Difference between revisions of "State legislatures with term limits"

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Although the difference is marginal, the [[Republican Party]] took more of a hit from [[term limits on the ballot|term limits]] in the [[state legislative elections, 2012|2012 state legislative elections]] than the Democratic Party, both in terms of how many individual incumbent legislators the Republican Party lost (125, versus 122 for the Democratic Party) and in terms of how many state legislative chambers lost more Republicans (12, versus 10 for the Democratic Party).
 
Although the difference is marginal, the [[Republican Party]] took more of a hit from [[term limits on the ballot|term limits]] in the [[state legislative elections, 2012|2012 state legislative elections]] than the Democratic Party, both in terms of how many individual incumbent legislators the Republican Party lost (125, versus 122 for the Democratic Party) and in terms of how many state legislative chambers lost more Republicans (12, versus 10 for the Democratic Party).
 +
 +
=2014=
 +
::''Main article: [[Impact of term limits on state legislative elections in 2014]]''
 +
 +
'''Fourteen state senate chambers''' and '''thirteen state house chambers''' holding general elections on November 4, 2014, include some state legislators who are unable to run for re-election in 2014 because of their [[state legislatures with term limits|state's legislative term limits]].
 +
*A total of '''63 state senators''' are termed-out in 2014. This represents '''19%''' of the 331 total state senate seats up for election in the 14 term-limited state senates with elections in November 2014.
 +
*A total of '''160 state representatives''' are termed-out.  This represents '''12.7%''' of the 1,261 total seats up for election in the 13 term-limited states with elections in November 2014.
 +
 +
Altogether, '''223 current state legislators''' must leave office after the November elections because of term limits.  This is '''14%''' of the 1,592 state legislative seats up for election in the 14 term-limited states with 2014 elections, and about 3.7% of the 6,047 state legislative seats that are up for election altogether in 2014, including the non-term-limited states.
 +
 +
===State senators===
 +
:: ''Main article: [[Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2014]]''
 +
 +
There are 42 state senates holding general elections in November 2014.  In 14 of these states, state senators are [[state legislatures with term limits|subject to term limits]].  Louisiana is the only state with state senate term limits that will not have a general election in 2014.
 +
 +
A total of 63 [[:Category:Current members of state senates|current state senators]] are ineligible to run for re-election in November because of [[State legislatures with term limits|term limit laws]] in their state.  This includes:
 +
 +
* 22 incumbent Democratic state senators
 +
* 24 incumbent Republican state senators
 +
* 17 nonpartisan state senators.
 +
 +
Going into the 2014 elections, the [[Democratic Party]] is the majority party in four of the 14 state senates with term limits.  The [[Republican Party]] is the majority in 9 of the 14 state senates with term limits.  Nebraska's state senate is term-limited and officially [[Non-partisan]].
 +
 +
* In four states, more Democrats are term-limited out than Republicans.  In California, the majority party is Democratic. In Arkansas, Florida and Montana, the majority party is Republican.
 +
* In seven states, more Republicans are term-limited out than Democrats.  In Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma and South Dakota, the majority party is Republican. In Colorado, Maine and Nevada, the majority party is Democratic.
 +
* In one state, Ohio, equal numbers of Republicans and Democrats are term-limited in November 2014.  Heading into the election, the majority party in Ohio is Republican.
 +
* There are no Arizona senators affected by term-limits in 2014.
 +
 +
===State representatives===
 +
