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Revision as of 14:14, 28 August 2014

2011
SLP badge 2010 election.jpg
2010 State Legislative Elections

Impact for redistrictingPartisan controlCompetitiveness analysisImpact of Term LimitsTea Party study

Star bookmark.png  State Legislative Election Results Star bookmark.png

States
AlabamaAlaskaArizonaArkansasCaliforniaColradoConnecticutDelawareFloridaGeorgiaHawaiiIdahoIllinoisIndianaIowaKansasKentuckyLouisianaMaineMarylandMassachusettsMichiganMinnesotaMississippiMissouriMontanaNebraskaNevadaNew HampshireNew JerseyNew MexicoNew YorkNorth CarolinaNorth DakotaOhioOklahomaOregonPennsylvaniaRhode IslandSouth CarolinaSouth DakotaTennesseeTexasUtahVermontVirginiaWashingtonWest VirginiaWisconsinWyoming
Other 2010 Election information
Primary electionsStatewide elections, 2010State Senate electionsState House elections
In the 50 states, there are 99 state legislative chambers altogether, and 88 of the 99 chambers held state legislative elections on November 2, 2010.

The 11 chambers without elections in 2010 (except for an occasional special election), were the upper houses and lower houses in Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey and Virginia, and the upper house (state senate) in Kansas, New Mexico and South Carolina.

1,167 of the country's 1,971 state senate seats were up for re-election in November, and 4,958 (91.6%) of the country's 5,413 state house seats were up for re-election. Altogether, 6,125 of the country's 7,384 state legislative seats were up for re-election in the volatile election year.

Of the 88 chambers with elections, Democrats were the majority in 52 and Republicans were the majority in 33. All election predictions made by state legislative observers predicted that more chambers would move into the Republican column. (See Projected outcomes of state senate elections and Projected outcomes of state house elections.)

See also: State senate elections and State house elections

These projections turned out to be true, as Republicans picked up more than 660 seats in the November 2 general election.

Impact for redistricting

Analysis in USA Today and the Wall Street Journal says that the U.S. Congressional and state legislative redistricting that will take place after the 2010 census is very much at the front of the mind of national GOP and Democratic strategists when they think about state legislative outcomes.[1] An NPR report noted that if Republicans have a strong showing on November 2, they could have complete control over the drawing of about 150 U.S. House seats.[2] Mike Dean, executive director of Common Cause Minnesota, said that while voters decide who their legislators are, redistricting provides an opportunity for politicians to decide who their voters are.[3]

Nationally, leading into the November 2010 election, Republicans controled the governor's office, state House and state Senate in 9 nine states, while Democrats enjoy what is called "total control" in 16.[4] The Democrats have highlighted Texas as a battleground to wrestle total control from the Republicans, while Ohio is one state where Republicans were trying to obtain total control for redistricting.[5] After the election, Republicans now hold trifecta control in 20 states while Democrats have trifectas in 11.

Based on preliminary estimates of the census data, there were eight states expected to gain Congressional seats -- seven of which generally lean Republican. Concurrently, of the 10 states that might lose seats, seven have typically voted Democratic.[6] This could lead to a scenario where Republicans also gain control over an additional 11 votes in the electoral college.[6]

Prior to the election, a New York Times article quoted Republicans predicting they will gain at least 10 state legislative chambers (including: the Indiana House of Representatives, Ohio House of Representatives and Wisconsin State Senate). Meanwhile, Democrats explained they had a chance to win back control in several chambers including Tennessee House of Representatives, Texas House of Representatives and Michigan State Senate. The Republican State Leadership Committee planned to spend about $18 million on state elections while the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee planned to spend about $20 million.[7] All of the chambers mentioned above were won by Republicans on election night -- some of which my huge margins, including Texas and Tennessee.

E.J. Dionne, columnist for the Washington Post, noted that more legislative power for Republicans will equate to a better chance of drawing maps to elect Republicans. However, much of that power will also rest on the success of Republicans vs. Democrats in the gubernatorial and Secretary of State elections. In many states, redistricting authority rests with politicians beyond just the legislature. For example, Ohio's redistricting is determined by a commission with the Governor, Secretary of State and State Auditor.[8]

The Republican advantage in redistricting is the first time this occurred since the current system was implemented in the 1980s.[9] According to Carl Klarner, a political scientist at Indiana State University, Democrats have had at least a 2-to-1 advantage in redistricting authority over the past 40 years. Klarner predicted Republicans would pick up 15 chambers on November 2, bringing their total to 51. They won 19 additional chambers.[10]

Partisan control

According to Tim Storey, an elections analyst for the National Conference of State Legislatures, when it comes to 2010's state legislative elections, "This is going to be an extremely challenging year for Democrats for a variety of reasons...History is not on their side. Since 1900, the party in the White House loses seats in the legislature in every midterm except for 1934 and 2002. That's a 2-25 losing streak for the party in the White House -- a tough trend to break. Add to that the fact that Democrats were riding high right now at over 55 percent of all seats, and it shapes up to be possibly the worst election for Democrats since 1994."[11] Democrats had gained seats at the state level in each election since 2004.[12]

Heading into the November 2 elections, the Democratic Party held a commanding lead in state houses in the 88 legislative chambers that held elections in 2010. 52 of the 88 chambers, or nearly 60% of them, had a Democratic majority, while 33 of them had a Republican majority. (Two chambers had an exactly equal number of Democrats and Republicans and one is officially nonpartisan.)

