Steve King (Iowa)

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Steve King
Steve King.jpg
U.S. House, Iowa, District 4
Incumbent
In office
January 3, 2003-Present
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 11
PartyRepublican
PredecessorTom Latham (R)
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
First electedNovember 5, 2002
Next generalNovember 4, 2014
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
Iowa State Senate
1996-2002
Education
High schoolDenison Community High School, Denison, Iowa
Personal
BirthdayMay 28, 1949
Place of birthStorm Lake, Iowa
ProfessionBusiness Owner
Net worth$361,008
ReligionRoman Catholic
Websites
Office website
Campaign website
Steve King campaign logo
Steven Arnold "Steve" King (b. May 28, 1949, in Storm Lake, Iowa) is a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives representing Iowa's 4th congressional district. King was first elected to the House from District 5 in 2002.

King ran in the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing Iowa's 4th District due to redistricting. King ran unopposed in the Republican primary on June 5, 2012, and won the general election on November 6, 2012.[1]

King considered a run for outgoing Democratic Sen. Tom Harkin's seat in the November 4, 2014 U.S. Senate election before opting not to run.[2][3][4]

He previously was a member of the Iowa State Senate from 1996 to 2002.[5]

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, King is an average Republican member of Congress, meaning he will vote with the Republican Party on the majority of bills.

Biography

King was born in 1949 in Storm Lake, IA, and raised in Denison, IA, where he also attended high school. Although he attended Northwest Missouri State University from 1967-1970, he does not have a college degree. Prior to his political career, King worked as a businessman.[5]

Career

  • Iowa State Senate, 1996-2002
  • U.S. House of Representatives, 5th Congressional District of Iowa, 2003-Present

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2013-2014

King serves on the following committees:[6]

  • Agriculture Committee
    • Subcommittee on Department Operations, Oversight, & Nutrition (Chair)
    • Subcommittee on Livestock, Rural Development, and Credit
  • Judiciary Committee
    • Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice
    • Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security
  • United States House Committee on Small Business
    • Subcommittee on Agriculture, Energy and Trade
    • Subcommittee on Contracting and the Workforce
    • Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Tax and Capital Access
    • Subcommittee on Healthcare and Technology

2011-2012

King served on the following House committees[7]:

  • Committee on Agriculture
    • Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities & Risk Management
    • Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy & Poultry
    • Subcommittee on Horticulture & Nutrition
    • Subcommittee on Department Operations, Oversight, & Credit
  • Committee on Small Business
    • Subcommittee on Agriculture, Energy & Trade
    • Subcommittee on Healthcare & Technology
    • Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Tax & Capital Access
    • Subcommittee on Contracting & Workforce
  • Judiciary Committee
    • Subcommittee on Immigration Policy & Enforcement
    • Subcommittee on the Constitution

Issues

House Judiciary Committee

Congressman King was first appointed to the House Judiciary Committee in 2003 shortly after he was sworn into the Congress.[8] King still serves on the committee to this date.[9]

Congressman King serves as the Republican Ranking Member on the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security & International Law. Also, Congressman King serves on the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Commercial and Administrative Law and Constitution, Civil Rights & Civil Liberties.[9]

Charleston meeting

King will attend the closed-door “Charleston Meeting,” a gathering of influential national conservatives and business leaders hosted by conservative activist Mallory Factor in August 2013.[10] He will also hold an invitation-only meeting with South Carolina GOP activists in Charleston County.[10][11][12]

The Charleston Meeting and its sibling, the New York Meeting, are semi-regular events hosted by Factor that bring together influential conservative figures from around the country - not necessarily the local activists who will be key players in the state's primary, the first southern contest in the 2016 presidential nomination fight.[13]

King’s office has not yet commented on whether he is looking at a run for president, but such trips are generally only embarked on by politicians angling for a national profile and/or a potential presidential run.[10]

Controversy

Global warming a "religion"

In comments made on August 6, 2013, King dismissed the concern over global warming, labeling it a "religion" and claiming efforts to address climate change are useless.[14][15]

"It is not proven, it's not science," King said. "It's more of a religion than a science."[16][17]

The congressman spoke at a Fort Dodge event sponsored by the conservative advocacy group Americans for Prosperity.[14][16] King said he thought environmentalists should focus on the positive aspects of the earth heating up due to more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, instead of harping on the negatives.[18][14] King also argued that the push to combat climate change will harm the economy more than it will help the environment.[15]

"Everything that might result from a warmer planet is always bad in [environmentalists'] analysis," King said. "There will be more photosynthesis going on if the earth gets warmer. And if sea levels go up four or six inches, I don't know if we'd know that."