:: ''Main article: [[Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2014]]''
 +
 +
There are 45 state houses holding general elections in November 2014.  In 13 of these states, state house terms are [[state legislatures with term limits|subject to term limits]]. There are 15 states with [[state legislatures with term limits|state legislative term limits]], but Louisiana will not hold a state house election in 2014 and Nebraska does not have a state house.
 +
 +
160 current state representatives are ineligible to run for re-election in November because of term limit laws in their state. This includes:
 +
 +
* 73 incumbent Democratic state representatives
 +
* 87 incumbent Republican state representatives
 +
 +
Going into the 2014 elections, the [[Democratic Party]] is the majority party in four of the 14 state senates with term limits.  The [[Republican Party]] is the majority in 9 of the 14 state senates with term limits.  Nebraska's state senate is term-limited and officially [[Non-partisan]].
 +
 +
* In four states, more Democrats are term-limited out than Republicans.  In California, the majority party is Democratic. In Arkansas, Florida and Montana, the majority party is Republican.
 +
* In seven states, more Republicans are term-limited out than Democrats.  In Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma and South Dakota, the majority party is Republican. In Colorado, Maine and Nevada, the majority party is Democratic.
 +
* In one state, Ohio, equal numbers of Republicans and Democrats are term-limited in November 2014.  Heading into the election, the majority party in Ohio is Republican.
 +
* There are no Arizona senators affected by term-limits in 2014.
 +
 +
===Impact on parties===
 +
Republican representatives will take a larger hit from [[term limits on the ballot|term limits]] in the [[state legislative elections, 2014|2014 state legislative elections]] than the Democratic Party, both in terms of how many individual incumbent legislators the Republican Party will lose (113, versus 95 for the Democratic Party) and in terms of how many state legislative chambers lost more Republicans (12, versus 10 for Democrats).
 +
===Incumbents===
 +
The following table details the number of state legislators unable to run for re-election due to term limits broken down by party and chamber.  Republicans, who control about 11% more seats across the country, will lose 19% more incumbents to term limits than Democrats.
 +
{|class="wikitable" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="5" border="1" style="background:none" style="width:40%;"
 +
|-
 +
! style="background-color:#00008B; color: white;" | Party
 +
! style="background-color:#00008B; color: white;" | # of termed senators
 +
! style="background-color:#00008B; color: white;" | # of termed representatives
 +
! style="background-color:#00008B; color: white;" | Total
 +
 +
|-
 +
| Democratic
 +
| align="center" | 22
 +
| align="center" | 73
 +
| align="right" | '''95'''
 +
 +
|-
 +
| Republican
 +
| align="center" | 24
 +
| align="center" | 87
 +
| align="right" | '''113''' 
 +
 +
|-
 +
| Non-partisan
 +
| align="center" | 17
 +
| align="center" | 0
 +
| align="right" | '''17'''
 +
|}
 +
 +
===Chambers===
 +
The following table details the number of chambers where one party will lose more incumbents due to term limits.
 +
{|class="wikitable" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="5" border="1" style="background:none" style="width:40%;"
 +
|-
 +
! style="background-color:#00008B; color: white;" | Party
 +
! style="background-color:#00008B; color: white;" | Senates with most losses
 +
! style="background-color:#00008B; color: white;" | Houses with most losses
 +
! style="background-color:#00008B; color: white;" | Total
 +
 +
|-
 +
| Democratic
 +
| align="center" | 4
 +
| align="center" | 6
 +
| align="right" | '''10'''
 +
 +
|-
 +
| Republican
 +
| align="center" | 5
 +
| align="center" | 7
 +
| align="right" | '''12'''
 +
 +
|-
 +
| Equal D/R losses (or nonpartisan chamber)
 +
| align="center" | 4
 +
| align="center" | 0
 +
| align="right" | '''4'''
 +
|-
 +
 +
|}
  