Legislative chamber Democratic Party Republican Party Constitution_Party#Independent_American_Party_of_Nevada Independent
State senates 23 18 1 1
State houses 29 15 1 -
Totals: 52 33 2 1

On October 11, Storey released information detailing the 11 states that might swing partisan control.[13] There were 11 states and 16 total chambers that Storey deemed battlegrounds. Below are the 11 states as detailed by Storey, along with the party that eventually won the chamber.

State Battleground chamber Majority party before election 2010 election winner
Alabama House and Senate Democratic Party Republican Party both
Alaska Senate Purple.png Purple.png
Colorado House and Senate Democratic Party Democratic Party Senate, Republican Party House
Indiana House Democratic Party Republican Party
Montana House Purple.png Republican Party
New Hampshire House and Senate Democratic Party Republican Party both
New York Senate Democratic Party Republican Party
North Carolina House and Senate Democratic Party Republican Party both
Ohio House Democratic Party Republican Party
Pennsylvania House Democratic Party Republican Party
Wisconsin House and Senate Democratic Party Republican Party both

As the election drew closer, analysts predicted more and more chambers would switch to Republican control. According to Storey, an average of 13 chambers change party control every two-year cycle.[13]

Alan Abramowitz, a political science professor at Emory University, predicted between 400 and 500 Democratic seats to go Republican on November 2.[9] He predicted this would also result in Republicans winning the majority in 15 to 18 new legislative chambers.[9]

State senates

See also: State senate elections, 2010

As of October 2010, the Democratic Party held the majority in 28 state senates. 23 of those state senates had state senate elections in 2010. The Republican Party held the majority in 20 senates, and 18 of those senates held elections in November.

2010 State senate elections
ALAKARARCACOCTDEFLGAHIIDILINIAKYMEMDMAMIMNMOMTNENVNHNYNCNDOHOKORPARISDTNTXUTVTWAWVWIWY
Parties with candidates
Impact of term limits
Successful challengers
Defeated incumbents
State house elections
State senate elections
State legislative elections
  • In 23 of the 43 state senates with an election in November, the Democratic Party was the majority party heading into the elections.
  • In 18 of the state senates, the Republican Party was the majority party
  • In 1 state (Alaska), there was an equal number of Democratic and Republican senators heading into November.
  • In 1 of the 43 states (Nebraska), state senators are officially nonpartisan.

An analysis by Louis Jacobson, a staff writer for PolitiFact, asserted that partisan dominance was at stake in 12 of the 43 state senates with elections in 2010, while 31 state senates were very likely to close out the year with no change in majority party. Jacobson identified the 12 states in the chart below as battleground states for state senate partisan dominance:[11]

(To sort columns, click on the Sort icon.gif icon at the top of any column.)

State Current majority party Jacobson's analysis
Alabama Democratic Party Toss-up
Alaska Constitution_Party#Independent_American_Party_of_Nevada Toss-up
Colorado Democratic Party Leans Democratic Party
Iowa Democratic Party Leans Democratic Party
Maine Democratic Party Leans Democratic Party
Montana Republican Party Leans Republican Party
Nevada Democratic Party Leans Democratic Party
North Carolina Democratic Party Leans Democratic Party
New Hampshire Democratic Party Toss-up
New York Democratic Party Toss-up
Tennessee Republican Party Leans Republican Party
Wisconsin Democratic Party Toss-up

The gist of Jacobson's analysis is that while 2 states held by Republicans were vulnerable to a shift in partisan control, 9 states held by Democrats were vulnerable to a shift and one state with party parity (Alaska) could go either way. This means that the Democratic Party is in a position of heightened vulnerability when it comes to retaining control of partisan dominance in state legislatures, compared to the degree of vulnerability of the GOP.

Another prediction from the Republican State Leadership Committee listed six chambers as easy Republican wins -- Indiana House, Michigan House, North Carolina House, Ohio House, Pennsylvania House and Wisconsin Senate. Republicns won all of those chambers. Additionally, 11 other Democratically-controlled chambers were also considered possible to swing Republican. They were: Alabama House, Alabama Senate, Colorado House, Colorado Senate, Iowa House, Iowa Senate, Illinois House, New York Senate, North Carolina Senate, Oregon Senate, and Wisconsin Senate.[14] Of those 11, only the Colorado Senate, Iowa Senate, Illinois House and possibly the New York Senate did not switch party hands.

