State house elections, 2014

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45 state lower houses will hold general elections for state representatives in November, 2014. This is in addition to the 42 state senates that will hold general elections in the midterm election year.

There are 49 state houses (Nebraska doesn't have one). The four state houses that are not holding a general election for state representatives in November 2014 are Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey and Virginia.

See also: State legislative elections, 2014 and State senate elections, 2014

By the numbers

Number of seats in all 50 houses: 5,411
Number of seats up for election in the 45 houses with November 2014 elections: 4,958
 % of total (all 50 states) houses seats up for election in 2014: 91.6%

States

Alabama House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates
Candidate ballot accecss
Ballot Access Requirements Final.jpg

Find detailed information on ballot access requirements in all 50 states and Washington D.C.

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Alabama House of Representatives:

Alabama House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 37 33
     Republican Party 66 72
     Independent 1 0
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 105 105

Candidates unopposed by a major party

2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

In 65 of the 105 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 18 Democrats and 47 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 40 of the 105 districts up for election.

Primary challenges

A total of 31 incumbents faced primary competition on June 3. 16 incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 58 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. Every incumbent facing primary competition defeated his or her opponent. The state representatives that faced primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

16 incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 89 (84.8%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, four Democrats, eleven Republicans and one Independent, can be found above.

Alaska House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Alaska House of Representatives:

Alaska House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 14 16
     Republican Party 26 23
     Independent 0 1
Total 40 40

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 13 of the 40 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. Nine Democrats and four Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances. Candidates from both major parties faced off in the general election in 27 of the 40 districts up for election. Redistricting occurred in 2013, causing many incumbents to change districts.

Primary challenges

Three incumbents faced primary competition on August 19. Five incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 32 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives facing primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Five incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 35 (87.5%) ran for re-election. Because of redistricting, however, six district races did not feature a current state representative. A list of those incumbents, all Republicans, can be found above.

Arizona House of Representatives elections, 2014

Candidate ballot accecss
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Find detailed information on ballot access requirements in all 50 states and Washington D.C.
See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Arizona House of Representatives:

Arizona House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 24 22
     Republican Party 36 38
Total 60 60

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 27 (45.0%) of the 60 seats up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 11 Democrats and 16 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 33 (55.0%) of the 60 seats up for election.

Primary challenges

A total of 18 incumbents faced primary competition on August 26. Nineteen incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 23 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives that faced primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Nineteen incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 41 (68.3%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, eight Democrats and 11 Republicans, can be found above.

Arkansas House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Arkansas House of Representatives:

Arkansas House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 48 36
     Republican Party 51 64
     Green Party 1 0
Total 100 100

Candidates unopposed by a major party

Most races were expected to be lightly contested or not at all. In 66 of the 100 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 29 Democrats and 37 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

However, the amount of competitive races presented the possibility of having the scales tipped in Arkansas. Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 34 of the 100 districts up for election. Four of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Nine other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Those competitive districts were:

Competitive

  • District 41: Danny Knight (D) was defeated by Karilyn Brown (R) in the general election for the seat vacated by incumbent Jim Nickels (D). Nickels won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 52: Radius H. Baker (D) was defeated by Dwight Tosh (R) in the general election. Incumbent John "Hutch" Hutchison, defeated in the Republican primary, won by a margin of victory of 0.50 in 2012.
  • District 61: Incumbent Scott Baltz (D) defeated Doug Driesel (R) in the general election. Baltz won by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 73: Incumbent John Catlett (D) was defeated by Mary Bentley (R) in the general election. Catlett beat her by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.

Previously competitive, now unopposed
Two districts that held a competitive election in 2012 have only one major party candidate in 2014.

  • District 13: Incumbent David Hillman (D) ran unopposed in the Democratic primary and was unchallenged in the general election. Hillman won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 39: Incumbent Mark Lowery (R) ran unopposed in the Republican primary and was unchallenged in the general election. Lowery won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of five incumbents faced primary competition on May 20. 29 incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 66 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives facing primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

29 incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 71 (71.0%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, 11 Democrats and 18 Republicans, can be found above.

California State Assembly elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the California State Assembly:

California State Assembly
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 55 52
     Republican Party 24 28
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 80 80

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 20 of the 80 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 13 Democrats and 7 Republicans were guaranteed election in November barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 60 of the 80 districts up for election. Three of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Five other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 36: Incumbent Steve Fox (D) was defeated by Tom Lackey (R) in the general election. Fox won by a margin of victory of 0.1 percent in 2012.
  • District 40: Kathleen Henry (D) was defeated by Marc Steinorth (R) in the general election for the seat vacated by incumbent Mike Morrell (R). Morrell won by a margin of victory of 0.8 percent in 2012.
  • District 65: Incumbent Sharon Quirk-Silva (D) was defeated by Young Kim (R) in the general election. Quirk-Silva won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.

Mildly Competitive

  • District 8: Incumbent Ken Cooley (D) defeated Douglas Haaland (R) in the general election. Cooley won by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 32: Incumbent Rudy Salas (D) defeated Pedro Rios (R) in the general election. Cooley won by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.
  • District 42: Karalee Hargrove (D) was defeated by Chad Mayes (R) in the general election for the seat vacated by incumbent Brian Nestande (R). Nestande won by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 44: Jacqui Irwin (D) defeated Rob McCoy (R) in the general election for the seat vacated by incumbent Jeff Gorell (R). Gorell won by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.
  • District 66: Incumbent Al Muratsuchi (D) was defeated by David Hadley (R) in the general election. Muratsuchi won by a margin of victory of 10 percent in 2012.

Previously Competitive, Now Unopposed

  • District 60: Incumbent Eric Linder (R) was unopposed in the general election. Linder won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 42 incumbents faced primary competition on June 3. Twenty-three incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 15 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The Assembly members that faced primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

23 incumbent Assembly members did not run for re-election, while 57 (71.3%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, fourteen Democrats and nine Republicans, can be found above.

Colorado House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Colorado House of Representatives:

Colorado House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 37 34
     Republican Party 28 31
Total 65 65

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 14 (21.5%) of the 65 seats up for election, there was only one major party candidate running for election. Three Democrats and eleven Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 51 (78.5%) of the 65 districts up for election. Three of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Six other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

Mildly competitive

  • District 3: Incumbent Daniel Kagan (D) was defeated by Candice Benge (R) in the general election. Kagan won by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.
  • District 22: Justin Everett (R) defeated Mary K. Parker (D) in the general election. Everett won by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 27: Incumbent Libby Szabo (R) defeated Wade Michael Norris (D) in the general election. Szabo won by a margin of victory of 10 percent in 2012.
  • District 28: Incumbent Brittany Pettersen (D) defeated Stacia Kuhn (R) in the general election. Pettersen won by a margin of victory of 10 percent in 2012.
  • District 29: In a 2012 rematch, incumbent Tracy Kraft-Tharp (D) defeated Robert Edgar Ramirez (R) in the general election. Kraft-Tharp won by a margin of victory of 8 percent in 2012.
  • District 37: Nancy Cronk (D) was defeated by Jack Tate (R) in the general election. Retiring incumbent Spencer Swalm (R) won by a margin of victory of 8 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

Two (3.1%) incumbents faced primary competition on June 24. Seventeen incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 46 (70.8%) incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives facing primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Seventeen (26.2%) incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 48 (73.8%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, six Democrats and eleven Republicans, can be found above.

Connecticut House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Connecticut House of Representatives:

Connecticut House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 97 87
     Republican Party 54 64
Total 151 151

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 44 of the 151 seats up for election, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 27 Democrats and 17 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 107 of the 151 districts up for election. Nine of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Eleven other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 2: Incumbent Dan Carter (R) defeated Candace Fay (D) in the general election. Carter won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 21: Incumbent Mike Demicco (D) defeated Patty Stoddard (R) in the general election. Demicco won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 42: Incumbent Timothy Russell Bowles (D) was defeated by Mike France (R) in the general election. Bowles won by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 61: Incumbent Tami Zawistowski (R) defeated Joe Doering (D) in the general election. Former incumbent Elaine O'Brien (D) won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012. Zawistowski won a 2014 special election by a margin of victory of 16 percent.
  • District 89: Incumbent Lezlye Zupkus (R) defeated Vickie Orsini Nardello (D) in the general election. Zupkus won as a Democrat by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 105: Incumbent Theresa W. Conroy (D) defeated Len Green, Jr. (R) in the general election. Conroy won by a margin of victory of 0.8 percent in 2012.
  • District 106: Incumbent Mitch Bolinsky (R) defeated Matt Cole (D) in the general election. Bolinsky won by a margin of victory of 0.4 percent in 2012.
  • District 119: Incumbent James Maroney (D) was defeated by Pam Staneski (R) in the general election. Maroney won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 144: Incumbent Michael L. Molgano (R) was defeated by Caroline Simmons (D) in the general election. Molgano won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

Six incumbents faced primary competition on August 12. Eighteen incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 127 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representative facing primary competition is:

Retiring incumbents

Eighteen incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 133 (88.1%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, ten Democrats and eight Republicans, can be found above.

Delaware House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Delaware House of Representatives:

Delaware House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 27 25
     Republican Party 14 16
Total 41 41

Candidates unopposed by a major party

2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

In 19 of the 41 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 13 Democrats and six Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 22 of the 41 districts up for election. Three of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Four other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Those competitive districts were:

Competitive

Mildly Competitive

Primary challenges

Seven incumbents faced primary competition on September 9. Two incumbent did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 32 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives that faced primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Two incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 39 (95.1%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, both Democrats, can be found above.

