Difference between revisions of "States with a full-time legislature"

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(Time spent on the job)
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The full-time [[state legislatures]] are:
 
The full-time [[state legislatures]] are:
  
* [[California State Legislature]]<ref name=holt>[http://www.dailybulletin.com/ci_13939724 ''Inland Valley Daily Bulletin'', "Part-time Legislature initiative generating buzz", December 6, 2009]</ref>
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* [[California State Legislature]]<ref name=holt>[http://www.dailybulletin.com/ci_13939724 ''Inland Valley Daily Bulletin'', "Part-time Legislature initiative generating buzz," December 6, 2009]</ref>
 
* [[Illinois State Legislature]]
 
* [[Illinois State Legislature]]
 
* [[Massachusetts State Legislature]]
 
* [[Massachusetts State Legislature]]

Latest revision as of 08:16, 21 March 2014

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Features of State Legislatures

Party dominance in state legislatures2012 Session TopicsStanding committees analysis for 2011-2012 sessionLength of terms of state representativesHow vacancies are filled in state legislaturesStates with a full-time legislatureState legislative chambers that use multi-member districtsState legislatures with term limitsComparison of state legislative salariesWhen state legislators assume office after a general electionPopulation represented by state legislatorsState constitutional articles governing state legislaturesState legislative sessionsResign-to-run laws
Nine American states have a full-time state legislature. A full-time state legislature is defined as a legislature that meets throughout the year. All other legislators are considered part-time because they only meet for a portion of the year.

The full-time state legislatures are:

Defining a full-time state legislature

Number of staffers

Dates of 2014 sessions

In general, full-time legislatures have larger staffs than other legislatures. A few exceptions to this rule are Florida and Texas, whose part-time legislatures have larger staffs than a number of full-time legislatures. This means that not all work at the State Capitol. Some states with full-time legislatures have district offices.[2]

Among all fifty states, each state averages 682 staff members. The nine full-time legislatures average 1,418 staff members each. The other 41 legislatures average 520 staff members each.[2]

Salary

See also: Comparison of state legislative salaries

When looking at salary, the National Conference of State Legislatures measures the overall salary of a legislator and not just the base salary alone. This includes per diem payments, housing allowances in-session, mileage and expense reimbursements, and other necessary payments. Also, the length of the legislative session takes into account how much a legislator is paid including factors if the legislature is called in special session which could increase a legislator's salary.[3]

Time spent on the job

When the National Conference of State Legislatures defines how much time is devoted to state legislatures, it is considered not the amount of time that is spent on the legislative floor but also other activities too. This includes committee hearings, listening sessions, constituent service, and also time spent during a campaign.[4]

The following states have legislators who devote 80% of a full time job to their legislative duties. On average, each legislator is paid $68,599 and has 9 staff members.

  • California
  • Florida
  • Illinois
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan

  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • Ohio
  • Pennsylvania
  • Wisconsin

The following states have legislators who devote 70% of a full time job to their legislative duties. On average, each legislator is paid $35,326 and has 3 staff members.

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Hawaii

  • Iowa
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maryland
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Nebraska
  • North Carolina

  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Virginia
  • Washington

The following states have legislators who devote 54% of a full time job to their legislative duties. On average, each legislator is paid $15,984 and has 1 staff members.

  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Maine
  • Mississippi
  • Montana
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire

  • New Mexico
  • North Dakota
  • Rhode Island
  • South Dakota
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • West Virginia
  • Wyoming

See also

External links

References