As the election date drew closer, more forecasts of shown the atmosphere worsening for the Democrats. Jacobson's second prediction showed 28 chambers in play -- 25 controlled by Democrats.[15] Since the initial prediction in July, the following chambers shifted in the Republican's favor:

State houses

State house elections
ALAKARARCACOCTDEFLGAHIIDILINIAKSKYMEMDMAMIMNMOMTNVNHNMNYNCNDOHOKORPARISCSDTNTXUTVTWAWVWIWY
Parties with candidates
Impact of term limits
Successful challengers
Defeated incumbents
State house elections
State senate elections
State legislative elections
See also: State house elections, 2010

As of October 2010, the Democratic Party held the majority in 32 state houses. 30 of those state houses had state house elections in 2010. The Republican Party held the majority in 16 houses, and 15 of those houses had elections in November.

  • In 30 of the 45 state houses with an election in November, the Democratic Party was the majority party heading into the elections.
  • In 15 of the state houses, the Republican Party was the majority party
  • In 1 state (Montana), there was an equal number of Democratic and Republican representatives heading into November.

Impact of term limits

Main article: Impact of term limits on state legislative elections in 2010

Fourteen state senate chambers and thirteen state house chambers that held general elections On November 2, 2010, included some state legislators who were unable to run for re-election in 2010 because of their state's legislative term limits.

122 state senators were termed-out in 2010. This represents 36% of the 337 total state senate seats up for election in November in the 14 term-limited state senates with elections in 2010.

253 state representatives were termed-out. This represents 20% of the 1,263 total seats up for election in November in the 13 term-limited states with elections in November 2010.

Altogether, 375 current state legislators must leave office after the November elections because of term limits. This is 23% of the 1,600 state legislative seats up for election in the 14 term-limited states with 2010 elections.

State senators

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2010

43 state senates held general elections in November 2010. In 14 of these states, state senate terms are subject to term limits. Louisiana is the only state with state senate term limits that did not hold a general election for its state senate in 2010.

122 current state senators were ineligible to run for re-election in November because of term limit laws in their state. This included 55 incumbent Democratic state senators, 66 incumbent Republican state senators and 1 nonpartisan state senator.

Going into the November 2010 election, the Democratic Party was the majority party in 5 of the 14 state senates with term limits. The Republican Party was the majority party in 8 of the term-limited state senates. Nebraska's state senate is term-limited and officially nonpartisan.

  • In 7 states, the term limits axe fell more heavily on incumbent Republicans: Arizona, Florida, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Ohio and South Dakota. In all seven of these states, the current majority party is also the Republican Party.
  • In 4 states, the term limits axe fell more heavily on incumbent Democrats: Arkansas, Colorado, Nevada and Oklahoma. In three of these states, the current majority party is also the Democratic Party.
  • In 2 states, the axe fell equally on both parties (California and Maine).
  • The Oklahoma State Senate elections is the only state where the current minority party (the Democratic Party) is losing more senators (4) than the current majority party, the Republicans, who lost 2 senators.

State representatives

See also: Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2010

In 13 of the 45 state house chambers with November elections, state house terms were subject to term limits. (15 states have state legislative term limits, but Louisiana did not hold a state house election in 2010 and Nebraska does not have a state house.)

Going into the November 2010 election, the Democratic Party was the majority party in 7 of the 13 state houses with term limits. The Republican Party was the majority party in 5 of the term-limited state houses. One state -- Montana -- is equal with 50 Republicans and 50 Democrats.

  • In 6 states, the term limits axe fell more heavily on incumbent Republicans: Arizona, Florida, Missouri, Montana, Oklahoma and South Dakota. In 5 of these states, the current majority party was also the Republican Party. The Montana House is currently evenly split at 50 Democrats and 50 Republicans.
  • In 6 states, the term limits axe fell more heavily on incumbent Democrats: Arkansas, California, Colorado, Michigan, Nevada and Ohio. In all 6 of these states, the current majority party was also the Democratic Party.
  • In 1 state, the axe fell equally on both parties (Maine).

Impact on parties

The Republican Party is took more of a hit from term limits in the 2010 state legislative elections than the Democratic Party, both in terms of how many individual incumbent legislators the Republican Party is losing (190, versus 182 for the Democratic Party) and in terms of how many state legislative chambers lost more Republicans (13, versus 10 for the Democratic Party).

Chart indicating impact on individual legislators by party:

Party # of termed senators # of termed representatives Total
Democratic 55 127 182
Republican 66 124 190
Nonpartisan 1 2 3

Chart indicating impact on legislative chambers by party:

Party Senates with most losses Houses with most losses Total
Democratic 4 6 10
Republican 7 6 13
Equal D/R losses 2 1 3