Florida House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Florida House of Representatives:

Florida House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 45 37
     Republican Party 74 82
     Vacancy 1 1
Total 120 120

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 69 (57.5%) of the 120 seats up for election, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 28 Democrats and 41 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 51 of the 120 districts up for election. Twelve of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Eight other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Two seats that held competitive elections in 2012 have only one major party candidate in 2014. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 29: Incumbent Mike Clelland (D) was defeated by Scott Plakon (R) in the general election. Clelland won by a margin of victory of 0.2 percent in 2012.
  • District 41: Incumbent John Wood (R) defeated Celestyne Williams (D) in the general election. Wood won by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 42: Incumbent Mike LaRosa (R) defeated Chad Carnell (D) in the general election. LaRosa won by a margin of victory of 0.8 percent in 2012.
  • District 47: Incumbent Linda Stewart (D) was defeated by Mike Miller (R) in the general election. Stewart won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 53: Incumbent John Tobia (R) defeated Santa Isabel Wright (D), David A. Kearns (I) and Kourtney Ann Waldron (I) in the general election. Tobia won as a Democrat by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 59: Incumbent Ross Spano (R) defeated Donna Lee Fore (D) in the general election. Spano won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 63: Incumbent Mark Alan Danish (D) was defeated by Shawn Harrison (R) in the general election. Danish won by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 69: Incumbent Kathleen Peters (R) defeated Scott T. Orsini (D) in the general election. Peters won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 84: Incumbent Larry Lee, Jr. (D) defeated Rob Siedlecki (R) in the general election. Lee won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 89: Incumbent Bill Hager (R) defeated David Ryan Silvers (D) in the general election. Hager won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 114: Incumbent Erik Fresen (R) defeated Daisy Josefina Baez (D) and Ross Hancock (I) in the general election. Fresen won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 115: Incumbent Michael Bileca (R) defeated Kristopher D. Decossard (D) in the general election. Bileca won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Previously Competitive, Now Unopposed

  • District 90: Incumbent Lori Berman (D) ran unopposed in both the Democratic primary and the general election. Berman won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 120: Incumbent Holly Merrill Raschein (R) ran unopposed in both the Republican primary and the general election. Raschein won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 14 incumbents faced primary competition on August 26. Seventeen incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 89 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives that faced primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Seventeen incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 103 (85.8%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, six Democrats and eleven Republicans, can be found above.

Georgia House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Georgia House of Representatives:

Georgia House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 60 59
     Republican Party 118 120
     Independent 1 1
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 180 180

Candidates unopposed by a major party

2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

In 147 (81.7%) of the 180 seats up for election, there was only one major party candidate running for election. An unopposed Independent incumbent is included in that number. A total of 52 Democrats, 94 Republicans and 1 Independent were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 33 of the 180 districts up for election. Three of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Two other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 66: Incumbent Kimberly Alexander (D) defeated Bob Snelling (R) in the general election. Alexander won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 105: Incumbent Joyce Chandler (R) defeated Renita Hamilton (D) in the general election. Chandler won by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 138: Incumbent Mike Cheokas (R) defeated Kevin T. Brown (D) in the general election. Cheokas won by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

Previously Competitive, Now Unopposed
One district that held a competitive election in 2012 had only one major party candidate in 2014.

  • District 12: Incumbent Eddie Lumsden (R) defeated M. Kyle Hubbard in the Republican primary. No Democratic candidate filed to run. Lumsden won by a margin of victory of three percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 36 incumbents faced primary competition on May 20. Ten incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 134 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives facing primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Ten incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 93 (93.0%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, two Democrats and eight Republicans, can be found above.

Hawaii House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Hawaii House of Representatives:

Hawaii House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 44 43
     Republican Party 7 8
Total 51 51

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 14 of the 51 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. Fourteen Democrats were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances. Candidates from both major parties faced off in the general election in 37 of the 51 districts up for election. Three of those seats held competitive elections in 2012, with a margin of victory of 0 to 5 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

Primary challenges

Fifteen incumbents faced primary competition on August 9. Three incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 33 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state senators that faced primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Three incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 48 (94.1%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, two Democrats and one Republican, can be found above.

Idaho House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Idaho House of Representatives:

Idaho House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 13 14
     Republican Party 57 56
Total 70 70

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 31 of the 70 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 3 Democrats and 28 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 39 of the 70 districts up for election. Four of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Six other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 5A: Incumbent Lucinda L. Agidius (R) was defeated by Paulette E. Jordan (D) in the general election. Agidius won by a margin of victory of 0.6 percent in 2012.
  • District 6B: Incumbent John Rusche (D) defeated Jim Evans (R) in the general election. Rusche won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 26A: Incumbent Steve Miller (R) defeated Richard Fosbury (D) in the general election. Miller won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 29A: Mark Nye (D) defeated Matthew Bloxham (R) and Matthew Larsen (L) in the general election for the seat vacated by incumbent Carolyn Meline (D). Meline won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

  • District 5B: Caroline Nilsson Troy (R) defeated Gary Osborn (D) and David R. Suswal (I) in the general election for the seat vacated by incumbent Shirley Gene Ringo (D). Ringo won by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 6A: Incumbent Thyra K. Stevenson (R) was defeated by Dan Rudolph (D) in the general election. Stevenson won by a margin of victory of 8 percent in 2012.
  • District 10A: Incumbent Brandon Hixon (R) defeated Travis Manning (D) in the general election. Hixon won by a margin of victory of 8 percent in 2012.
  • District 15B: Incumbent Patrick McDonald (R) defeated John Hart (D) in the general election. McDonald won by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.
  • District 16B: Incumbent Hy Kloc (D) defeated Jim Silsby (R) in the general election. Kloc won by a margin of victory of 8 percent in 2012.
  • District 29B: Incumbent Elaine Smith (D) defeated Terrel "Ned" Tovey (R) in the general election. Smith won by a margin of victory of 8 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 22 incumbents faced primary competition on March 18. Nine incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 44 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives facing primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Nine incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 61 (87.1%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, four Democrats and five Republicans, can be found above.

Illinois House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Illinois House of Representatives:

Illinois House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 70 71
     Republican Party 47 47
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 118 118

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 66 of the 118 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 40 Democrats and 26 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 52 of the 118 districts up for election. Three of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. One other election was mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 7 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 79: Incumbent Katherine Cloonen (D) defeated primary challenger John Howard and dispatched Glenn Nixon (R) in the general election. Cloonen won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.21 percent in 2012.
  • District 112: Incumbent Dwight Kay (R) defeated challenger Cullen L. Cullen (D). Kay won by a margin of victory of 0.68 percent in 2012.
  • District 71: Incumbent Mike Smiddy (D) defeated challenger Jim Wozniak (R). Smiddy won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

  • District 55: Incumbent Martin Moylan (D) defeated challenger Mel Thillens (R). Moylan won by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 13 incumbents faced primary competition on March 18. Thirteen incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 92 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives facing primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Twelve incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 106 (89.8%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, ten Republicans and two Democrats, can be found above.

Indiana House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Indiana House of Representatives:

Indiana House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 31 29
     Republican Party 69 71
Total 100 100

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 50 of the 100 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 18 Democrats and 32 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 60 of the 100 districts up for election. Eight of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Eight other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent. Those competitive districts were:

Competitive

  • District 4: Incumbent Ed Soliday (R) defeated Debora "Deb" Porter (D) in the general election. Soliday won by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 15: Incumbent Hal Slager (R) defeated Jim Wieser (D) in the general election. Slager won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 35: Incumbent L. Jack Lutz (R) was defeated by Melanie Wright (D) in the general election. Lutz won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 42: Incumbent Alan Morrison (R) defeated Mark C. Spelbring (D) in the general election. Morrison won by a margin of victory of 0.40 percent in 2012.
  • District 45: Incumbent Bionca Gambill (D) was defeated by Bruce Borders (R) in the general election. Gambill was appointed in June to replace Kreg Battles (D), who resigned in May. Battles won by a margin of victory of 0.30 percent in 2012.
  • District 56: Incumbent Richard "Dick" Hamm (R) defeated Phillip Pflum (D) in the general election. Hamm won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 66: Incumbent Terry Goodin (D) defeated Lisa Seng Shadday (R) in the general election. Goodin won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 87: Incumbent Christina Hale (D) defeated Mike Friedman (R) in the general election. Hale won by a margin of victory of 0.20 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 9 incumbents faced primary competition on May 6. Three incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 88 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives that faced primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Three incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 97 (97.0%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, all Republicans, can be found above.

Iowa House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Iowa House of Representatives:

Iowa House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 47 43
     Republican Party 53 57
Total 100 100

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 54 of the 100 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 28 Democrats and 26 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 46 of the 100 districts up for election. Fifteen of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Two other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 7: Incumbent Tedd Gassman (R) defeated Dave Grussing (D) in the general election. Gassman won by a margin of victory of 0.3 percent in 2012.
  • District 15: Charlie McConkey (D) defeated John Blue (R) in the general election. Retiring incumbent Mark A. Brandenburg (R) won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 26: Incumbent Scott Ourth (D) defeated James L. Butler (R) in the general election. Ourth won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 30: Incumbent Joe Riding (D) was defeated by Zach Nunn (R) in the general election. Riding won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 43: Incumbent Chris Hagenow (R) defeated Kim Robinson (D) in the general election. Hagenow won by a margin of victory of 0.1 percent in 2012.
  • District 47: Incumbent Chip Baltimore (R) defeated Hans Erickson (D) in the general election. Baltimore won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 55: [Darrel Branhagen]] (R) defeated Rick Edwards (D) in the general election. Retiring incumbent Roger Thomas (D) won by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 58: Incumbent Brian Moore (R) faced Kim Huckstadt (D) in the general election. Moore won by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 60: Incumbent Walt Rogers (R) defeated Karyn Finn (D) in the general election. Rogers won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 63: Incumbent Sandy Salmon (R) defeated Teresa Meyer (D) in the general election. Salmon won by a margin of victory of 0.7 percent in 2012.
  • District 68: Incumbent Daniel Lundby (D) was defeated by Ken Rizer (R) in the general election. Lundby won by a margin of victory of 0.7 percent in 2012.
  • District 72: Incumbent Dean Fisher (R) defeated Ben Westphal (D) in the general election. Fisher won by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 76: Incumbent David Maxwell (R) defeated Eric Pederson (D) in the general election. Maxwell won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 92: Incumbent Frank B. Wood (D) defeated Ross C. Paustian (R) in the general election. Wood won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 95: Incumbent Quentin Stanerson (R) defeated Kristi Keast (D) in the general election. Stanerson won by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

  • District 13: Incumbent Chris Hall (D) defeated Nick Noyes (R) in the general election. Hall won by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 91: Gary Carlson (R) defeated John Dabeet (D) in the general election. Retiring incumbent Mark S. Lofgren (R) won by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.

Previously Competitive, Now Unopposed
One district that held a competitive election in 2012 has only one major party candidate in 2014.

