Difference between revisions of "South Dakota State Legislature"

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===2013===
 
===2013===
 
::''See also: [[Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions]]''
 
::''See also: [[Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions]]''
In 2013, the Legislature was in session from January 8 through March 25.
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In 2013, the Legislature was in session from January 8 to March 25.
  
 
====Major issues====
 
====Major issues====

Revision as of 17:44, 3 January 2014

South Dakota State Legislature

Seal of South Dakota.jpg
General Information
Type:   State legislature
Term limits:   4 terms (8 years) in Senate, same for House
2014 session start:   January 8, 2013
Website:   Official Legislature Page
Leadership
Senate President:   Matthew Michels (R)
House Speaker:  Brian Gosch (R)
Majority Leader:   Tim Rave (R) (Senate),
David Lust (R) (House)
Minority leader:   Jason Frerichs (D) (Senate),
Bernie Hunhoff (D) (House)
Structure
Members:  35 (Senate), 70 (House)
Length of term:   2 years (Senate), 2 years (House)
Authority:   Art III, Sec 1, South Dakota Constitution
Salary:   $12,000/2 years + per diem
Elections
Last Election:  November 6, 2012
35 seats (Senate)
70 seats (House)
Next election:  November 4, 2014
Redistricting:  South Dakota Legislature has control
The South Dakota State Legislature is the legislative branch of the government of South Dakota. It is a bicameral legislative body, consisting of the Senate which has 35 members, and the House of Representatives, which has 70 members. The two houses are similar in most respects; the Senate alone holds the right to confirm gubernatorial appointments to certain offices. In addition, the Senate votes by roll call vote, whereas the larger house uses an electronic voting system.

As of July 2014, South Dakota is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas.

Selection of state legislators

Members of both houses of the state legislature are elected in November of every even-numbered year to serve a two-year term. Since 1992, legislators have been limited to serving four consecutive terms in a single house. Vacancies in the legislature are filled by gubernatorial appointment.

State legislators are elected from 35 legislative districts; each district elects one senator and two representatives. In 34 districts, representatives are elected at-large from the entire district. District 28, however, is divided into two house districts, each of which elects one representative. This is meant to ensure greater representation of Native Americans in the legislature.

Legislative districts are redrawn every ten years, following the United States Census.

Sessions

Article III of the South Dakota Constitution establishes when the Legislature is to be in session. Section 7 of Article III states that the Legislature is to meet in regular session each year on the second Tuesday of January.

The South Dakota Constitution also contains provisions concerning special sessions of the Legislature. Section 3 of Article IV allows the Governor of South Dakota to convene a special session of the Legislature. Additionally, Section 31 of Article III allows for a special session to be convened by the presiding officers of both legislative houses upon the written request of two-thirds of the members of each house.

2014

See also: Dates of 2014 state legislative sessions

In 2014, the Legislature is projected to be in session from January 14 through March 31.

2013

See also: Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions

In 2013, the Legislature was in session from January 8 to March 25.

Major issues

Major issues in the 2013 included reforming the state's criminal justice system and approving a balanced budget.[1]

2012

See also: Dates of 2012 state legislative sessions

In 2012, the Legislature was in session from January 10 through March 19.

2011

See also: Dates of 2011 state legislative sessions

In 2011, the Legislature was in session from January 11 through March 28. [2]

2010

See also: Dates of 2010 state legislative sessions

In 2010, the Legislature was in session from January 12 to March 29.[3]

Ethics and transparency

Open States Transparency

See also: Open States' Legislative Data Report Card

The Sunlight Foundation released an "Open Legislative Data Report Card" in March 2013. South Dakota was given a grade of C in the report. The report card evaluated how adequate, complete and accessible legislative data is to the general public. A total of 10 states received an A -- Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Kansas, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia and Washington.[4]

Senate

The South Dakota State Senate is the upper house of the South Dakota State Legislature. It is made up of 35 members, one representing each legislative district. The President of the Senate is the Lieutenant Governor, currently Republican Matthew Michels. The president only votes in the case of a tie. Each member represents an average of 23,262 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[5] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 21,567 residents.[6]

The senate elects one member to serve as President pro tempore; this officer presides in the absence of the president, appoints committees, and assigns legislation to committee. The current President pro tem is Senator Bob Gray, a Republican from Pierre.