Chart indicating termed-out seats changing party hands

Term-limited seats that changed party control in the 2010 elections
State Senators Termed Out 2010 Representatives Termed Out 2010 Democratic Seats lost to other Parties - Senate Republican Seats lost to other Parties - Senate Democratic Seats lost to other Parties - House Republican Seats lost to other Parties - House Percent of Termed-Out Senate Seats that Changed Party Percent of Termed-Out House Seats that Changed Party Total Legislative Seats that Changed Party
Arizona 10 13 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0
Arkansas 13 34 Republican Party 7 0 Republican Party 11 Democratic Party 1 53.8% 35.3% 19
California 8 18 0 0 Independent 1 Democratic Party 1 0% 11.1% 2
Colorado 3 8 0 0 Republican Party 1 0 0% 12.5% 1
Florida 7 23 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0
Maine 4 20 Republican Party 1 0 Republican Party 5, Independent 1 Democratic Party 2 25% 40% 9
Michigan 29 37 Republican Party 3 0 Republican Party 6 Democratic Party 1 10.3% 18.9% 10
Missouri 10 52 Republican Party 1 0 Republican Party 6 0 10% 11.5% 7
Montana 15 15 Republican Party 2 0 Republican Party 4 0 13.3% 26.7% 6
Nebraska 1 N/A[16] 0 0 - - 0% - 0
Nevada 4 10 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0
Ohio 7 13 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0
Oklahoma 6 4 Republican Party 4 0 0 0 66.7% 0% 4
South Dakota 4 8 Republican Party 1 0 Republican Party 1 Democratic Party 1 25% 25% 3
Total: 121 255 Republican Party 19 0 Republican Party 34, Independent 2 Democratic Party 6 15.7% 16.5% 61
Legend:
Democratic Party = Seat picked up by DemocratRepublican Party = Seat picked up by RepublicanIndependent = Seat picked up by Third Party




Analysis of competitiveness

2010 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness logo 4.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents with no primary challenge in 2010
Incumbents with no challenges at all in 2010
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Major party challengers (state comparison)
List of candidates with no competition
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Results Comparisons  Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2011 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Party differences
Competitiveness Index
2010 State Legislative Elections
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092011201220132014

An overview of the degree of competitiveness of the 2010 state legislative elections was conducted that examined three competitiveness factors:

Competitiveness logo 4.jpg
Green check mark transparent.png 1,133 incumbents faced a primary challenger in 2010.
Green check mark transparent.png 3,852 incumbents (77.3%) running for re-election in 2010 had no primary challenger.
Green check mark transparent.png Since 4,985 incumbents ran for re-election in 2010, that means that only 22.7% of incumbents faced a primary challenger.
Green check mark transparent.png There are only 24 total third party legislators in the state legislature. Thus, major parties are virtually guaranteed election.
Green check mark transparent.png 2,000 major party candidates (32.7%) have no major party challenger on November 2.
Green check mark transparent.png In 4,985 (81.4%) of the 6,125 seats up for election on November 2, the incumbent ran for re-election.
Green check mark transparent.png In 1,140 (18.6%) of the 6,125 seats up for election on November 2, the incumbent did not run for re-election.
Green check mark transparent.png 375 incumbents, in 14 states, did not run because they were not allowed to, due to state legislative term limits in their state.
Green check mark transparent.png Alternatively, of the 6,125 legislative seats up for election in 2010, 5,750 incumbents could, legally, have run again in 2010.
Green check mark transparent.png Of those 5,750 seats, 770 incumbents, or 13.4%, who could have run again in 2010 chose not to.
Green check mark transparent.png After adjusting for term limited state legislators, 86.6% of the incumbents who were legally able to run again in 2010 chose to run again.

According to our electoral competitiveness metric, the five most competitive state legislative chambers holding elections this year are:

  1. New Hampshire
  2. Michigan
  3. Arizona
  4. Nevada
  5. Maryland

Based on our index, the five states with the least competitive elections are:

46. Texas
45. Tennessee
44. Delaware
43. Kentucky
42. New Mexico

We arrived at these overall rankings by adding up the individual ranks from open seats, primary opposition, and major party general election challenge and then dividing by three.

Impact of Tea Party movement

Ballotpedia:Tea Parties and State Legislatures
See also: Ballotpedia:Tea Parties and State Legislatures

A survey of state and local tea parties around the country was undertaken to gain a measurement of the extent to which Tea Party activists were (or were not, as the case may be) involving themselves in 2010's state legislative elections.

Alabama

Alabama's primary was held on June 1.

The Alabama legislative elections ranked 22nd in overall electoral competitiveness.

Alabama's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins at midnight following the day of the election.

Elections were held in all 35 of Alabama's senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 27 of the 35 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 11 of the 105 state house seats up for election.

The last time a chamber in Alabama was controlled by Republicans was 1872. But according to analysts, the chamber may swing from Democratic control on November 2.[5]

The Alabama State Senate and Alabama House of Representatives were regarded as "Toss ups" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

Alaska

Alaska's primary was held on August 24.

The Alaska legislative elections ranked 31st in overall electoral competitiveness.

Alaska's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins the 4th Monday of January following a November election.

Elections were held in 10 of Alaska's 20 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 9 of the 10 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 36 of the 40 state house seats up for election.