  • District 39: Incumbent Jake Highfill (R) defeated challengers Taylor Egly and Jerry Kinder in the Republican primary. No Democratic candidate filed to run. Highfill won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 56: Incumbent Patti Ruff (D) faced no primary competition and has no challenger in the general election. Ruff won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 80: Incumbent Larry Sheets (R) faced no primary competition and has no challenger in the general election. Sheets won by a margin of victory of 0.8 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

Four incumbents faced primary competition on June 3. Eleven incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 85 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. Every incumbent facing primary competition advanced past the June 3 primary. The state representatives that faced primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Eleven incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 89 (89.0%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, four Democrats and seven Republicans, can be found above.

Kansas House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Kansas House of Representatives:

Kansas House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 32 27
     Republican Party 93 98
Total 125 125
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 50 (40.0%) of the 125 districts up for election in 2014, one major party candidate ran unopposed in the general election. A total of 12 Democrats and 38 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 75 (60.0%) of the 125 districts up for election. Nine of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Fourteen other elections were moderately competitive with a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent. One seat that is uncontested in 2014 held a mildly competitive election in 2012. Those districts were:

Competitive

Primary challenges

A total of 21 incumbents (16.8%), all Republicans, faced primary competition on August 5. Thirteen incumbents (10.4%) did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 91 (72.8%) incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The primary challenges included:

Two incumbents, Joshua Powell (R) from District 50 and Allan Rothlisberg (R) from District 65, were defeated by primary challengers.

Retiring incumbents

Thirteen incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 112 (89.6%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, three Democrats and 10 Republicans, can be found above.

Kentucky House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Kentucky House of Representatives:

Kentucky House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 54 54
     Republican Party 46 46
Total 100 100

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 49 of the 100 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 25 Democrats and 24 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 51 of the 100 districts up for election. Four of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Three other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 7: Incumbent Suzanne Miles (R) defeated John Warren (D) in the general election. Miles won election in a 2013 special election after former incumbent John Arnold, Jr. (D) left office. Arnold won by a margin of victory of 0.03 percent in 2012.
  • District 13: Incumbent James Glenn, Jr. (D) defeated challenger Jeremy Warfield in the Democratic primary. Glenn defeated Alan Braden (R) in the general election. Glenn won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 27: Incumbent Jeff Greer (D) defeated challenger Rachelle Frazier (R) in the general election. Greer won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 91: Incumbent Hubert Collins (D) defeated challenger Sid Allen (D) in the Democratic primary. Bobby W. McCool defeated Dewie Ison and William Scott Wells in the Republican primary. Collins won by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

  • District 49: This seat was open, as incumbent Russell Webber (R) ran for re-election in District 26. Linda Howlett Belcher defeated Jonathan Cacciatore in the Democratic primary, while Michael J. Nemes was unopposed in the Republican primary. Webber won by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.
  • District 50: Incumbent David Floyd (R) defeated challenger Audrey Haydon (D) in the general election. Floyd won by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 56: Incumbent James Kay (D) defeated challenger Ryan Schwartz (R) in the general election. Kay won election in a 2013 special election after former incumbent Carl Rollins, II (D) left office. Rollins won by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 11 incumbents faced primary competition on May 20. Seven incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 82 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. One incumbent, W. Keith Hall (D), was defeated in his primary. The state representatives that faced competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Seven incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 93 (93.0%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, three Democrats and four Republicans, can be found above.

Maine House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state houses

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Maine House of Representatives:

Maine House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 88 79
     Republican Party 57 68
     Independent 4 4
     Non-voting 3 3
     Vacancy 2 0
Total 154 154

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 21 (13.9%) of the 151 districts up for election in 2014, one major party candidate ran unopposed or faced a third-party challenger in the general election. A total of 10 Democrats and 11 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates (or a major party incumbent and an unaffiliated incumbent) faced off in the general election in 130 (86.1%) of the 151 districts up for election.

Primary challenges

A total of one incumbent (0.7%) faced primary competition on June 10. Forty-nine incumbents (32.4%) did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 101 (66.9%) incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. (Nine of the 49 retiring incumbents ran in the primary but withdrew afterwards.) Three of the incumbents were unenrolled or independent, and hence were not required to run in the primary.

Retiring incumbents

Forty-nine incumbent representatives did not run for re-election or withdrew following the primary, while 102 (67.5%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, 22 Democrats and 27 Republicans, can be found above.

Maryland House of Delegates elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Maryland House of Delegates:

Maryland House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 98 90
     Republican Party 43 51
Total 141 141

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 10 (15.2%) of the 66 districts up for election in 2014, candidates from one major party ran for election. A total of 21 Democrats in nine districts and one Republican in one district were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

At least one candidate from both major parties faced off in the general election in 56 (84.8%) of the 66 districts up for election.

Primary challenges

A total of 72 incumbents faced primary competition on June 24, mostly in multi-member districts. Forty-three incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 26 (18.4%) of the current 141 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. Primary challenges included:

  • District 2A: Incumbents Neil C. Parrott and Andrew A. Serafini defeated David C. Hanlin in the Republican primary.
  • District 5: Incumbent Donald B. Elliott lost his bid for re-election in the seven-way Republican primary.
  • District 24: Incumbent Darren Swain, who was appointed in January 2013, lost his bid for a full term in the ten-way Democratic primary.
  • District 31B: Incumbent Don Dwyer, Jr. lost his bid for re-election in the eight-way Democratic primary.
  • District 40: Incumbent Shawn Z. Tarrant lost his bid for re-election in the 10-way Democratic primary.
  • District 42B: Incumbent Joseph C. Boteler III lost his bid for re-election in the Republican primary.
  • District 43: Incumbents Curt Anderson, Maggie McIntosh and Mary Washington defeated Timothy Vance in the Democratic primary.
  • District 44A: District 44 was split in two by redistricting, with Democratic incumbents Keith E. Haynes, Keiffer J. Mitchell, Jr. and Melvin L. Stukes battling each other for one seat in District 44A. Haynes won the Democratic primary.
  • District 47A: District 47 was split in two by redistricting, with incumbent Michael Summers facing competition from four other Democrats in the race for two seats in District 47A. Summers lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic primary.

Retiring incumbents

Forty-three incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 98 (69.5%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, 28 Democrats and 15 Republicans, can be found above.

Massachusetts House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Massachusetts House of Representatives:

Massachusetts House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 125 126
     Republican Party 29 34
     Vacancy 6 0
Total 160 160

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 100 of the 160 districts up for election in 2014, one major party candidate ran unopposed in the general election. A total of 84 Democrats and 16 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 60 of the 160 districts up for election. Five of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent, and another two held competitive elections but were uncontested in 2014. Three other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent, although two of those seats were uncontested in 2014. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • Second Franklin District: Incumbent Denise Andrews (D) was defeated by Susannah Whipps Lee in the general election. Andrews won by a margin of 1 percent in 2012.
  • Fourth Middlesex District: Incumbent Danielle Gregoire (D) defeated Matthew Elder (R) in the general election. Gregoire won by a margin of 1 percent in 2012.
  • Eighth Plymouth District: Incumbent Angelo D'Emilia (R) defeated Joseph Pacheco (D) in the general election. D'Emilia won by a margin of 5 percent in 2012.
  • Second Worcester District: Incumbent Jonathan Zlotnik (D) defeated Garret Shetrawski (R) in the general election. Zlotnik won by a margin of 2 percent in 2012.
  • Eighth Worcester District: Incumbent Kevin Kuros (R) defeated Joseph Hall (D) in the general election. Kuros won by a margin of 3 percent in 2012.

Previously competitive, now unopposed

  • Second Essex District: Incumbent Leonard Mirra (R) defeated Edward Watson (R) in the Republican primary. The winner will be unopposed in the general election. Mirra won by a margin of 4 percent in 2012.
  • Eighteenth Essex District: Incumbent James Lyons, Jr. ran unchallenged in the general election. Lyons won by a margin of 2 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

  • Sixth Plymouth District: District: Incumbent Josh Cutler (D) defeated Joseph Sheehan (R) in the general election. Cutler won by a margin of 10 percent in 2012.

Previously mildly competitive, now unopposed

  • Tenth Norfolk District: Incumbent Jeffrey Roy (D) ran unchallenged in the general election. Roy won by a margin of 8 percent in 2012.
  • Seventh Plymouth District: Incumbent Geoff Diehl (R) ran unchallenged in the general election. Diehl won by a margin of 8 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 11 incumbents faced primary competition on September 9. Seventeen incumbents did not seek re-election or have resigned in 2014 and another 132 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. Incumbents facing opposition included:

Retiring incumbents

Seventeen incumbent representatives did not run for re-election or have already resigned without a special election following, while 143 of the current 155 incumbents (92.3%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, 15 Democrats and two Republicans, can be found above.

Michigan House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state houses

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Michigan House of Representatives:

Michigan House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 50 47
     Republican Party 59 63
     Independent 1 0
Total 110 110

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In all 110 districts up for election in 2014, candidates from both major parties ran for election. No candidate was uncontested in November.

Eight of the seats up for election held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Thirteen other elections were moderately competitive with a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive:

  • District 23: Incumbent Pat Somerville (R) defeated David Haener (D) in the general election. Somerville won by a margin of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 25: Incumbent Henry Yanez (D) defeated Nick Hawatmeh (R) in the general election. Yanez won by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 41: Incumbent Martin Howrylak (R) defeated Mary Kerwin (D) in the general election. Howrylak won by a margin of victory of 0.92 percent in 2012.
  • District 57: Incumbent Nancy Jenkins (R) defeated Sharon Wimple (D) in the general election. Jenkins won by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 63: Bill Farmer (D) was defeated by David Maturen (R) in the general election. Outgoing incumbent Jase Bolger (R) won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 91: Incumbent Collene Lamonte (D) was defeated by Holly Hughes (R) in the general election. Lamonte won by a margin of victory of 0.83 percent in 2012.
  • District 101: Incumbent Ray Franz (R) defeated Tom Stobie (D) in the general election. Franz won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 110: Incumbent Scott Dianda (D) defeated Bob Michaels (R) in the general election. Dianda won by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive:

  • District 24: Incumbent Anthony Forlini (R) defeated Philip Kurczewski (D) in the general election. Forlini won by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 30: Incumbent Jeff Farrington (R) defeated Bo Karpinsky (D) in the general election. Farrington won by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 39: Incumbent Klint Kesto (R) defeated Sandy Colvin (D) in the general election. Kesto won by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 51: Incumbent Joseph Graves (R) defeated Ken Thomas (D) in the general election. Graves won by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 52: Incumbent Gretchen Driskell (D) defeated John Hochstetler (R) in the general election. Driskell won by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.
  • District 70: Incumbent Rick Outman (R) defeated James Hoisington (D) in the general election. Outman won by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 71: Incumbent Theresa Abed (D) was defeated by Tom Barrett (R) in the general election. Abed won by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 79: Incumbent Al Pscholka (R) defeated Eric Lester (D) in the general election. Pscholka won by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 81: Incumbent Dan Lauwers (R) defeated Bernardo Licata (D) in the general election. Lauwers won by a margin of victory of 8 percent in 2012.
  • District 102: Incumbent Phil Potvin (R) defeated John Ruggles (D) in the general election. Potvin won by a margin of victory of 10 percent in 2012.
  • District 103: Incumbent Bruce Rendon (R) defeated James Cromwell (D) and Brad Richards (I) in the general election. Rendon won by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.
  • District 106: Incumbent Peter Pettalia (R) defeated Robert Kennedy (D) in the general election. Pettalia won by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 108: Incumbent Ed McBroom defeated Grant Carlson (D) in the general election. McBroom won by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

Fifteen incumbents faced primary competition on August 5. Forty incumbents did not run for re-election in 2014 and another 55 of the current 110 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives facing primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Forty incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 70 (63.6%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents (19 Democrats, 20 Republicans and one independent) can be found above.

