measure Subject SEIU position SEIU donations Result
Measure 50 (Oregon) Cigarette tax hike Approveda $142,460 Defeatedd
Initiative 960 (Washington) Limits on taxes Defeatedd Approveda

2006

See also: 2006 ballot measures
Measure Subject SEIU position SEIU donations Result
Proposition 202 (Arizona) Minimum wage increase Approveda $615,976 Approveda
Proposition 82 (California) Free half-day of pre-school for 4-year-olds Approveda $1.5 million Defeatedd
Amendment 42 (Colorado) Minimum wage increase Approveda $21,375 Approveda
Amendment 43 (Colorado) Definition of marriage Defeatedd $150,000 Approveda
Proposition B (Missouri) Minimum wage increase Approveda $210,000 Approveda
Measures 41 and 48 (Oregon) Income tax deductions, spending cap Defeatedd $516,632 Defeatedd
Measure 45 (Oregon) Term limits Defeatedd $120,167 Defeatedd
Measure 46 (Oregon) Campaign finance Defeatedd $145,167 Approveda

2005

See also: 2005 ballot measures
Measure Subject SEIU position SEIU donations Result
State Spending Act, Referendum C (Colorado) Temporary suspension of the Taxpayer Bill of Rights Approveda $130,000 Approveda

2004

See also: 2004 ballot measures
Measure Subject SEIU position SEIU donations Result
Prop 200 (Arizona) Proof of citizenship for voting/benefits Defeatedd $660,000 Approveda
Prop 56 (California) Reduce vote threshold needed for state legislature to raise taxes Approveda $9 million Defeatedd
Prop 72 (California) Healthcare Approveda $4 million Defeatedd
Amendment 5 (Florida) Minimum wage increase Approveda $125,000 Approveda
Measure 36 (Oregon) No same-sex marriage Defeatedd $10,962 Approveda

2002

See also: 2002 ballot measures
Measure Subject SEIU position SEIU donations Result
Proposition 42 (California) Funding for transportation Approveda $950,000 Approveda

2000

See also: 2000 ballot measures
Measure Subject SEIU position SEIU donations Result
Proposition 38 (California) School vouchers Defeatedd $200,000 Defeatedd

1998

See also: 1998 ballot measures
Measure Subject SEIU position SEIU donations Result
Proposition 223 (California) Limit on how much a school district can spend on administrative costs Defeatedd $100,880 Defeatedd

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a google news search for the term "Service + Employees + International + Union"

All stories may not be relevant to this organization due to the nature of the search engine.

SEIU News Feed

  • Loading...

External links

References