Arizona

Partisan dominance in state legislatures
heading into the 2010 state legislative elections
Nevada State LegislatureMassachusetts General CourtColorado General AssemblyNew Mexico State LegislatureWyoming State LegislatureArizona State LegislatureMontana State LegislatureCalifornia State LegislatureOregon State LegislatureWashington State LegislatureIdaho State LegislatureTexas State LegislatureOklahoma State LegislatureKansas State LegislatureNebraska State Senate (Unicameral)South Dakota State LegislatureNorth Dakota State LegislatureMinnesota State LegislatureIowa State LegislatureMissouri State LegislatureArkansas State LegislatureLouisiana State LegislatureMississippi State LegislatureAlabama State LegislatureGeorgia State LegislatureFlorida State LegislatureSouth Carolina State LegislatureIllinois State LegislatureWisconsin State LegislatureTennessee State LegislatureNorth Carolina State LegislatureIndiana State LegislatureOhio State LegislatureKentucky State LegislaturePennsylvania State LegislatureNew Jersey State LegislatureNew York State LegislatureVermont State LegislatureVermont State LegislatureNew Hampshire State LegislatureMaine State LegislatureWest Virginia State LegislatureVirginia State LegislatureMaryland State LegislatureMaryland State LegislatureConnecticut State LegislatureConnecticut State LegislatureDelaware State LegislatureDelaware State LegislatureRhode Island State LegislatureRhode Island State LegislatureMassachusetts State LegislatureNew Hampshire State LegislatureMichigan State LegislatureMichigan State LegislatureAlaska State LegislaturePartisan Breakdown State Legislatures2.jpg

Arizona's primary was held on August 24.

The Arizona legislative elections ranked 3rd in overall electoral competitiveness.

Arizona's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins the first day of the session after they are elected. Each regular session begins on the second Monday in January. Members are limited to four terms, for a total of eight years.

Elections were held in all 30 of Arizona's senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 15 of the 30 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 36 of the 60 state house seats up for election.

Arkansas

The Arkansas primary was held on May 18.

The Arkansas legislative elections ranked 33rd in overall electoral competitiveness.

Arkansas's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins the first day of the session after they are elected. Each regular session begins on the second Monday in January. Members are limited to two terms, for a total of eight years.

Elections were held in 17 of Arkansas's 35 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 4 of the 17 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 60 of the 100 state house seats up for election.

The Arkansas State Senate is regarded as "Leans Republican" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

California

California's primary was held on June 8.

The California legislative elections ranked 11th in overall electoral competitiveness.

California's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins at midnight following the day of the election. Senators are limited to serving no more than two four-year terms. California's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins one month after their election. Representatives are limited to serving no more than four two-year terms.

Elections were held in 20 of California's 40 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 10 of the 20 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Eight of the ten retiring incumbents are ineligible due to term limits.

Elections were held in all of California's 80 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 52 of the 80 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Eighteen of the 28 retiring incumbents are ineligible due to term limits.

Colorado

Colorado's primary was held on August 10.

The Colorado legislative elections ranked 21st in overall electoral competitiveness.

Colorado's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on first day of the legislative session after their election. Senators are limited to no more than two consecutive terms. Colorado's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on first day of the legislative session after their election. Representatives are limited to no more than four consecutive terms.

Elections were held in 19 of Colorado's 35 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 13 of the 19 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Colorado's 65 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 51 of the 65 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Colorado House of Representatives is regarded as a "Toss up" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes, while the Colorado State Senate is considered to "Lean Democratic."

Connecticut

The Connecticut primary was held on August 10.

The Connecticut legislative elections ranked 36th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Connecticut's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the Wednesday following the first Monday of January after their election. Connecticut's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the Wednesday following the first Monday of January after their election.

Elections were held in all of Connecticut's 36 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 32 of the 36 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Connecticut's 151 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 136 of the 151 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Delaware

The Delaware primary was held on September 14.

The Delaware legislative elections ranked 44th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Delaware's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins the day after their election. Delaware's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins the day after their election.

Elections were held in 11 of Delaware's 21 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in all of the state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Delaware's 41 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 36 of the 41 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Delaware House of Representatives is regarded to "Lean Democratic" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

Florida

The Florida primary was held on August 24.

The Florida legislative elections ranked 17th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Florida's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins two weeks following their election. Senators are limited to no more than two consecutive four-year terms. Florida's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins two weeks following their election. Representatives are limited to no more than four consecutive terms.

Elections were held in 22 of Florida's 40 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 10 of the 22 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Florida's 120 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 87 of the 120 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Georgia

The Georgia primary was held on July 20.

The Georgia legislative elections ranked 28th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Georgia's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the second Monday in January. Georgia's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the second Monday in January.