Minnesota House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state houses

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Minnesota House of Representatives, but lost it to the Republican Party:

Minnesota House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 73 61
     Republican Party 61 73
Total 134 134

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 9 (6.7%) of the 134 districts up for election, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of one Democrats and eight Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 125 (93.3%) of the 134 districts up for election. Seventeen of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Nineteen other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent; another two seats were mildly competitive but were uncontested in 2014.

Competitive:

  • District 1B: Incumbent Deb Kiel (R) defeated Eric Bergeson (D) in the general election. Kiel won by a margin of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 2B: Incumbent Steve Green (R) defeated David Sobieski (D) in the general election. Green won by a margin of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 8B: Incumbent Mary Franson (R) defeated Jay Sieling (D) in the general election. Franson won by a margin of 0.05 percent in 2012.
  • District 10B: Incumbent Joe Radinovich (D) was defeated by Dale Lueck (R) in the general election. Radinovich won by a margin of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 11B: Incumbent Tim Faust (D) was defeated by Jason Rarick (R) in the general election. Faust won by a margin of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 12A: Incumbent Jay McNamar (D) was defeated by Jeff Backer in the general election. McNamar won by a margin of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 15A: Incumbent Sondra Erickson (R) defeated James Rittenour (D) in the general election. Erickson won by a margin of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 17B: Incumbent Mary Sawatzky (D) was defeated by Dave Baker (R) in the general election. Sawatsky won by a margin of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 24A: Incumbent John Petersburg (R) defeated Beverly Cashman (D) in the general election. Petersburg won by a margin of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 27A: Incumbent Shannon Savick (D) was defeated by Peggy Bennett (R) in the general election. Savick won by a margin of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 32B: Incumbent Bob Barrett (R) defeated Laurie Warner (D) in the general election. Barrett won by a margin of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 36A: Incumbent Mark Uglem (R) defeated Jefferson Fietek (D) in the general election. Uglem won by a margin of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 38B: Incumbent Matt Dean (R) defeated Greg Pariseau (D) in the general election. Dean won by a margin of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 44A: Incumbent Sarah Anderson (R) defeated Audrey Britton (D) in the general election. Anderson won by a margin of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 48A: Incumbent Yvonne Selcer (D) defeated Kirk Stensrud (R) in the general election. Selcer won by a margin of 0.82 percent in 2012.
  • District 51B: Incumbent Laurie Halverson (D) defeated Jen Wilson (R) in the general election. Halverson won by a margin of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 56B: Incumbent Will Morgan (D) was defeated by Roz Peterson (R) in the general election. Morgan won by a margin of 0.80 percent in 2012.

Previously mildly competitive, now uncontested

  • District 25A: Incumbent Duane Quam (R) ran unopposed in the general election. Quam won by a margin of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 29B: Incumbent Marion O'Neill (R) ran unopposed in the general election. O'Neill won by a margin of 8 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of five incumbents faced primary competition on August 12. Fifteen incumbents did not seek re-election and another 114 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. Incumbents facing opposition included:

Retiring incumbents

Fifteen incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 119 of the current 134 incumbents (88.8%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, five Democrats and 10 Republicans, can be found above.

Context

A Ballotpedia analysis of partisan balance between 1992 and 2013 shows that the House has switched control four times in that period; Republicans were in control from 1999 to 2006 and 2011 to 2012, with Democrats controlling the remainder. By comparison, the state Senate was entirely the realm of Democrats, save for the 2011-2012 session. Heading into the general election, Minnesota was a state government trifecta for the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party.

As all Senate seats are up for election every four years and were last up in 2012, the House elections were the only state legislative elections held in Minnesota in 2014. Gov. Mark Dayton (DFL) was also up for re-election. Nine Republicans and two Democrats were unopposed in the general election. Of those, eight Republican incumbents and one DFL incumbent did not face primary opposition.[4]

The overall mood for the midterm elections appeared to be pessimistic for Democrats despite capitalizing on progressive issues such as same-sex marriage, medical marijuana and setting up a state health insurance exchange since regaining control in the 2012 election. Conversely, Republicans used those issues against the DFL, particularly same-sex marriage and the troubled rollout of the MNsure exchange, for which a number of Minnesotans experienced problems signing up by phone and online. Rep. Melissa Hortman (DFL) told MinnPost that most people are unaware of the legislature's activities, hence the trend of low turnout of Democratic-Farmer-Labor voters will continue in 2014.[5][6][7]

Outside groups put millions into Minnesota elections. The ­liberal Alliance for a Better Minnesota and the conservative Republican-Freedom Club together spent more than $3.5 million in the gubernatorial and State House races. Along with these groups, unions and business groups had a stake in the race.

Races to Watch

The following table details key races in the November 4 general election for the Minnesota House of Representatives and the 2012 margin of victory for the district.

2014 Races to Watch, Minnesota House of Representatives
District Candidate 1 Candidate 2 Margin of Victory (2012)
District 2B David Sobieski (DFL) Steve Green (R) R+2%
District 8B Jay Sieling (DFL) Mary Franson (R) R+0.05%
District 10B Joe Radinovich (DFL) Dale Lueck (R) D+1%
District 11B Tim Faust (DFL) Jason Rarick (R) D+3%
District 14B Zach Dorholt (DFL) Jim Knoblach (R) D+13%
District 17B Mary Sawatzky (DFL) David Baker (R) D+4%
District 27A Shannon Savick (DFL) Peggy Bennett (R) D+3%
District 32B Laurie Warner (DFL) Bob Barrett (R) R+2%
District 48A Yvonne Selcer (DFL) Kirk Stensrud (R) D+0.82%
District 49B Paul Rosenthal (DFL) Barb Sutter (R) D+7%
District 56B Will Morgan (DFL) Roz Peterson (R) D+0.80%
Bold=Incumbent
  • District 2B: Republican incumbent Steve Green held onto his seat by 2 percent in 2012.[8] His opponent, David Sobieski, is a business owner who fashioned himself as a moderate "blue dog" Democrat, making the race somewhat of a tossup.[6] The Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee put the race on its watch list of 69 state House races nationwide.[9] Green managed to successfully hold onto the seat.
  • District 8B: This district featured the slimmest margin of any Minnesota House race in 2012, with incumbent Mary Franson (R) winning by eleven votes, or five hundredths of a percent.[8] The election night count showed Franson winning by just one vote, and matters were complicated by the discovery of a precinct error that led to the discarding of 35 ballots, 32 of which were given to voters who lived in District 12B.[10] Franson defeated newcomer Jay Sieling in the general election. While the district was considered conservative, Franson's viral comments in 2012, namely her analogy of distributing food stamps to feeding wild animals in national parks and calling Earth Day "a Pagan holiday," were largely credited with the airtight election result.[11][12][13] Franson stayed relatively low-key in 2014, but by the week before the election, Sieling had outraised her by nearly double, $11,000 to $6,000. Shawn Olson, Sieling's co-campaign manager, suggested that full-page attack ads on Sieling late in the campaign were a sign that polling "scared [the Republicans'] socks off."[11]
  • District 10B: Incumbent Joe Radinovich (DFL) squeezed by to win his first term in 2012 by 323 votes, a 1 percent margin.[8] He faced another close call when the state Supreme Court squelched a recall movement related to his support of same-sex marriage; nearly 63 percent of voters in the district supported a constitutional amendment that would have banned it.[14] The issue has reappeared in the 2014 campaign, which pit Radinovich against Dale Lueck (R), with Lueck winning the seat.[6][15]
  • District 11B: Incumbent Tim Faust (DFL) was no stranger to defeat, having lost his seat in 2010 after two terms. He regained the seat in 2012 by a 3 point margin.[8]. Lutheran minister Jason Rarick (R) defeated Faust in the general election.[8]
  • District 14B: As part of their efforts to pick up seats in the vicinity of the Twin Cities, Republicans put forward Jim Knoblach, who previously served in the House from 1995 to 2007, to face incumbent Zach Dorholt (DFL). Knoblach was praised by House Minority Leader Kurt Daudt as "a very strong candidate" with "a lot of experience."[16] Knoblach went on to defeat Dorholt by six-tenths of a percent, narrowly avoiding the 0.5 percent threshold needed to trigger an automatic recount, and was named as the chair of the House Ways and Means Committee, which he headed for the final three years of his previous tenure.Cite error: Closing </ref> missing for <ref> tag
  • District 17B: The district held by Mary Sawatzky (DFL) changed hands in both of the prior two elections, and her 2012 victory came at a 4 percent margin; at $85,871, the district was seventh of all Minnesota House districts in campaign contributions that year.[8] Republicans, who put forward David Baker, attacked Sawatzky over her support of MNsure and $2 billion in tax hikes during her current term.[6] Baker defeated Sawatzky in the general election.
  • District 27A: This swing district had the added twist of a third-party candidate. Incumbent Shannon Savick (DFL) defeated her predecessor, Rich Murray (R), by about 3 percent, with Independence Party candidate William Wagner pulling about eight percent.[8] A similar lineup faced off in the general election, with Savick being challenged by Peggy Bennett (R) and Thomas Price (IPM).[6] Bennet defeated her two general election opponents.
  • District 32B: Incumbent Bob Barrett (R) won his second term by 2 points in 2012.[8] Barrett was the subject of a residency controversy when a voter filed a petition challenging the incumbent over his claim of homestead status on a house outside of the district. Barrett countered that he claimed homestead status on his old residence in Shafer, which he was trying to sell, for reasons of property tax, and moved out of the house after redistricting in 2012. The petition was withdrawn after a district court judge ruled that there was insufficient evidence to disqualify Barrett.[17] Barrett defeated his opponent, Laurie Warner (R), in the general election.
  • District 48A: The district covering Eden Prairie and Minnetonka featured a rematch between incumbent Yvonne Selcer (DFL) and her predecessor, Kirk Stensrud (R). Selcer's last victory was the second-tightest in the 2012 Minnesota House elections at 0.82 percent. That race saw $85,474 in campaign contributions, the eighth-most of Minnesota House contests that year.[8] Selcer pulled through again, defeating Stensrud in the general election.
  • District 49B: Both candidates in District 49B have worked with money: incumbent Paul Rosenthal (DFL) is a currency trader and Barb Sutter previously worked as a tax accountant. Sutter's background may have worked in her favor as she focused on the state's financial situation, particularly with MNsure. Rosenthal served one term before losing the seat in 2010 and winning it back by 7 percent two years later; the race saw $86,345 in campaign contributions, the sixth-highest for Minnesota House districts that election cycle.[6][8] Rosenthal defeated Suttter in the general election.
  • District 56B: The tightest race in 2012 saw Will Morgan (DFL) defeat Roz Peterson (R) by 0.80 percent to take the open seat in District 56B, which includes the suburbs of Burnsville and Lakeville, where Interstate 35 splits into western and eastern forks that lead into Minneapolis and St. Paul, respectively. The two faced off again in 2014; both have experience in education, with Morgan working as a physics teacher and Peterson serving on the Lakeville School Board.[18][19][6] Peterson defeated Morgan in the general election.