 
<headertabs/>
 
<headertabs/>

Revision as of 12:10, 28 August 2014

SLP badge.png
State Legislatures with Term Limits

Lifetime versus consecutiveStates with legislative limits
Limits overturnedImpact on elections
Features of State Legislatures

Party dominance in state legislatures2012 Session TopicsStanding committees analysis for 2011-2012 sessionLength of terms of state representativesHow vacancies are filled in state legislaturesStates with a full-time legislatureState legislative chambers that use multi-member districtsState legislatures with term limitsComparison of state legislative salariesWhen state legislators assume office after a general electionPopulation represented by state legislatorsState constitutional articles governing state legislaturesState legislative sessionsResign-to-run laws
Voting on
Term Limits
Term limits.jpg
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot

State legislative
term limits

Gubernatorial
term limits
Lieutenant Governors
term limits
Secretaries of State
term limits
Attorneys General
term limits
State executive
term limits
In 15 state legislatures, state legislators are subject to term limits. Voters in six additional states voted to have term limits, only to have those votes nullified. In two cases, the state legislature voted to nullify the limits imposed by voters, while in four other states, courts nullified the voter-imposed limits, primarily for technical reasons.

In the United States, there are 1,972 state senate seats and 5,411 state house seats. 562 of the 1,972 state senate seats, or 28.5%, come with a limit. 1,368 of the 5,411 state house seats, or 25%, come with a limit. Of the total of 7,383 state legislative seats, 1,930 (26.1%) are limited.

Lifetime versus consecutive

Legislative term limits can be either lifetime or consecutive. In the nine states where the limits are consecutive, once a state legislator has served the maximum number of terms in office, he or she, if eligible, can run for office for the state's other legislative chamber, or leave the legislature. These states are Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Maine, Montana, Nebraska, Ohio and South Dakota.

After a period of time no longer in office in a particular legislative chamber, however, the legislator is allowed to run again for office in that legislative chamber. The period of time that a legislator must be out of office before being able to run again is usually two years.

In six of the 15 states with limits on state legislators, the limit is a lifetime limit. These states are Arkansas, California, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada and Oklahoma. In these states, once a legislator has served the maximum allowable number of terms in a particular legislative chamber, they may never again run for or hold office in that particular chamber.[1]

States with legislative limits

State legislature Limits in effect Year limits imposed Year limits took effect
Arizona Legislature H: 4 terms (8 years)
S: 4 terms (8 years)
1992 H: 2000
S: 2000
Arkansas Legislature H: 3 terms (6 years)
S: 2 terms (8 years)
1992 H: 1998
S: 2000
California Legislature 12 year cumulative total, in either or both 1990, modified 2012 A: 1996
S: 1998
Colorado Legislature H: 4 terms (8 years)
S: 2 terms (8 years)
1990 H: 1998
S: 1998
Florida Legislature H: 4 terms (8 years)
S: 2 terms (8 years)
1992 H: 2000
S: 2000
Louisiana Legislature H: 3 terms (12 years)
S: 3 terms (12 years)
1995 H: 2007
S: 2007
Maine Legislature H: 4 terms (8 years)
S: 4 terms (8 years)
1993 H: 1996
S: 1996
Michigan Legislature H: 3 terms (6 years)
S: 2 terms (8 years)
1992 H: 1998
S: 2002
Missouri Legislature H: 4 terms (8 years)
S: 2 terms (8 years)
Amendment 13 (1992)
(also see: Amendment 3 (2002)
H: 2002
S: 2002
Montana Legislature H: 4 terms (8 years)
S: 2 terms (8 years)
1992 H: 2000
S: 2000
Nebraska Unicameral S: 2 terms (8 years) 2000 S: 2008
Nevada Legislature A: 6 terms (12 years)
S: 3 terms (12 years)
Initiative passed in 1996, took effect with those elected in 1998 A: 2010
S: 2010
Ohio Legislature H: 4 terms (8 years)
S: 2 terms (8 years)
1992 H: 2000
S: 2000
Oklahoma Legislature 12 year cumulative total, in either or both 1990 2004 for both chambers
South Dakota Legislature H: 4 terms (8 years)
S: 4 terms (8 years)
1992 H: 2000
S: 2000

Limits overturned

By legislature

By courts

Impact on elections

[edit]

See also: Impact of term limits on state legislative elections in 2010
2011


2010
State senates:
ArizonaArkansasCalifornia
ColoradoFloridaMaine
MichiganMissouriMontana
NebraskaNevadaOhio
OklahomaSouth Dakota
State houses:
ArizonaArkansasCalifornia
ColoradoFloridaMaine
MichiganMissouriMontana
NevadaOhio
OklahomaSouth Dakota
State legislatures with term limits
Term limits on the ballot

14 state senate chambers and 13 state house chambers held general elections on November 2, 2010 that included some state legislators who were unable to run for re-election in 2010 because of their state's legislative term limits.

122 state senators were termed-out in 2010. This represented 36% of the 337 total state senate seats up for election in November in the 14 term-limited state senates with elections in 2010.

253 state representatives were termed-out. This represented 20% of the 1,263 total seats up for election in November in the 13 term-limited states with elections in November 2010.

Altogether, 375 current state legislators were required to leave office after the November elections because of term limits. This was 23% of the 1,600 state legislative seats up for election in the 14 term-limited states with 2010 elections.

The Republican Party took more of a hit from term limits in the 2010 state legislative elections than the Democratic Party, both in terms of how many individual incumbent legislators the Republican Party lost (190, versus 182 for the Democratic Party) and in terms of how many state legislative chambers lost more Republicans (13, versus 10 for the Democratic Party).