Party As of July 2014
     Democratic Party 7
     Republican Party 28
Total 35


The chart below shows the partisan composition of the South Dakota State Senate from 1992-2013.
Partisan composition of the South Dakota State Senate.PNG

House of Representatives

The South Dakota House of Representatives is the lower house of the South Dakota State Legislature. It is made up of 70 members, two from each legislative district. The presiding officer of the House is the Speaker of the House, elected by the members. The current speaker is Republican Thomas Deadrick of Platte. In addition, the House also elects a speaker pro tempore, who presides in the absence of the speaker and traditionally succeeds the speaker in the next legislature. The current speaker pro tempore is Tim Rave, a Republican from Baltic. Each member represents an average of 11,631 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[7] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 10,783.[8]


Party As of July 2014
     Democratic Party 17
     Republican Party 53
Total 70


The chart below shows the partisan composition of the South Dakota State House of Representatives from 1992-2013.
Partisan composition of the South Dakota State House.PNG

History

Partisan balance 1992-2013

Who Runs the States Project
See also: Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States and Ballotpedia:Who Runs the States, South Dakota’’
Partisan breakdown of the South Dakota legislature from 1992-2013

South Dakota State Senate: From 1992-2013, the Democratic Party was the majority in the South Dakota State Senate for two years while the Republicans were the majority for 20 years. The South Dakota State Senate is one of 13 state senates that was Republican for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013. South Dakota was under Republican trifectas for the final 19 years of the study.

Across the country, there were 541 Democratic and 517 Republican state senates from 1992 to 2013.

South Dakota State House of Representatives: During every year from 1992-2013, the Republican Party was the majority in the South Dakota State House of Representatives. The South Dakota House of Representatives is one of nine state Houses that was Republican for more than 80 percent of the years between 1992-2013. South Dakota was under Republican trifectas for the final 19 years of the study.

Across the country, there were 577 Democratic and 483 Republican State Houses of Representatives from 1992 to 2013.

Over the course of the 22-year study, state governments became increasingly more partisan. At the outset of the study period (1992), 18 of the 49 states with partisan legislatures had single-party trifectas and 31 states had divided governments. In 2013, only 13 states have divided governments, while single-party trifectas held sway in 36 states, the most in the 22 years studied.

The chart below shows the partisan composition of the Office of the Governor of South Dakota, the South Dakota State Senate and the South Dakota House of Representatives from 1992-2013. Partisan composition of South Dakota state government(1992-2013).PNG

SQLI and partisanship

The chart below depicts the partisanship of the South Dakota state government and the state's SQLI ranking for the years studied. For the SQLI, the states were ranked from 1-50, with 1 being the best and 50 the worst. For all but two years of the study, South Dakota had Republican trifectas. For over half the years of the study South Dakota was ranked in the top-10. Its best ranking, finishing 5th, occurred in 2010, and its worst, finishing 14th, occurred in 2000.

Chart displaying the partisanship of the South Dakota government from 1992-2013 and the State Quality of Life Index (SQLI).

Legislators

Salaries

See also: Comparison of state legislative salaries

As of 2013, members of the South Dakota Legislature are paid $12,000/two-year term. Legislators receive $110/day per diem. Rates are set by the legislature.[9]

Pension

South Dakota does not provide pensions for legislators.[10]

When sworn in

See also: When state legislators assume office after a general election

South Dakota legislators assume office the first day of session after election (Jan. 11).

Joint legislative committees

The South Dakota State Legislature has one joint standing committee:

External links

References