Missouri House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Missouri House of Representatives:

Missouri House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 52 44
     Republican Party 109 118
     Vacancy 2 0
Total 163 163

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 77 (47.2%) of the 163 districts up for election, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 23 Democrats and 54 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 86 (52.8%) of the 163 districts up for election. Fifteen of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Five other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive:

  • District 17: Mark Ellebracht (D) was defeated by Nick King (R) in the general election. Outgoing incumbent Myron Neth (R) won by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 20: Incumbent John Mayfield was defeated by Bill Kidd (R) in the general election. Mayfield won by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 40: Incumbent Jim Hansen (R) defeated Lowell Jackson in the general election. Hansen won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 44: Incumbent Caleb Rowden (R) defeated Tom Pauley (D) in the general election. Rowden won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 47: Incumbent John Wright (D) was defeated by Chuck Basye (R) in the general election. Wright won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 51: Incumbent Dean Dohrman (R) defeated Gary Grigsby (D) and Bill Wayne (L) in the general election. Dohrman won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 64: Incumbent Robert Cornejo (R) defeated Laura Castaneda (D) in the general election. Cornejo won by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 70: Incumbent Bill Otto (D) defeated Joe Corica (R) in the general election. Otto won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 90: Deb Lavender (D) defeated Gina Jaksetic (R) in the general election. Outgoing incumbent Rick Stream (R) won by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 94: Incumbent Vicki Englund (D) was defeated by Cloria Brown (R) in the general election. Englund won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 97: Incumbent John McCaherty (R) defeated Tom Dohack (D) in the general election. McCaherty won by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 111: Incumbent Michael Frame (D) was defeated by Shane Roden (R) in the general election. Frame won by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 114: Incumbent T.J. McKenna (D) was defeated by Becky Ruth (R) in the general election. McKenna won by a margin of victory of 0.54 percent in 2012.
  • District 115: Incumbent Elaine Gannon (R) defeated Dan Darian (D) and Jerry Dollar, Jr. (L) in the general election. Gannon won by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 150: Walter Dearing (D) was defeated by Andrew McDaniel (R) in the general election. Outgoing incumbent Kent Hampton (R) won by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 18 incumbents faced primary competition on June 3. Twenty-five incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 118 (73.8%) of the 160 incumbents as of August 5 advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives facing primary competition included:

Primary challenges, now unopposed

  • District 15: Incumbent Jon Carpenter was challenged by Jason Buckley in the Democratic primary before the latter's withdrawal. No Republicans filed to run.

Retiring incumbents

Twenty-five incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 138 (84.7%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, seven Democrats and 18 Republicans, can be found above.

Montana House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Montana House of Representatives:

Montana House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 39 41
     Republican Party 61 59
Total 100 100

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 18 of the 100 districts up for election in 2014, one major party candidate ran unopposed in the general election. A total of 17 Democrats and one Republican were guaranteed election in November barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 82 of the 100 districts up for election.

Primary challenges

A total of 16 incumbents faced primary competition on June 3. Thirty incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 54 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. One of the 30 incumbents withdrew following the primary.

Retiring incumbents

Thirty incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 70 incumbents (70.0%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, 12 Democrats and 18 Republicans, can be found above.

Nevada State Assembly elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state houses

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Nevada State Assembly, but Republicans took over control short of a total reversal:

Nevada House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 26 15
     Republican Party 15 27
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 42 42

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 15 (35.7%) of the 42 Assembly seats up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 8 Democrats and 7 Republicans were guaranteed election in November barring unforeseen circumstances. In two races, two candidates from the same party faced off in the general election.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 27 (64.3%) of the 42 districts up for election. Five of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from zero to five percent. Four other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of five to ten percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 21: Incumbent Andy Eisen (D) was defeated by Derek Armstrong (R) in the general election; Adam-John Sanacore (L) finished third. Eisen won by a margin of victory of three points in 2012.
  • District 29: Incumbent Lesley Cohen defeated Daniel Mathis in the Democratic primary, while Stephen Silberkraus was victorious in the Republican primary. Cohen was defeated by Silberkraus in the general election. Cohen's predecessor, April Mastroluca (D), won by a margin of victory of five points in 2012.
  • District 31: Incumbent Skip Daly (D) was defeated by Jill Dickman (R) in the general election. Daly won by a margin of victory of four points in 2012.
  • District 35: Incumbent James Healey (D) defeated Charles Clark, Jr. in the Democratic primary, while Brent Jones won in the Republican primary. Healey was defeated by Jones in the general election. Healey won by a margin of victory of five points in 2012.
  • District 37: Incumbent Wesley Duncan (R) defeated Gerald Mackin (D) and Lou Pombo (L) in the general election. Duncan won by a margin of victory of two points in 2012.

Mildly Competitive

Primary challenges

A total of 11 incumbents faced primary competition on June 10. Nine Assembly seats were open, leaving 22 incumbents that advanced past the primary without opposition. The state assembly members that faced primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Eight incumbent assembly members did not run for re-election, while 32 (78%) of the then 41 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, five Democrats and three Republicans, can be found above. In addition, District 3 incumbent Peggy Pierce (D) passed away in October 2013, leaving the seat vacant until the swearing-in of general election winner Nelson Araujo (D).

New Hampshire House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the New Hampshire House of Representatives:

New Hampshire House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 213 160
     Republican Party 173 239
     Independent 0 1
     Vacancy 14 0
Total 400 400
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 83 (20.75%) of the 400 seats up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 39 Democrats and 44 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

In multiple member districts, Ballotpedia staff used the official candidate list and the seats available in the district to determine the number of major party candidates. For example, in Rockingham 4, five seats were available, and two Democrats and nine Republicans ran in the district. Since only two Democrats ran for election, Republicans were guaranteed at least three seats in that district.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 317 (79.2%) of the 400 seats up for election. Eighty-seven of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Twenty-nine other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Margin of victory is measured in multiple member districts as the difference between the lowest vote winner and the top vote loser of the opposite party.

Primary challenges

A total of 94 incumbents faced primary competition on September 9. Ninety-three incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 199 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition.

Retiring incumbents

Ninety-three incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 293 (73.2%) of the current 400 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, 53 Democrats and 40 Republicans, can be found above. There were 14 vacancies in the House heading into the elections.

New Mexico House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state houses

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the New Mexico House of Representatives:

New Mexico House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 37 33
     Republican Party 33 37
Total 70 70

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 38 (54.2%) of the 70 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 23 Democrats and 15 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 32 (46%) of the 70 districts up for election. Nine of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Six other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 7: Incumbent Kelly K. Fajardo was unopposed in the Republican primary. Teresa K.E. Smith De Cherif defeated Andrew Barreras in the Democratic primary. Fajardo defeated Smith De Cherif in the general election. Fajardo won the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 15: Incumbent Emily A. Kane (D) was defeated by Sarah Maestas Barnes (R) in the general election. Kane won the general election by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 23: Incumbent Paul Pacheco (R) defeated Catherine Begaye (D) in the general election. Pacheco won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.57 percent in 2012.
  • District 24: Incumbent Elizabeth L. Thomson (D) was defeated by Conrad James (R) in the general election. Thomson won the general election by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 29: Incumbent Thomas Anderson was defeated by David Edward Adkins in the Republican primary. Adkins defeated Ronnie Martinez (D) in the general election. Anderson won the general election by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 36: Incumbent Phillip M. Archuleta (D) was defeated by Andrew Nunez (R) in the general election. Archuleta won the general election by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 37: Incumbent Terry McMillan (R) defeated Joanne J. Ferrary (D) in the general election. McMillan won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.1 percent in 2012.
  • District 39: Incumbent Rodolpho Martinez (D) was defeated by John L. Zimmerman (R) in the general election. Martinez won the general election by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 43: Incumbent Stephanie Richard (D) defeated Geoff Rodgers (R) in the general election. Richard won the general election by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

  • District 8: Incumbent Alonzo Baldonado (R) defeated Frank A. Otero (D) in the general election. Baldonado won the general election by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.
  • District 30: Incumbent Nathaniel Gentry (R) defeated Robert M. Coffey (D) in the general election. Gentry won the general election by a margin of victory of 8 percent in 2012.
  • District 38: Incumbent Dianne Hamilton (R) defeated Terry Fortenberry (D) in the general election. Hamilton won the general election by a margin of victory of 10 percent in 2012.
  • District 53: Ricky Little (R) defeated Mariaelena Johnson (D) in the general election. Incumbent Nathan Cote (D) won the general election by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.
  • District 57: Incumbent Jason Harper (R) defeated Donna I. Tillman (D) in the general election. Harper won the general election by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.