King suggested that rising sea levels are not a good measurement of the consequences of global warming. "We don't know where sea level is even, let alone be able to say that it's going to come up an inch globally because some polar ice caps might melt because there's CO2 suspended in the atmosphere," King said.[16][14]

Remarks on young undocumented workers


Steve King's July 2013 interview with Newsmax

King said in an interview with Newsmax in July 2013 that a wide swath of immigrants who were brought into the United States illegally as children were smuggling drugs into the country.[19] “Some of them are valedictorians, and their parents brought them in. It wasn’t their fault. It’s true in some cases, but they aren’t all valedictorians. They weren’t all brought in by their parents...For everyone who’s a valedictorian, there’s another 100 out there that weigh 130 pounds and they’ve got calves the size of cantaloupes because they’re hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert,” said in the interview and added, “Those people would be legalized with the same act.”[19][20]

Speaker John Boehner said in a statement on July 23, 2013 that comments from King likening young undocumented immigrants, known as DREAMers, to drug mules was “wrong.”[19] On July 25, 2013 Boehner called King's comments “deeply offensive and wrong” and added, “What he said does not reflect the values of the American people or the Republican Party.”[21] House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, the second-ranking House Republican, said of King’s remarks: ”I strongly disagree with his characterization of the children of immigrants and find the comments inexcusable.”[19]

King defended his remarks saying, “It’s not something that I’m making up. This is real. We have people that are mules, that are drug mules, that are hauling drugs across the border and you can tell by their physical characteristics what they’ve been doing for months, going through the desert with 75 pounds of drugs on their back and if those who advocate for the DREAM Act, if they choose to characterize this about valedictorians, I gave them a different image that we need to be thinking about because we just simply can’t be passing legislation looking only at one component of what would be millions of people.” [22]

Specific votes

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "No" King voted against the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was one of 151 Republicans that voted against the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257/167 vote on January 1, 2013.[23]

Policy positions

Immigration

King supports:[24]

  • Secured and controlled borders - "I believe we must tighten and strengthen our border control efforts. I have traveled to the southern border and have seen the unprotected areas that allow the free flow of illegal immigrants into our country. Allowing illegal immigration to flourish is a threat to our national security."
  • Concrete border wall - "I have seen the fences being built on the border by U.S. Customs and Border Patrol. I have watched illegal immigrants scale these fences and easily move between the United States and Mexico. To address this, I have designed a concrete border wall proposal. I have 35 years of experience in the earth-moving, drainage and concrete construction business, which gives me the background to design an effective wall. My concrete wall would function as both a human and vehicle barrier, inspired by the success of the concrete wall in Israel. My design is cost efficient, easy to construct and impenetrable. This design would funnel illegal traffic to our ports of entry, where it can be reasonably controlled by our nation's customs and border patrol agents."
  • An immigration policy designed to enhance the economic, social and cultural well-being of the United States.

King opposes:[25]

  • Amnesty - "I believe we only encourage illegal immigration by discussing amnesty for the 12-20 million illegal immigrants living in the United States today. I adamantly oppose amnesty, regardless of the guise under which it is presented. Amnesty pardons immigration lawbreakers and rewards them with the objective of their crime—citizenship."
  • "Job magnets" - "In addition to a physical deterrent, I believe we must shut off the job magnets that encourage illegal immigrants to come to the United States. I have authored New IDEA, the Illegal Deduction Elimination Act, which would protect American jobs for American workers. New IDEA would make wages and benefits paid to illegal immigrants nondeductible for federal tax purposes. This would eliminate the incentive of hiring illegal workers to employ cheap labor. New IDEA would also make E-Verify permanent and provide "safe harbor" for employers who use this employment eligibility system. My legislation would also create an information sharing system between the Internal Revenue Service, the Department of Homeland Security and the Social Security Administration. By using an automated system to verify employment authorization, and by sharing this information amongst three federal agencies, false identification documents and illegal workers will be identified more easily."
  • Incentives for illegal immigrants - "In addition to border security and workplace enforcement, our nation must eliminate needless incentives that encourage illegal immigration and cost taxpayers significant amounts of money each year. I do not believe it is in the best interest of our nation to continue tolerating the practice of illegal aliens giving birth to children in the U.S. in order to obtain citizenship for the child, then moving back to their country of origin with the hopes of achieving uninhibited access to our country for as many family members as possible."

Legislation

Elections

2014

See also: United States Senate elections in Iowa, 2014 and Iowa's 4th congressional district elections, 2014

Stutzman is set to run for re-election to the U.S. House in 2014. If he runs, he will seek the Republican nomination in the primary election.The general election takes place November 4, 2014. King considered a run for outgoing Democratic Sen. Tom Harkin's seat in the November 4, 2014 U.S. Senate election before opting not to run.[30][31][32]

King conducted after an interview with the Des Moines Register on May 1, 2013, in which he stated that he was “embarrassed” he didn’t have an answer yet about his plans to run for U.S. Senate.[33] He also commented that he never expected to still be undecided in May, saying “Things are stacking up on me so fast, I hardly have time to deal with the issue...There’s a lot of support to do this, and I just don’t know the answer. And I’m embarrassed that I don’t know the answer....I’ve just been pinned down doing my job, believe it or not. It just keeps me busy representing people in Congress," citing events pending in Congress, especially the farm bill and the immigration issue, as the primary issues receiving his attention.[33]

King announced on May 6, 2013 that he would not be running for the Senate seat.[34][35]

King is set to run for re-election to the U.S. House in 2014. If he runs, he will seek the Republican nomination in the primary election.The general election takes place November 4, 2014.

