Difference between revisions of "South Carolina Gubernatorial Elections, Amendment 1 (2012)"

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{{tnr}}The '''South Carolina Government Restructure Amendment''' may appear on the [[South Carolina 2012 ballot measures|November 2012 ballot]] in the state of [[South Carolina]] as a {{lrcafull}}.  The measure would allow candidates for governor to select their running mates for lieutenant governor and the chief executive to appoint an education head.  
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{{tnr}}The '''South Carolina Government Restructure Amendment''' may appear on the [[South Carolina 2012 ballot measures|November 2012 ballot]] in the state of [[South Carolina]] as a {{lrcafull}}.  The measure would allow candidates for governor to select their running mates for lieutenant governor and the chief executive to appoint an education head.<ref> [http://www.beaumontenterprise.com/news/article/South-Carolina-s-week-of-legislative-action-1348424.php ''Beaumont Enterprise'', "South Carolina's week of legislative action", April 22, 2011]</ref>
 
==Path to the ballot==
 
==Path to the ballot==
 
[[Article XVI, South Carolina Constitution#Section 1|Section 1 of Article XVI]] of the [[South Carolina Constitution]] says that a legislatively-referred amendment can go on the ballot if approved by a 2/3rds vote of each house of the [[South Carolina State Legislature]].
 
[[Article XVI, South Carolina Constitution#Section 1|Section 1 of Article XVI]] of the [[South Carolina Constitution]] says that a legislatively-referred amendment can go on the ballot if approved by a 2/3rds vote of each house of the [[South Carolina State Legislature]].

Revision as of 11:28, 25 April 2011

The South Carolina Government Restructure Amendment may appear on the November 2012 ballot in the state of South Carolina as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. The measure would allow candidates for governor to select their running mates for lieutenant governor and the chief executive to appoint an education head.[1]

Path to the ballot

Section 1 of Article XVI of the South Carolina Constitution says that a legislatively-referred amendment can go on the ballot if approved by a 2/3rds vote of each house of the South Carolina State Legislature.

See also

References