Previously mildly competitive, now unopposed

  • District 68: Incumbent Monica Youngblood (R) ran unchallenged in the primary and general elections. She won the seat after defeating Eloise Gift (D) by a margin of 10 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of seven incumbents faced primary competition on June 3. Eleven incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 52 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives who faced primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Eleven incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 59 (84.2%) of the current 70 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, five Republicans and six Democrats, can be found above.

New York State Assembly elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the New York State Assembly:

New York House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 99 106
     Republican Party 40 44
     Vacancy 11 0
Total 150 150
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 61 (40.6%) of the 150 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 40 Democrats and 14 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 89 (59.3%) of the 150 districts up for election. Four of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from zero to five percent. Six other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of five to ten percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 3: Incumbent Edward Hennessey (D) was defeated by Dean Murray (R) in the general election. Hennessey won the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 107: Incumbent Steven McLaughlin (R) defeated Philip J. Malone (D) in the general election. McLaughlin won the general election by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.

Previously competitive, now unopposed

  • District 135: Incumbent Mark Johns defeated Calvin A. Frelier in the Republican primary. Johns ran unchallenged in the general election. He won the general election by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 145: Incumbent John Ceretto (R) ran unopposed in both the Republican primary and general election. He won the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.

Mildly Competitive

  • District 21: Incumbent Brian Curran (R) defeated Adam Shapiro (D) in the general election. Curran won the general election by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 94: Incumbent Steve Katz (R) defeated Andrew I. Falk (D) in the general election. Katz won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 106: Incumbent Didi Barrett (D) defeated Michael N. Kelsey in the general election. Barrett won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 146: Incumbent Raymond Walter was unopposed in the Republican primary, and defeated Steven G. Meyer in the general election. Walter won the general election by a margin of victory of 8 percent in 2012.

Previously mildly competitive, now unopposed

  • District 93: Incumbent David Buchwald (D) ran unopposed in both the Democratic primary and general election. He won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 14 incumbents faced primary competition on September 9. Five incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 120 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives that faced primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Five incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 134 (96.4%) of the current 139 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, five Democrats, can be found above. There were 11 vacancies in the New York State Assembly heading into the elections.

North Carolina House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state houses

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the North Carolina House of Representatives:

North Carolina House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 43 46
     Republican Party 77 74
Total 120 120

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 61 (51%) of the 120 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 34 Republicans and 27 Democrats were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 59 (49.1%) of the 120 districts up for election. Nine of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from zero to five percent. Six other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of five to ten percent. Those districts were:

2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Competitive

  • District 6: Incumbent Paul Tine was unopposed in the Democratic primary. Mattie Lawson defeated Ashley Woolard in the Republican primary and was defeated by Tine in the general election. Tine won the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 9: Incumbent Brian Brown defeated Ashley Bleau in the Republican primary. Brown went on to defeat Uriah Ward (D) in the general election. Brown won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 35: Incumbent Chris Malone (R) defeated Brian Mountcastle (D) in the general election. Malone won the general election by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 41: Incumbent Thomas Murry (R) was defeated by Gale Adcock (D) in the general election. Murry won the general election by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 51: Incumbent Michael Stone (R) was defeated by Brad Salmon (D) in the general election. Stone won the general election by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 92: Incumbent Charles Jeter (R) defeated Robin Bradford (D) in the general election. Jeter won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 93: Incumbent Jonathan Jordan (R) defeated Sue Counts (D) in the general election. Jordan won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 118: Incumbent Michele Presnell (R) defeated Dean Hicks (D) in the general election. Presnell won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 119: Incumbent Joe Sam Queen (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary. Mike Clampitt defeated Dodie Allen and Aaron Littlefield in the Republican primary and was defeated by Queen in the general election. Queen won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 19 incumbents faced primary competition on May 6. Nine incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 92 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. Three incumbents, one Democrat and two Republicans, were defeated by primary opponents. The state representatives who faced primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Nine incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 111 (92.5%) of the current 120 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, five Republicans and four Democrats, can be found above.

North Dakota House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the North Dakota House of Representatives:

North Dakota House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 23 23
     Republican Party 70 71
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 94 94

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 16 (63%) of the 48 seats up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 12 Republicans and four Democrats were guaranteed election in November barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 32 (66.6%) of the 48 seats up for election.

Primary challenges

A total of four incumbents faced primary competition on June 10. Ten incumbents did not run for re-election in 2014 and another 34 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives that faced primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Ten incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 38 (79%) of the current 48 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, three Democrats and seven Republicans, can be found above.

Ohio House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state houses

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Ohio House of Representatives:

Ohio House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 38 34
     Republican Party 60 65
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 99 99

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 18 (18.1%) of the 99 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 12 Republicans and 6 Democrats were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 81 (81.8%) of the 99 districts up for election. Seven of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from zero to five percent. Ten other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of five to ten percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 5: Incumbent Nick Barborak (D) was defeated by Tim Ginter (R) in the general election. Barborak the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 21: Incumbent Mike Duffey (R) defeated Dawn Valasco (D) and Will Johnsen (G) in the general election. Duffey won the general election by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 24: Incumbent Stephanie Kunze defeated Pat Manley in the Republican primary. Kunze faced Kathy Hoff (D) and Mark Noble (L) in the general election. Kunze won the general election by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 36: Incumbent Anthony DeVitis (R) defeated Paula Prentice (D) in the general election. DeVitis won the general election by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 92: Incumbent Gary Scherer defeated Kirk Stinson in the Republican primary. Scherer was unopposed in the general election. Scherer won the general election by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 98: Incumbent Al Landis (R) defeated Jeremiah Johnson (D) in the general election. Landis won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.03 percent in 2012.

Competitive, but now unopposed

  • District 7: Incumbent Mike Dovilla (R) was set to face Matt Patten (D) in the general election, but Patten withdrew. Dovilla won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.2 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 18 incumbents faced primary competition on May 6. Twenty-three incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 58 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives that faced primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Twenty-three incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 76 (76.7%) of the current 99 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, twelve Democrats and eleven Republicans, can be found above. One incumbent, Terry Blair (R) ran for re-election, but died on June 26, 2014.

Oklahoma House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Oklahoma House of Representatives:

Oklahoma House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 29 29
     Republican Party 72 72
Total 101 101

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 66 (65.3%) of the 101 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 48 Republicans and 18 Democrats were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 35 (35%) of the 101 districts up for election. Three of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from zero to five percent. Four other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of five to ten percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 22: Incumbent Charles McCall was unopposed in both the Republican primary and general election. McCall won the general election by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 45: Incumbent Aaron Stiles (R) was defeated by Claudia Griffith (D) in the general election. Stiles won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.1 percent in 2012.
  • District 56: Incumbent David Perryman (D) defeated Chuck Utsler (R) in the general election. Perryman won the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

  • District 2: Incumbent John R. Bennett was unopposed in the Republican primary and general election. Bennett won the general election by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 12: Incumbent Wade Rousselot (D) defeated David Tackett (R) in the general election. Rousselot won the general election by a margin of victory of 8 percent in 2012.
  • District 14: George Faught (R) defeated Jack A. Reavis (D) in the general election. Incumbent Arthur Hulbert (R) won the general election by a margin of victory of 10 percent in 2012.
  • District 71: Incumbent Katie Henke (R) was unopposed in the Republican primary. Henke won the general election by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 11 incumbents faced primary competition on June 24. Twenty-one incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 69 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives that faced primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Twenty-one incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 80 (79.2%) of the current 101 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, fifteen Republicans and six Democrats, can be found above.

Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Oregon House of Representatives:

Oregon House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 34 35
     Republican Party 26 25
Total 60 60
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 22 (36.6%) of the 60 seats up for election, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 13 Democrats and nine Republicans were guaranteed election in November barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 38 (63.3%) of the 60 districts up for election. Four of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Five other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent. There were 138 districts where only one major party candidate appeared on the general election ballot.[20]

The districts with elections in 2014 which held competitive or mildly competitive elections in 2012 were:

Competitive

Mildly competitive

Previously mildly competitive, now unopposed

  • District 49: Democratic incumbent Chris Gorsek (D) was unchallenged in the primary and general elections. He won the seat after defeating incumbent Matthew Wand (R) by a margin of 9 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of five incumbents faced primary competition on May 20. Fifteen incumbents did not run for re-election in 2014 and another 40 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives who faced primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Fifteen incumbent representatives, six Democrats and nine Republicans, did not run for re-election, while 45 (75.0%) of the current 60 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, can be found above.

Pennsylvania House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives:

Pennsylvania House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 91 84
     Republican Party 111 119
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 203 203
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 117 (57.6%) of the 203 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. Fifty-nine Republicans and 58 Democrats were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 86 (42.3%) of the 203 districts up for election. Six of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from 0 to 5 percent. Nine other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 to 10 percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 39: Incumbent Rick Saccone (R) defeated Lisa Stout-Bashioum (D) in the general election. Saccone won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.4 percent in 2012.
  • District 131: Incumbent Justin Simmons defeated Michael William Beyer (D) in the general election. Simmons won the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 146: Incumbent Mark Painter was defeated by Thomas Quigley (R) in the general election. Painter won the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 156: Incumbent Dan Truitt (R) defeated Sandra Snyder (D) in the general election. Truitt won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 157: Incumbent Warren Kampf (R) defeated Marian Moskowitz (D) in the general election. Kampf won the general election by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 161: Incumbent Joe Hackett (R) defeated Leanne Krueger-Braneky (D) in the general election. Hackett won the general election by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 163: James Santora (R) defeated Vincent Rongione (D) in the general election. Incumbent Nicholas Micozzie (R) won the general election by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

  • District 13: Incumbent John Lawrence (R) defeated Ann V.S. Schott in the general election. Lawrence won the general election by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 25: Incumbent Joseph Markosek (D) defeated John Ritter (R) in the general election. Markosek won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 49: Incumbent Peter Daley, III defeated Donald Cook (R) in the general election. Daley won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 104: Incumbent Susan Helm (R) defeated Eugene Stilp (D) in the general election. Helm won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 150: Incumbent Mike Vereb (R) defeated David Craig McKenzie III (D) in the general election. Vereb won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.

