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Difference between revisions of "South Carolina's 1st Congressional District"

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{{congress district infobox
 
{{congress district infobox
|District=South Carolina's 1st congressional district
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|District=South Carolina's 1st Congressional District
 
|Incumbent=[[Mark Sanford]] {{reddot}}
 
|Incumbent=[[Mark Sanford]] {{reddot}}
 
|Picture=SC 1st District Map.PNG
 
|Picture=SC 1st District Map.PNG
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The district previously included North Charleston, and parts of Dorchester, Berkeley, and Georgetown counties. It also included Myrtle Beach.  
 
The district previously included North Charleston, and parts of Dorchester, Berkeley, and Georgetown counties. It also included Myrtle Beach.  
  
The current representative of the 1st congressional district is [[Mark Sanford]] (R). A special election was held on [[South Carolina's 1st congressional district special election, 2013|May 7, 2013]]. The seat became vacant after [[Tim Scott]] was appointed to the [[United States Senate]].
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The current representative of the 1st Congressional District is [[Mark Sanford]] (R). A special election was held on [[South Carolina's 1st Congressional District special election, 2013|May 7, 2013]]. The seat became vacant after [[Tim Scott]] was appointed to the [[United States Senate]].
  
 
==Elections==
 
==Elections==
 
===2014===
 
===2014===
::''See also: [[South Carolina's 1st congressional district elections, 2014]]''
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::''See also: [[South Carolina's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014]]''
  
The 1st congressional district of South Carolina will hold an election for the [[U.S. House elections, 2014|U.S. House of Representatives]] on November 4, 2014.
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The 1st Congressional District of South Carolina will hold an election for the [[U.S. House elections, 2014|U.S. House of Representatives]] on November 4, 2014.
  
 
===2013===
 
===2013===
::''See also: [[South Carolina's 1st congressional district special election, 2013]]
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::''See also: [[South Carolina's 1st Congressional District special election, 2013]]
  
The 1st congressional district of South Carolina held a [[Special elections to the 113th United States Congress (2013-2014)|special election]] for the [[U.S. House of Representatives]] on May 7, 2013. The election filled the vacancy left by the appointment of Representative [[Tim Scott]] (R) to the [[United States Senate]].
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The 1st Congressional District of South Carolina held a [[Special elections to the 113th United States Congress (2013-2014)|special election]] for the [[U.S. House of Representatives]] on May 7, 2013. The election filled the vacancy left by the appointment of Representative [[Tim Scott]] (R) to the [[United States Senate]].
  
 
[[Mark Sanford]] (R) defeated [[Elizabeth Colbert-Busch]] in the race.
 
[[Mark Sanford]] (R) defeated [[Elizabeth Colbert-Busch]] in the race.
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===2012===
 
===2012===
::''See also: [[South Carolina's 1st congressional district elections, 2012]]''
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::''See also: [[South Carolina's 1st Congressional District elections, 2012]]''
  
The 1st congressional district of South Carolina held an election for the [[U.S. House elections, 2012|U.S. House of Representatives]] on November 6, 2012. Incumbent [[Timothy Scott]] won re-election in the district.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/2012-election/results/house/south-carolina/ ''Politico'' "2012 Election Map, South Carolina"]</ref>
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The 1st Congressional District of South Carolina held an election for the [[U.S. House elections, 2012|U.S. House of Representatives]] on November 6, 2012. Incumbent [[Timothy Scott]] won re-election in the district.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/2012-election/results/house/south-carolina/ ''Politico'' "2012 Election Map, South Carolina"]</ref>
 
{{Template:Scdis1genelecbox12}}
 
{{Template:Scdis1genelecbox12}}
  
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==Redistricting==
 
==Redistricting==
 
===2010-2011===
 
===2010-2011===
[[File:SC Congressional District 1 2000-2010.jpg|thumb|300px|This is the 1st congressional district prior to the [[Redistricting in South Carolina|2010 redistricting]].]]
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[[File:SC Congressional District 1 2000-2010.jpg|thumb|300px|This is the 1st Congressional District prior to the [[Redistricting in South Carolina|2010 redistricting]].]]
 
::''See also: [[Redistricting in South Carolina]]''
 
::''See also: [[Redistricting in South Carolina]]''
 
The S.C. Legislature adopted a new redistricting map, and the Department of Justice approved it in October 2010. As a result, South Carolina gained a new, [[South Carolina's 7th Congressional District| 7th Congressional District]]. <ref>[http://www.rollcall.com/news/DOJ-Approves-New-South-Carolina-Map-209888-1.html ''Roll Call'' ''DOJ approves new South Carolina map'' January 10, 2012]</ref>
 
The S.C. Legislature adopted a new redistricting map, and the Department of Justice approved it in October 2010. As a result, South Carolina gained a new, [[South Carolina's 7th Congressional District| 7th Congressional District]]. <ref>[http://www.rollcall.com/news/DOJ-Approves-New-South-Carolina-Map-209888-1.html ''Roll Call'' ''DOJ approves new South Carolina map'' January 10, 2012]</ref>
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==See also==
 
==See also==
 
*[[Redistricting in South Carolina]]
 
*[[Redistricting in South Carolina]]
*[[South Carolina's 1st congressional district elections, 2012]]
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*[[South Carolina's 1st Congressional District elections, 2012]]
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}

Revision as of 18:45, 19 December 2013

South Carolina's 1st Congressional District
SC 1st District Map.PNG
Current incumbentMark Sanford Republican Party
Population667,388
Gender48% Male, 52% Female
Race75.2% White, 18.6% Black, 1.8% Asian
Ethnicity6.9% Hispanic
Unemployment10.2%
Median household income$56,079
High school graduation rate90.9%
College graduation rate34.9%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
The 1st Congressional District of South Carolina is a congressional district located along the state's eastern coastline.