Elections were held in all of Georgia's 56 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 45 of the 56 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in 180 of Georgia's 180 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 153 of the 180 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Hawaii

State legislatures where heading into November 2010
the Democratic Party is in the majority in both chambers
Nevada State LegislatureMassachusetts General CourtColorado General AssemblyNew Mexico State LegislatureWyoming State LegislatureArizona State LegislatureMontana State LegislatureCalifornia State LegislatureOregon State LegislatureWashington State LegislatureIdaho State LegislatureTexas State LegislatureOklahoma State LegislatureKansas State LegislatureNebraska State Senate (Unicameral)South Dakota State LegislatureNorth Dakota State LegislatureMinnesota State LegislatureIowa State LegislatureMissouri State LegislatureArkansas State LegislatureLouisiana State LegislatureMississippi State LegislatureAlabama State LegislatureGeorgia State LegislatureFlorida State LegislatureSouth Carolina State LegislatureIllinois State LegislatureWisconsin State LegislatureTennessee State LegislatureNorth Carolina State LegislatureIndiana State LegislatureOhio State LegislatureKentucky State LegislaturePennsylvania State LegislatureNew Jersey State LegislatureNew York State LegislatureVermont State LegislatureVermont State LegislatureNew Hampshire State LegislatureMaine State LegislatureWest Virginia State LegislatureVirginia State LegislatureMaryland State LegislatureMaryland State LegislatureConnecticut State LegislatureConnecticut State LegislatureDelaware State LegislatureDelaware State LegislatureRhode Island State LegislatureRhode Island State LegislatureMassachusetts State LegislatureNew Hampshire State LegislatureMichigan State LegislatureMichigan State LegislatureAlaska State LegislatureDemocratic control of both chambers.png

The Hawaii primary was held on September 18.

The Hawaii legislative elections ranked 6th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Hawaii's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of Legislative session after the election (usually the third Wednesday of January). Hawaii's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of Legislative session after the election (usually the third Wednesday of January).

Elections were held in 15 of Hawaii's 25 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 12 of the 15 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Hawaii's 51 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 46 of the 51 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Idaho

The Idaho primary was held on May 25.

The Idaho legislative elections ranked 30th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Idaho's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of December following the general election. Idaho's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of December following the general election.

Elections were held in all of Idaho's 35 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 34 of the 35 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Idaho's 70 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 62 of the 70 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Illinois

The Illinois primary was held on February 2.

The Illinois legislative elections ranked 39th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Illinois' state senators are elected to a two or four-year term that begins on the second Wednesday in January. Under the Illinois Constitution of 1970, senators are divided into three groups, each group having a two-year term at a different part of the decade between censuses, with the rest of the decade being taken up by two four-year terms Illinois' state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the second Wednesday in January.

Elections were held in 21 of Illinois's 59 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 20 of the 21 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Illinois's 118 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 107 of the 118 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Indiana

The Indiana primary was held on May 4.

The Indiana legislative elections ranked 37th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Indiana's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the day after their general election. Indiana's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the day after their general election.

Elections were held in 25 of Indiana's 50 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 22 of the 25 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Indiana's 100 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 93 of the 100 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Indiana House of Representatives is regarded to "Lean Republican" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

Iowa

The Iowaprimary was held on June 8.

The Iowa legislative elections ranked 29th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Iowa's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of January after their election. Iowa's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of January after their election.

Elections were held in 25 of Iowa's 50 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 22 of the 25 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Iowa's 100 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 86 of the 100 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Iowa House of Representatives is regarded as a "Toss up" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes, while the Iowa State Senate is considered to "Lean Republican."

Kansas

State legislatures where heading into the November 2, 2010 elections
the Republican Party is in the majority in both chambers
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The Kansas primary was held on August 3.

Kansas did not hold any state senate elections in 2010.

The Kansas legislative elections ranked 34th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Kansas's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the second Monday of January after their election.

Elections were held in all of Kansas's 125 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 115 of the 125 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Kentucky

The Kentucky primary was held on May 18.

The Kentucky legislative elections ranked 43rd in overall electoral competitiveness.

Kentucky's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of January after their election. Kentucky's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of January after their election.

Elections were held in 19 of Kentucky's 38 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 17 of the 19 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Kentucky's 100 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 95 of the 100 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Louisiana

Louisiana did not hold any state legislative elections in 2010.

Maine

The Maine primary was held on June 8.

The Maine legislative elections ranked 14th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Maine's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Wednesday in December after their election. Senators are limited to no more than four consecutive terms. Maine's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Wednesday in December after their election. Representatives are limited to no more than four consecutive terms.

Elections were held in all of Maine's 35 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 25 of the 35 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Maine's 153 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 117 of the 153 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Maine State Senate is regarded as a "Toss up" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

Maryland

The Maryland primary was held on September 14.

The Maryland legislative elections ranked 5th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Maryland's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the second Wednesday in January after the election. Maryland's state representatives are elected to a four-year term that begins on the second Wednesday in January after the election.

Elections were held in all of Maryland's 47 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 44 of the 47 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Maryland's 141 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 119 of the 141 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Massachusetts

The Massachusetts primary was held on September 14.

The Massachusetts legislative elections ranked 40th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Massachusetts' state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Wednesday in January after the election. Massachusetts' state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Wednesday in January after the election.

Elections were held in all of Massachusetts's 40 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 32 of the 40 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Massachusetts's 160 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 136 of the 160 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Michigan

State legislatures where heading into November 2010
partisan control is split between the two legislative chambers
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The Michigan primary was held on August 3.

The Michigan legislative elections ranked 2nd in overall electoral competitiveness.

Michigan's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of January. Michigan's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of January.