Incumbents

Party # of termed senators # of termed representatives Total
Democratic 55 127 182
Republican 66 124 190
Non-partisan 1 2 3

Chambers

Party Senates with most losses Houses with most losses Total
Democratic 4 6 10
Republican 7 6 13
Equal D/R losses 2 1 3

Impact on party control of seats

In 2010, a total of 376 seats were termed out in state senates and state houses combined. Of those, 61 seats, or 16.2%, changed party hands. In state senates, 19 seats, or 15.7% of termed-out seats, changed party hands. In state houses, 42 seats, or 16.5% of termed-out seats, changed party hands.

Term-limited seats that changed party control in the 2010 elections
State Senators Termed Out 2010 Representatives Termed Out 2010 Democratic Seats lost to other Parties - Senate Republican Seats lost to other Parties - Senate Democratic Seats lost to other Parties - House Republican Seats lost to other Parties - House Percent of Termed-Out Senate Seats that Changed Party Percent of Termed-Out House Seats that Changed Party Total Legislative Seats that Changed Party
Arizona 10 13 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0
Arkansas 13 34 Republican Party 7 0 Republican Party 11 Democratic Party 1 53.8% 35.3% 19
California 8 18 0 0 Independent 1 Democratic Party 1 0% 11.1% 2
Colorado 3 8 0 0 Republican Party 1 0 0% 12.5% 1
Florida 7 23 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0
Maine 4 20 Republican Party 1 0 Republican Party 5, Independent 1 Democratic Party 2 25% 40% 9
Michigan 29 37 Republican Party 3 0 Republican Party 6 Democratic Party 1 10.3% 18.9% 10
Missouri 10 52 Republican Party 1 0 Republican Party 6 0 10% 11.5% 7
Montana 15 15 Republican Party 2 0 Republican Party 4 0 13.3% 26.7% 6
Nebraska 1 N/A[2] 0 0 - - 0% - 0
Nevada 4 10 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0
Ohio 7 13 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0
Oklahoma 6 4 Republican Party 4 0 0 0 66.7% 0% 4
South Dakota 4 8 Republican Party 1 0 Republican Party 1 Democratic Party 1 25% 25% 3
Total: 121 255 Republican Party 19 0 Republican Party 34, Independent 2 Democratic Party 6 15.7% 16.5% 61




See also: Impact of term limits on state legislative elections in 2012
2014
2011
Term Limits
SLP badge.png
Impact of Term Limits by Year
2010201120122014
State senates
ArizonaArkansasCalifornia
ColoradoFloridaMaine
MissouriMontana
NebraskaNevadaOhio
OklahomaSouth Dakota
State houses
ArizonaArkansasCalifornia
ColoradoFloridaMaine
MichiganMissouriMontana
NevadaOhio
OklahomaSouth Dakota
State legislatures with term limits
Term limits on the ballot

Thirteen state senate chambers and thirteen state house chambers that held general elections on November 6, 2012 include some state legislators who were unable to run for re-election in 2012 because of their state's legislative term limits.

  • 83 state senators were termed-out in 2012. This represents 15.9% of the 523 total state senate seats up for election in the 13 term-limited state senates with elections in November 2012.
  • 172 state representatives were termed-out. This represents 13.6% of the 1,263 total seats up for election in the 13 term-limited states with elections in November 2012.

Altogether, 255 current state legislators had to leave office after the November elections because of term limits. This was 14.3% of the 1,786 state legislative seats up for election in the 14 term-limited states with 2012 elections, and about 4% of the 6,015 state legislative seats that were up for election altogether in 2012, including the non-term-limited states.

Incumbents

Party # of termed senators # of termed representatives Total
Democratic 33 85 118
Republican 38 84 122
Non-partisan 7 0 7

Chambers

Party Senates with most losses Houses with most losses Total
Democratic 4 6 10
Republican 5 7 12
Equal D/R losses (or nonpartisan chamber) 4 0 4

Impact on parties

Although the difference is marginal, the Republican Party took more of a hit from term limits in the 2012 state legislative elections than the Democratic Party, both in terms of how many individual incumbent legislators the Republican Party lost (125, versus 122 for the Democratic Party) and in terms of how many state legislative chambers lost more Republicans (12, versus 10 for the Democratic Party).