Previously mildly competitive, now unopposed

  • District 10: Incumbent Jaret Gibbons (D) ran unchallenged in the primary and general elections. Gibbons won the general election by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.
  • District 79: Incumbent John McGinnis (R) ran unchallenged in the primary and general elections. McGinnis won the general election by a margin of victory of 10 percent in 2012.
  • District 109: Incumbent David Millard (R) ran unchallenged in the primary and general elections. Millard won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 155: Incumbent Becky Corbin (R) ran unchallenged in the primary and general elections. Corbin won the general election by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

Thirty-nine incumbents faced primary competition on May 20. Eighteen incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 146 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives who faced primary competition included:

Retiring incumbents

Eighteen incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 185 (91.1%) of the 203 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, 13 Republicans and five Democrats, can be found above.

Rhode Island House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Rhode Island House of Representatives:

Rhode Island House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 69 63
     Republican Party 6 11
     Independent 0 1
Total 75 75
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 54 (72%) of the 75 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 52 Democrats and 2 Republican were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 21 (28%) of the 75 districts up for election. Three of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from zero to five percent. Seven other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory of five to ten percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 26: Incumbent Patricia Morgan (R) defeated Nicholas Denice (D) and Paul Caianiello, Jr. (I) in the general election. Morgan defeated Denice in the general election by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 30: Incumbent Antonio Giarrusso (R) ran unchallenged in the general election. Giarrusso won the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 72: Incumbent Linda Dill Finn (D) was defeated by Daniel Reilly (R) in the general election. Dill Finn defeated Reilly in the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

  • District 31: Incumbent Doreen Costa (R) defeated Julie Casimiro (D) in the general election. Costa won the general election by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.
  • District 32: Incumbent Robert Craven (D) defeated Sharon Gamba (R) in the general election. Craven won the general election by a margin of victory of 8 percent in 2012.
  • District 35: Incumbent Spencer Dickinson was defeated by Kathleen Fogarty in the Democratic primary. Fogarty defeated Lacey McGreevy (R) in the general election. Dickinson won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 39: Incumbent Larry Valencia was unopposed in the Democratic primary. Valencia was defeated by Justin Price in the general election. Valencia won the general election by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 46: Incumbent Jeremiah O'Grady defeated John J. Cullen in the Democratic primary. O'Grady went on to defeat Matthew Guerra in the general election. He defeated Guerra in the general election by a margin of victory of 6 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive, now unopposed

  • District 47: Incumbent Cale Keable ran unopposed in the Democratic primary and general election. Keable won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 67: Incumbent Jan Malik ran unopposed in the Democratic primary and general election. Malik won the general election by a margin of victory of 10 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 11 incumbents faced primary competition on September 9. Six incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 58 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives that faced primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Six incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 69 (92%) of the current 75 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, five Democrats, can be found above.

South Carolina House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the South Carolina House of Representatives:

South Carolina House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 46 46
     Republican Party 78 77
     Vacant 0 1
Total 124 124
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 93 (75%) of the 124 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 62 Republicans and 31 Democrats were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 31 (25%) of the 124 districts up for election.

Competitive

  • District 53: Amy Brown defeated Anthony Waymyers in the Democratic primary, while Richie Yow ran unopposed in the Republican primary. Brown was defeated by Yow in the general election. Ted Vick (D) won the general election by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 75: Incumbent Kirkman Finlay, III (R) faced Joe McCulloch (D) in the general election. Finlay won the general election by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 20 incumbents faced primary competition on June 10. Ten incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 94 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives that faced primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Eleven incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 113 (91.1%) of the current 124 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, five Democrats and six Republicans, can be found above.

South Dakota House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the South Dakota House of Representatives:

South Dakota House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 17 12
     Republican Party 53 58
Total 70 70
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 37 (52.9%) of the 70 seats up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election, or a major party was virtually guaranteed a seat when two candidates from the same major party faced one candidate from the other major party and/or any independent or third-party candidates in a dual-member district. A total of 10 Democrats and 27 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 30 (42.8%) of the 70 seats up for election.

Primary challenges

A total of fifteen incumbents faced primary competition on June 3. Twenty-three incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 32 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The state representatives that faced primary competition included:

Tennessee House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state houses

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Tennessee House of Representatives:

Tennessee House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 27 26
     Republican Party 71 73
     Carter County Republican 1 0
Total 99 99
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 59 (59.6%) of the 99 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 15 Democrats and 44 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 40 (40.4%) of the 99 districts up for election.

Competitive

  • District 13: Incumbent Gloria Johnson (D) was defeated by Eddie Smith (R) in the general election. Johnson won the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 33: Incumbent John Ragan defeated Caitlin Nolan in the Republican primary and was unchallenged in the general election. Ragan won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 43: Kevin Dunlap defeated Kristopher Gore and James Thomas Jacobs in the Democratic primary. He defeated Robert F. Dunham (R) and Edward Buck (I) in the general election. Incumbent Paul Bailey (R) won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 50: Incumbent Bo Mitchell (D) defeated Troy Brewer (R) in the general election. Mitchell won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.6 percent in 2012.
  • District 60: Incumbent Darren Jernigan (D) defeated Jim Gotto (R) in the general election. Jernigan won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.4 percent in 2012.
  • District 74: Incumbent John Tidwell (D) was defeated by Jay Reedy (R) in the general election. Tidwell won the general election by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 21 incumbents faced primary competition on August 7. Nine incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 70 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The representatives that faced primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Nine incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 90 (90.9%) of the current 99 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, one Democrat and eight Republicans, can be found above.

Texas House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held a commanding majority in the Texas House of Representatives. The Republican Party has been the dominant party in the Texas State House since the November 2002 elections, when they ended a Democratic Party majority that had been uninterrupted for the previous nine decades.

Texas House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 55 52
     Republican Party 94 98
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 150 150

Note: On November 6, 2014, Villarreal informed Governor Rick Perry that he would be not accepting the seat in the Texas House of Representatives, and would be resigning his seat effective the end of his term, January 15, 2015. A special election will be necessary to fill Villarreal's seat, which could take place as early as December, 2014.[21][22]

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 105 of the 150 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 45 Democrats and 60 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 45 of the 150 districts up for election. Three of those seats held competitive elections in 2012 with a margin of victory ranging from zero to five percent. Four other elections were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory from six to ten percent. Those districts were:

Competitive

  • District 43: Incumbent J.M. Lozano (R) defeated Kim Gonzalez (D) in the general election. Lozano won the general election by a margin of victory of three percent in 2012.
  • District 105: Incumbent Linda Harper-Brown was defeated in the Republican primary by challenger Rodney Anderson, who went on to win in the general election. Harper-Brown won by a margin of victory of two percent in 2012.
  • District 107: Incumbent Kenneth Sheets (R) defeated Carol Donovan (D) in the general election. Sheets won by a margin of victory of two percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

  • District 23: Susan Criss (D) was defeated by Wayne Faircloth (R) in the general election for the open seat of the retiring Craig Eiland (D). Faircloth defeated Robert Senter in the primary. Eiland won by a margin of victory of eight percent in 2012.
  • District 117: Incumbent Philip Cortez (D) was defeated by Rick Galindo (R) in the general election. Cortez won by a margin of victory of eight percent in 2012.
  • District 134: Incumbent Sarah Davis (R) easily defeated Bonnie Parker in the Republican primary, and dispatched Alison Ruff (D) in the general election. Davis won by a margin of victory of nine percent in 2012.
  • District 144: Incumbent Mary Ann Perez (D) was defeated by challenger Gilbert Pena (R) in the general election. Perez won by a margin of victory of seven percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

Thirty-three incumbents faced primary competition on March 4. Twelve incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014. A total of 105 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition.

Republican incumbents who were defeated in their party primary on March 4:

Republican incumbents who were defeated in a May 27 runoff as a result of the March 4 primary:

Democratic incumbents who were defeated in their party primary on March 4:

Retiring incumbents

Twelve incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 137 (91.3%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, eleven Republicans and one Democrat, can be found above.

Utah House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Utah House of Representatives:

Utah House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 14 13
     Republican Party 61 62
Total 75 75
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 15 (20.0%) of the 75 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 13 Republicans and two Democrats were guaranteed election in November barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 60 (80.0%) of the 75 districts up for election.

Competitive

  • District 30: Michael D. Lee (D) defeated Fred Cox (R) in the general election. Incumbent Janice Fisher (D) won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 31: Incumbent Larry Wiley (D) defeated Sophia DiCaro (R) in the general election. Wiley won the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 37: Incumbent Carol Moss (D) defeated Ron Hilton (R) in the general election. Moss won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 69: Incumbent Jerry Anderson was defeated by Bill Labrum in the Republican convention. Brad King (D) defeated Labrum in the general election, flipping the seat. Anderson won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.

Convention challenges

A total of 13 incumbents faced convention competition for their party's nomination. Two incumbents faced competition in the August 24 primary elections. Ten incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 50 incumbents advanced past the convention without opposition. The representatives that faced convention competition were:

Primary challenges

The representatives that faced primary competition are:

Retiring incumbents

Ten incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 64 (85.3%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, four Democrats and six Republicans, can be found above.

Vermont House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Vermont House of Representatives:

Vermont House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 96 84
     Republican Party 45 55
     Vermont Progressive Party 5 5
     Independent 4 6
Total 150 150
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

There were 150 seats in 104 districts up for election in 2014. For 102 seats (80 districts) of 150, there was only one major party candidate. Thirty Republicans and sixty-nine Democrats were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Candidates from both major parties faced off in the general election in for 48 seats (38 districts) up for election.

Seventeen of Vermont's House districts held competitive elections in 2012, with their last seats claimed by a margin of victory less than 5 percent. Eleven other districts held moderately competitive elections in 2012, with their last seats claimed by a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

Competitive

Primary challenges

A total of six incumbents faced primary competition on August 24. Twenty-three incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 121 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition.

Retiring incumbents

Twenty-three incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 127 (84.7%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents can be found above.

Washington House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the Washington House of Representatives:

Washington House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 54 50
     Republican Party 43 47
     Vacancy 1 1 (*)
Total 98 98
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Note: (*) Incumbent Roger Freeman (D) died six days before the general election. His name stayed on the ballot and was elected posthumously. Democratic precinct officers chose Carol Gregory, Richard Champion and Shari Song as the top three replacement candidates in a meeting on December 1, 2014. The King County and Pierce County councils will choose one of the three to serve for one year at a later date. Voters will then elect someone to serve the last year of the two-year term.[24][25]

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 39 (39.8%) of the 98 seats up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 18 Democrats and 21 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 59 (60.2%) of the 98 districts up for election.

The Libertarian Party has fielded 12 candidates for the state legislature.