Elections were held in all of Michigan's 38 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 9 of the 38 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Michigan's 110 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 59 of the 110 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Michigan House of Representatives is regarded to "Lean Democratic" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

Minnesota

The Minnesota primary was held on August 10.

The Minnesota legislative elections ranked 24th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Minnesota's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of the legislative session. Minnesota's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of the legislative session.

Elections were held in all of Minnesota's 67 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 58 of the 67 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Minnesota's 134 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 119 of the 134 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Minnesota House of Representatives is regarded to "Lean Democratic" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

Mississippi

Mississippi did not hold any state legislative elections in 2010.

Missouri

The Missouri primary was held on August 3.

The Missouri legislative elections ranked 20th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Missouri's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of the legislative session. Senators are limited to no more than two four-year terms. Missouri's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of the legislative session. Representatives are limited to no more than four two-year terms.

Elections were held in 17 of Missouri's 34 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 7 of the 17 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. All ten incumbents not seeking re-election are ineligible due to term limits. Elections were held in all of Mississippi's 163 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 100 of the 163 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Montana

The Montana primary was held on June 8.

The Montana legislative elections ranked 12th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Montana's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first Monday of January following the election. Montana term limits state that officials may not seek re-election if they have held office for eight years in a 16-year period. Montana's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Monday of January following the election. Montana term limits state that officials may not seek re-election if they have held office for eight years in a 16-year period.

Elections were held in 25 of Montana's 50 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 9 of the 25 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Of the incumbents not seeking re-election, one is eligible and 15 are ineligible due to term limits. Elections were held in all of Montana's 100 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 67 of the 100 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Montana House of Representatives is regarded to "Lean Republican" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

Nebraska

The Nebraska primary was held on May 11.

The Nebraska legislative elections ranked 7th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Nebraska's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first Wednesday after the first Monday in January. Senators are limited to no more than two four-year terms.

Elections were held in 24 of Nebraska's 49 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 21 of the 49 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Nevada

The Nevada primary was held on June 8.

The Nevada legislative elections ranked 4th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Nevada's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the day after the election. Nevada's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the day after the election.

Elections were held in 11 of Nevada's 21 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 3 of the 11 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. There are currently two vacant seats up for election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Nevada's 42 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 23 of the 42 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

New Hampshire

The New Hampshire primary was held on September 14.

The New Hampshire legislative elections ranked 1st in overall electoral competitiveness.

New Hampshire's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the month after elections (December). New Hampshire's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the month after elections (December).

Elections were held in all of New Hampshire's 24 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 19 of the 24 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of New Hampshire's 400 assembly district seats on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 297 of the 400 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The New Hampshire State Senate and New Hampshire House of Representatives were regarded as "Toss ups" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes

New Jersey

Only one state legislature is officially nonpartisan
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New Jersey did not hold any state legislative elections in 2010.

New Mexico

The New Mexico primary was held on May 18.

The New Mexico legislative elections ranked 42nd in overall electoral competitiveness.

New Mexico's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on January 1st.

Elections were held in all of New Mexico's 70 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 67 of the 70 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

New York

The New York primary was held on September 14.

The New York legislative elections ranked 13th in overall electoral competitiveness.

New York's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on January 1st. New York's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on January 1st.

Elections were held in all of New York's 62 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 56 of the 62 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. There one district seat that is currently vacant.

Elections were held in all of New York's 150 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 131 of the 150 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Democrats regained the Senate in 2008 for the first time in more than 40 years.[17]The New York State Senate is regarded as a "Toss up" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes. Senate Democrats have spent $31.1 million while Republicans have spent $23.5 million on this year's races.[17]

North Carolina

The North Carolina primary was held on June 22.

The North Carolina legislative elections ranked 19th in overall electoral competitiveness.

North Carolina's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of the new General Assembly in January. North Carolina's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of the new General Assembly in January.

Elections were held in all of North Carolina's 50 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 42 of the 50 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of North Carolina's 120 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 110 of the 120 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The North Carolina State Senate and North Carolina House of Representatives were regarded as "Toss ups" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

North Dakota

The North Dakota primary was held on June 8.

The North Dakota legislative elections ranked 25th in overall electoral competitiveness.

North Dakota's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on December 1st. North Dakota's state representatives are elected to a four-year term that begins on December 1st.

Elections were held in 24 of North Dakota's 47 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 20 of the 24 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all odd-numbered assembly districts, meaning 48 of North Dakota's 94 assembly districts were up on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 36 of the 48 state house seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Ohio

The Ohio primary was held on May 4.

The Ohio legislative elections ranked 8th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Ohio's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on January 1st. Senators are limited to no more than two consecutive terms. Ohio's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on January 1st. Representatives are limited to no more than four consecutive terms.

Elections were held in 17 of Ohio's 33 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 9 of the 17 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Ohio's 99 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 78 of the 99 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Ohio House of Representatives is regarded to "Lean Republican" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

Oklahoma

The Oklahoma primary was held on July 27.

The Oklahoma legislative elections ranked 32nd in overall electoral competitiveness.