Main article: Impact of term limits on state legislative elections in 2014

Fourteen state senate chambers and thirteen state house chambers holding general elections on November 4, 2014, include some state legislators who are unable to run for re-election in 2014 because of their state's legislative term limits.

  • A total of 63 state senators are termed-out in 2014. This represents 19% of the 331 total state senate seats up for election in the 14 term-limited state senates with elections in November 2014.
  • A total of 160 state representatives are termed-out. This represents 12.7% of the 1,261 total seats up for election in the 13 term-limited states with elections in November 2014.

Altogether, 223 current state legislators must leave office after the November elections because of term limits. This is 14% of the 1,592 state legislative seats up for election in the 14 term-limited states with 2014 elections, and about 3.7% of the 6,047 state legislative seats that are up for election altogether in 2014, including the non-term-limited states.

State senators

Main article: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2014

There are 42 state senates holding general elections in November 2014. In 14 of these states, state senators are subject to term limits. Louisiana is the only state with state senate term limits that will not have a general election in 2014.

A total of 63 current state senators are ineligible to run for re-election in November because of term limit laws in their state. This includes:

  • 22 incumbent Democratic state senators
  • 24 incumbent Republican state senators
  • 17 nonpartisan state senators.

Going into the 2014 elections, the Democratic Party is the majority party in four of the 14 state senates with term limits. The Republican Party is the majority in 9 of the 14 state senates with term limits. Nebraska's state senate is term-limited and officially Non-partisan.

  • In four states, more Democrats are term-limited out than Republicans. In California, the majority party is Democratic. In Arkansas, Florida and Montana, the majority party is Republican.
  • In seven states, more Republicans are term-limited out than Democrats. In Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma and South Dakota, the majority party is Republican. In Colorado, Maine and Nevada, the majority party is Democratic.
  • In one state, Ohio, equal numbers of Republicans and Democrats are term-limited in November 2014. Heading into the election, the majority party in Ohio is Republican.
  • There are no Arizona senators affected by term-limits in 2014.

State representatives

Main article: Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2014

There are 45 state houses holding general elections in November 2014. In 13 of these states, state house terms are subject to term limits. There are 15 states with state legislative term limits, but Louisiana will not hold a state house election in 2014 and Nebraska does not have a state house.

160 current state representatives are ineligible to run for re-election in November because of term limit laws in their state. This includes:

  • 73 incumbent Democratic state representatives
  • 87 incumbent Republican state representatives

Going into the 2014 elections, the Democratic Party is the majority party in four of the 14 state senates with term limits. The Republican Party is the majority in 9 of the 14 state senates with term limits. Nebraska's state senate is term-limited and officially Non-partisan.

  • In four states, more Democrats are term-limited out than Republicans. In California, the majority party is Democratic. In Arkansas, Florida and Montana, the majority party is Republican.
  • In seven states, more Republicans are term-limited out than Democrats. In Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma and South Dakota, the majority party is Republican. In Colorado, Maine and Nevada, the majority party is Democratic.
  • In one state, Ohio, equal numbers of Republicans and Democrats are term-limited in November 2014. Heading into the election, the majority party in Ohio is Republican.
  • There are no Arizona senators affected by term-limits in 2014.

Impact on parties

Republican representatives will take a larger hit from term limits in the 2014 state legislative elections than the Democratic Party, both in terms of how many individual incumbent legislators the Republican Party will lose (113, versus 95 for the Democratic Party) and in terms of how many state legislative chambers lost more Republicans (12, versus 10 for Democrats).

Incumbents

The following table details the number of state legislators unable to run for re-election due to term limits broken down by party and chamber. Republicans, who control about 11% more seats across the country, will lose 19% more incumbents to term limits than Democrats.

Party # of termed senators # of termed representatives Total
Democratic 22 73 95
Republican 24 87 113
Non-partisan 17 0 17

Chambers

The following table details the number of chambers where one party will lose more incumbents due to term limits.

Party Senates with most losses Houses with most losses Total
Democratic 4 6 10
Republican 5 7 12
Equal D/R losses (or nonpartisan chamber) 4 0 4

See also

External links

References

  1. Chart of states with term limits from NCSL
  2. Nebraska has no lower house