South Carolina's 1st Congressional District is located in the southeastern portion of the state The first district stretches along the eastern coast of South Carolina, from Seabrook Island to the North Carolina border. It includes most of Charleston and Myrtle Beach. It also includes portions of Berkeley, Chestleston, Dorchester and Beaufort counties.[1]

The district previously included North Charleston, and parts of Dorchester, Berkeley, and Georgetown counties. It also included Myrtle Beach.

The current representative of the 1st Congressional District is Mark Sanford (R). A special election was held on May 7, 2013. The seat became vacant after Tim Scott was appointed to the United States Senate.

Elections

2014

See also: South Carolina's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

The 1st Congressional District of South Carolina will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014.

2013

See also: South Carolina's 1st Congressional District special election, 2013

The 1st Congressional District of South Carolina held a special election for the U.S. House of Representatives on May 7, 2013. The election filled the vacancy left by the appointment of Representative Tim Scott (R) to the United States Senate.

Mark Sanford (R) defeated Elizabeth Colbert-Busch in the race.

U.S. House, South Carolina District 1 General Special Election, 2013
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMark Sanford 54% 77,600
     Democratic Elizabeth Colbert-Busch 45.2% 64,961
     Green Eugene Platt 0.5% 690
     N/A Write-in 0.3% 384
Total Votes 143,635
Source: South Carolina Election Board, "Official Special Election Results"

2012

See also: South Carolina's 1st Congressional District elections, 2012

The 1st Congressional District of South Carolina held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent Timothy Scott won re-election in the district.[2]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 1 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Bobbie Rose 35.7% 103,557
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTimothy Scott Incumbent 62% 179,908
     Libertarian Keith Blandford 2.2% 6,334
     N/A Write-In 0.1% 214
Total Votes 290,013
Source: South Carolina State Election Commission "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Tim Scott won election to the United States House. He defeated Ben Frasier (D), Robert Dobbs (Working Families), Rob Groce (G), Keith Blandford (L) and Jimmy Wood (I) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 1 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTim Scott 65.7% 152,755
     Democratic Ben Frasier 28.8% 67,008
     Working Families Rob Groce 1.8% 4,148
     Green Robert Dobbs 1.4% 3,369
     Libertarian Keith Blandford 1.2% 2,750
     Independence Jimmy Wood 1.1% 2,489
Total Votes 232,519

2008
On November 4, 2008, Henry E. Brown, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Linda Ketner (D) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 1 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHenry E. Brown, Jr. incumbent 51.9% 177,540
     Democratic Linda Ketner 47.9% 163,724
     N/A Write-in 0.2% 615
Total Votes 341,879

2006
On November 7, 2006, Henry E. Brown, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Randy Maatta (D) and James E. Dunn (G) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 1 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHenry E. Brown, Jr. incumbent 59.9% 115,766
     Democratic Randy Maatta 37.9% 73,218
     Green Party James E. Dunn 2.2% 4,287
     N/A Write-in 0.1% 104
Total Votes 193,375

2004
On November 2, 2004, Henry E. Brown, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated James E. Dunn (G) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 1 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHenry E. Brown, Jr. incumbent 87.8% 186,448
     Green Party James E. Dunn 12.1% 25,674
     N/A Write-in 0.1% 186
Total Votes 212,308

2002
On November 5, 2002, Henry E. Brown, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated James E. Dunn (United Citizens) and Joe Innella (Natural Law) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 1 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHenry E. Brown, Jr. incumbent 89.6% 127,562
     United Citizens James E. Dunn 6.9% 9,841
     Natural Law Joe Innella 3.5% 4,965
     N/A Write-in 0% 57
Total Votes 142,425

2000
On November 7, 2000, Henry E. Brown, Jr. won election to the United States House. He defeated Andy Brack (D), Bill Woolsey (L) and Bob Batchelder (Natural Law) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, South Carolina District 1 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHenry E. Brown, Jr. 60.9% 139,597
     Democratic Andy Brack 36% 82,622
     Libertarian Bill Woolsey 2.6% 6,010
     Natural Law Bob Batchelder 0.5% 1,110
     N/A Write-in 0% 40
Total Votes 229,379

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 1st Congressional District prior to the 2010 redistricting.
See also: Redistricting in South Carolina

The S.C. Legislature adopted a new redistricting map, and the Department of Justice approved it in October 2010. As a result, South Carolina gained a new, 7th Congressional District. [9]

External links

See also

References