Oklahoma's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on November 17th. Senators are limited to no more than a combined total of twelve years in the senate and house of representatives. Oklahoma's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on November 17th. Representatives are limited to no more than a combined total of twelve years in the senate and house of representatives.

Elections were held in 24 of Oklahoma's 48 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 16 of the 24 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Oklahoma's 101 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 87 of the 101 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Oregon

The Oregon primary was held on May 18.

The Oregon legislative elections ranked 27th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Oregon's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the second Monday in January. Oregon's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the second Monday in January.

Elections were held in 16 of Oregon's 30 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 14 of the 16 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Oregon's 60 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 55 of the 60 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Oregon State Senate is regarded as "Leans Democratic" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania primary was held on May 18.

The Pennsylvania legislative elections ranked 38th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Pennsylvania's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins in January. Pennsylvania's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins in January.

Elections were held in 25 of Pennsylvania's 50 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 22 of the 25 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Pennsylvania's 203 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 185 of the 203 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Pennsylvania House of Representatives is regarded to "Lean Republican" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

Rhode Island

The Rhode Island primary was held on September 14.

The Rhode Island legislative elections ranked 15th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Rhode Island's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Tuesday in January. Rhode Island's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Tuesday in January.

Elections were held in all of Rhode Island's 38 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 33 of the 38 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Rhode Island's 75 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 65 of the 75 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

South Carolina

The South Carolina primary was held on June 8.

The South Carolina legislative elections ranked 41st in overall electoral competitiveness.

South Carolina's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the Monday after the election.

Elections were held in all of South Carolina's 124 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 114 of the 124 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

South Dakota

The South Dakota primary was held on June 8.

The South Dakota legislative elections ranked 18th in overall electoral competitiveness.

South Dakota's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of session after election (Jan. 11). Senators are limited to no more than four consecutive terms. South Dakota's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of session after election (Jan. 11). Representatives are limited to no more than four consecutive terms.

Elections were held in all of South Dakota's 35 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 22 of the 35 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Elections were held in all of South Dakota's 70 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 48 of the 70 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Tennessee

The Tennessee primary was held on August 5.

The Tennessee legislative elections ranked 45th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Tennessee's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the 15th of January after the election. Tennessee's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the 15th of January after the election.

Elections were held in 17 of Tennessee's 33 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 15 of the 17 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Tennessee's 99 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 91 of the 99 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Texas

The Texas primary was held on April 13.

The Texas legislative elections ranked 46th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Texas's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the beginning of the legislative session (January). Texas's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the beginning of the legislative session (January).

Elections were held in 16 of Texas's 31 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 15 of the 16 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Texas's 150 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 143 of the 150 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Utah

The Utah primary was held on June 22.

Utah's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of January following a November election. Utah's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of January following a November election.

Elections were held in 15 of Utah's 29 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 14 of the 15 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Utah's 75 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 66 of the 75 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Utah legislative elections ranked 10th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Vermont

The Vermont primary was held on August 24.

The Vermont legislative elections ranked as 35th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Vermont's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Wednesday after the first Tuesday in January. Vermont's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Wednesday after the first Tuesday in January.

Elections were held for all of Vermont's 30 senate district seats on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 27 of the 30 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Vermont's 150 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 133 of the 150 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Virginia

Virginia did not hold any state legislative elections in 2010.

Washington

The Washington primary was held on August 17.

The Washington legislative elections ranked as 26th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Washington's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of session. Washington's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of session.

Elections were held in 25 of Washington's 49 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 20 of the 25 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Washington's 98 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 82 of the 98 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Washington State Senate and Washington House of Representatives were regarded as "Lean Democratic" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes.

West Virginia

2010 State senate elections
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Successful challengers
Defeated incumbents
State house elections
State senate elections
State legislative elections

The West Virginia primary was held on May 11.

The West Virginia legislative elections ranked as 9th in overall electoral competitiveness.

West Virginia's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of December following the election. West Virginia's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of December following the election.

Elections were held in 17 of West Virginia's 34 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 15 of the 17 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of West Virginia's 100 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 89 of the 100 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

Wisconsin

The Wisconsin primary was held on September 14.

The Wisconsin legislative elections ranked as 16th in overall electoral competitiveness.

Wisconsin's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first Monday in January following the election. Wisconsin's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Monday in January following the election.

Elections were held in 17 of Wisconsin's 33 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 14 of the 17 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Wisconsin's 99 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 79 of the 99 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

The Wisconsin State Senate is regarded as a "Toss up" by Ballotpedia's projection of probable electoral outcomes, while the Wisconsin State Assembly is considered to "Lean Republican."

Wyoming

The Wyoming primary was held on August 17.

The Wyoming legislative elections ranked as 23rd in overall electoral competitiveness.

Wyoming's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first Monday in January following the election. Wyoming's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Monday in January following the election.

Elections were held in 15 of Wyoming's 30 senate districts on November 2. The incumbent senator ran for re-election in 11 of the 15 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010. Elections were held in all of Wyoming's 60 assembly districts on November 2. The incumbent representative ran for re-election in 38 of the 60 state senate seats that were up for re-election in 2010.

See also

References