Competitive

  • District 2b: Incumbent J.T. Wilcox (R) defeated Steven Nielson (L) in a district that is heavily Libertarian-leaning. This is Wilcox's first challenge from outside his own party.
  • District 10b: Incumbent Dave Hayes (R) defeated Nick Petrish (D) in the general election. Hayes and Petrish defeated Brien Lillquist (R) and David Sponheim (D) in the primary. Hayes won the general election by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 17a: Incumbent Monica Stonier (D) was defeated by Lynda Wilson (R) in the general election. Stonier won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.3 percent in 2012.
  • District 17b: Incumbent Paul Harris (R) defeated against Chris Rockhold (L). Rockhold has gained much of Harris' traditional support.
  • District 25a: Dawn Morrell (D) was defeated by Melanie Stambaugh (R) in the general election. Morrell won the general election by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 30a: Incumbent Linda Kochmar (R) defeated Greg Baruso (D) in the general election. Kochmar won the general election by a margin of victory of 1 percent in 2012.
  • District 35a: Incumbent Kathy Haigh (D) was defeated by Dan Griffey in the general election. Haigh and Griffey defeated Josiah Rowell in the primary. Haigh won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 35b: Incumbent Drew MacEwen (R) defeated Tammey Newton (D) in the general election. MacEwen won the general election by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 47a: Incumbent Mark Hargrove (R) defeated Chris Barringer (D) in the general election. Hargrove won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.3 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

  • District 5b: Chad Magendanz (R) defeated David Spring (D) in the general election. Magendanz and Spring defeated Colin Alexander (D) and Ryan Dean Burkett (I) in the primary. Magendanz won the general election by a margin of victory of 10 percent in 2012.
  • District 26b: Incumbent Larry Seaquist (D) was defeated by Michelle Caldier the general election. Seaquist won the general election by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 28a: Incumbent Dick Muri (R) defeated Mary Moss (D) in the general election. Muri won the general election by a margin of victory of 10 percent in 2012.
  • District 30b: Incumbent Roger Freeman (D) defeated Jack Dovey (R) in the general election. Freeman won the general election by a margin of victory of 10 percent in 2012. Freeman died of colon cancer on October 29, 2014, but stayed on the ballot. Since Freeman was elected posthumously, the King County and Pierce County councils chose a Democrat to serve for one year on December 1, 2014.[26][27]
  • District 39b: Incumbent Elizabeth Scott (R) defeated Charles Jensen (D) in the general election. Scott won the general election by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 42b: Incumbent Vincent Buys (R) defeated Joy Monjure (D) in the general election. Buys won the general election by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.
  • District 44a: Incumbent Hans Dunshee (D) defeated Rob Toyer (R) in the general election. Dunshee won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 9 incumbents faced primary competition on August 5. Nine incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 80 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The representatives that faced primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

Nine incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 89 (90.8%) of the current 98 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, four Democrats and five Republicans, can be found above.

West Virginia House of Delegates elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state houses

Heading into the November 4 election, the Democratic Party held the majority in the West Virginia House of Delegates:

West Virginia House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 53 36
     Republican Party 47 64
Total 100 100

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 15 of the 67 districts up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. Seventeen Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Candidates from both major parties faced off in the general election in 85 of the 100 districts up for election. Eighteen of these Districts held competitive elections in 2012, with their last seat claimed by a margin of victory less than 5 percent. Nine other districts held moderately competitive elections in 2012, with their last seat claimed by a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

Primary challenges

A total of 32 incumbents faced primary competition on May 13. Eight incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 60 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. Five incumbents were defeated by their primary opponents.

Retiring incumbents

Eight incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 92 (92.0%) ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, four Democrats and four Republicans, can be found above.

Wisconsin State Assembly elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Wisconsin State Assembly:

Wisconsin House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 38 36
     Republican Party 60 63
     Independent 1 0
Total 99 99
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 33 (33.3%) of the 99 seats up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 23 Democrats and 30 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 66 (66.7%) of the 99 districts up for election.

Competitive

  • District 1: Joel Kitchens (R) defeated Joe Majeski (D) in the general election. Kitchens defeated Paul Feit, Brian Hackbarth and Terry McNulty in the Republican primary. Incumbent Garey Bies (R) won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 26: Terry Katsma (R) defeated Terry Van Akkeren (D) in the general election. Endsley won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 50: Incumbent Ed Brooks (R) defeated Christopher Miller (D) in the general election. Brooks won the general election by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 51: Todd Novak (R) defeated Dick Cates (D) and Adam Laufenberg (L) in the general election. Incumbent Howard Marklein (R) won the general election by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 68: Incumbent Kathy Bernier (R) defeated Jeff Peck (D) in the general election. Bernier won the general election by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 70: Incumbent Amy Vruwink (D) was defeated by Nancy Vander Meer (R) in the general election. Vruwink won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.5 percent in 2012.
  • District 72: Incumbent Scott Krug (R) defeated Dana Duncan in the general election. Duncan defeated Tom Rayome in the Democratic primary. Krug won the general election by a margin of victory of 0.4 percent in 2012.
  • District 75: Incumbent Stephen Smith (D) was defeated by Romaine Quinn (R) in the general election. Smith won the general election by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 85: Incumbent Mandy Wright (D) was defeated by Dave Heaton (R) in the general election. Wright won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.
  • District 88: John Macco (R) defeated Dan Robinson (D) in the general election. Incumbent John Klenke (R) won the general election by a margin of victory of 5 percent in 2012.
  • District 93: Incumbent Warren Petryk (R) defeated Jeff Smith (D) in the general election. Petryk won the general election by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.

Mildly competitive

  • District 37: Incumbent John Jagler (R) defeated Mary Arnold (D) in the general election. Jagler won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 49: Incumbent Travis Tranel (R) defeated Chad Henneman (D) the general election. Tranel won the general election by a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.
  • District 67: Incumbent Tom Larson (R) defeated Gary Stene (D) in the general election. Larson won the general election by a margin of victory of 7 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of three incumbents faced primary competition on August 12. 21 incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 70 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. The representatives that faced primary competition were:

Retiring incumbents

21 incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 78 (78.8%) of the current 99 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, seven Democrats and fourteen Republicans, can be found above.

Wyoming House of Representatives elections, 2014

See also: Partisan composition of state senates

Heading into the November 4 election, the Republican Party held the majority in the Wyoming House of Representatives:

Wyoming House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
     Democratic Party 8 9
     Republican Party 52 51
Total 60 60
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

Candidates unopposed by a major party

In 40 (66.7%) of the 60 seats up for election in 2014, there was only one major party candidate running for election. A total of 4 Democrats and 36 Republicans were guaranteed election barring unforeseen circumstances.

Two major party candidates faced off in the general election in 20 (33.3%) of the 60 districts up for election.

Competitive

  • District 33: Andrea Clifford (D) was defeated by Jim Allen (R) in the general election. Incumbent W. Patrick Goggles won the general election by a margin of victory of 4 percent in 2012.
  • District 45: Charles Pelkey (D) defeated Charles Young (R) in the general election. Incumbent Matt Greene won the general election by a margin of victory of 2 percent in 2012.
  • District 48: Incumbent Mark Baker (R) defeated Joe Barbuto (D) in the general election. Baker won the general election by a margin of victory of 3 percent in 2012.

Primary challenges

A total of 21 incumbents faced primary competition on August 19. Nine incumbents did not seek re-election in 2014 and another 30 incumbents advanced past the primary without opposition. Four incumbents were defeated by primary challengers:

The four victorious challengers face no general election opposition in each of the districts.

Retiring incumbents

Nine incumbent representatives did not run for re-election, while 51 (85.0%) of the current 60 incumbents ran for re-election. A list of those incumbents, one Democrat and eight Republicans, can be found above.


See also

References

  1. hawaiinewsnow.com, "New Hanohano controversy," February 19, 2014
  2. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named tribune
  3. The Ottawa Herald, "House candidate withdraws," September 10, 2014
  4. Ballotpedia, "Minnesota Competitiveness," accessed October 29, 2014
  5. MinnPost, "Legislative victories achieved, DFLers confront cold electoral reality," May 19, 2014
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 MinnPost, "One week out, an updated look at the 20 races that will decide who controls the Minnesota House," October 28, 2014
  7. Star Tribune, "Having trouble with MNsure? Here are some tips for consumers," December 23, 2013
  8. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named mnmov
  9. Minnesota Public Radio, "DC group plays offense in 3 MN House districts," October 8, 2014
  10. Politics in Minnesota, "Franson-Cunniff recount complicated by Douglas Co. balloting error," November 19, 2012
  11. 11.0 11.1 City Pages, "Mary Franson -- Remember Her? -- Involved in Another Tight Race," October 29, 2014
  12. City Pages, "Rep. Mary Franson infuriated by Earth Day, calls it 'Pagan holiday,'" April 19, 2012
  13. City Pages, "Mary Franson, MNGOP Rep., compares food stamp recipients to wild animals," March 5, 2012
  14. Politics in Minnesota, "Supreme Court rejects recall efforts against Radinovich, Ward," May 21, 2013
  15. The Uptake, "VIDEO: In 10B Debate Rep. Radinovich and Lueck Clash On Pipelines, Same-Sex Marriage," October 24, 2014
  16. St. Cloud Times, "With session over, GOP leaders criticize DFL ideas," May 19, 2014
  17. The Post-Review, "Petition withdrawn in Barrett residency issue," August 28, 2014
  18. Legislative Coordinating Commission, District 48A map, November 2012
  19. Legislative Coordinating Commission, District 56B map, November 2012
  20. Ballotpedia.org, "Oregon House Margin of Victory," accessed March 18, 2014
  21. John Reynolds The Texas Tribune, "Villarreal Resigning to Run for San Antonio Mayor," November 10, 2014
  22. Michael Villarreal's Resignation Letter to Governor Rick Perry, November 6, 2014
  23. Texas Secretary of State, "2014 Republican Party Primary Election: State Representative District 115," accessed March 5, 2014 (timed out)
  24. Federal Way Mirror, "Deceased Federal Way state House Rep. Roger Freeman is winning re-election," November 5, 2014
  25. Federal Way Mirror, "30th District Democrats pick top three to replace late Rep. Roger Freeman," December 3, 2014
  26. Komo News, "State House District 30b," accessed November 13, 2014
  27. Federal Way Mirror, "Deceased Federal Way state House Rep. Roger Freeman is winning re-election," accessed November 13, 2014