Gov. Branstad indicates preference

Gov. Terry Branstad spoke of his preference for Tom Latham to be the Republican nominee for Iowa's Senate seat at the National Governors Association on February 23, 2013.[36] Branstad said he believes Latham would be more electable statewide than fellow Representative King, who is also considering a run for the seat opened up by Harkin's retirement.[36]

Branstad also made it clear that he expects the two candidates to decide who will be running for the seat without a primary battle. “We’re not going to have a primary, and I’m going to support both of my congressmen. I just think that Latham would be the strongest candidate for the Senate at this time, and I feel confident that he would be a great vote-getter in our state.”[36]

Despite his preference for the strongest Republican nominee, Branstad has praised both candidates. He even suggested that he might support King if Sen. Chuck Grassley (R) retires in 2016 and he makes a run for his seat.[36]

Branstad summed up the situation, stating “I’ve encouraged them to talk to each other, make the decision, but I would hope that and someday I’d love to see them both in the U.S. Senate, but I think Tom Latham would be the most experienced and the strongest candidate at this time.”[36]

2012

See also: Iowa's 4th congressional district elections, 2012

King ran in the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing Iowa's 4th District. King won the nomination on the Republican ticket.[37] King ran unopposed in the Republican primary. Candidate Christie Vilsack ran unopposed in the Democratic primary. The two faced off in the general election on November 6, 2012, and King won the contest. Candidates wishing to run were required to file by the signature filing deadline of March 16, 2012. The primary elections took place on June 5, 2012.[38]

Results

U.S. House, Iowa District 4 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngSteve King Incumbent 53% 200,063
     Democratic Christie Vilsack 44.9% 169,470
     Independent Martin James Monroe 2.2% 8,124
Total Votes 377,657
Source: Iowa Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Race Background

Incumbent Steve King, who defeated 2010 opponent Matthew Campbell by over 65,200 votes, faces a considerably more difficult race in 2012. As the New York Times reports, this occurs at the same time support for tea party candidates nationwide has dwindled. In a the election's first debate, Democratic challenger Christie Vilsack asked pointed questions regarding a Farm Bill that the U.S. House failed to pass.[39]

However, Christie Vilsack faces an uphill battle in a socially conservative district. Like other Democratic candidates running in socially conservative areas, notably Jim Graves who is challenging tea-party favorite Michele Bachmann in Minnesota's 6th Congressional District, Vilsack is steering away from hot button, national issues like abortion. Instead, she is focusing on local initiatives and ways the government might assist farmers.[40]

Polls

Steve King vs. Christie Vilsack
Poll Steve King Christie VilsackDon't knowSample Size
Public Policy Polling (September 24-25, 2012)
48%45%7%577
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.

Media

Steve King's first TV ad of the election was launched on August 27, 2012.


Steve King "Land" [41]

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for King is available dating back to 2002. Based on available campaign finance records, King raised a total of $7,594,293 during that time period. This information was last updated on April 7, 2013.[47]

Steve King (Iowa)'s Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 U.S. House (Iowa, District 4) Won $3,753,859
2010 U.S. House (Iowa, District 5) Won $1,015,039
2008 U.S. House (Iowa, District 5) Won $1,023,904
2006 U.S. House (Iowa, District 5) Won $612,291
2004 U.S. House (Iowa, District 5) Won $539,970
2002 U.S. House (Iowa, District 5) Won $649,230
Grand Total Raised $7,594,293

2014

Candidates for Congress are required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are King's reports.[48]

Steve King Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[49]4/15/2013$119,193.14$108,630.54$(137,675.17)$90,148.51
July Quarterly[50]7/15/2013$90,148.51$139,715.62$(124,086.40)$105,777.73
Running totals
$248,346.16$(261,761.57)

2012

Breakdown of the source of King's campaign funds before the 2012 election.

King won re-election to the U.S. House in 2012. During that election cycle, King's campaign committee raised a total of $3,753,859 and spent $3,815,764.[51]

2010

Breakdown of the source of King's campaign funds before the 2010 election.

King won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010. During that re-election cycle, King's campaign committee raised a total of $1,015,039 and spent $1,013,945.[52]

Analysis

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, King is a "far-right Republican leader." as of June 18, 2013.[53]

Like-minded colleagues

The website Open Congress, tracks whom from each party each member of Congress votes most and least often with.[54]

King most often votes with:

King least often votes with:

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, King missed 161 of 7,661 roll call votes from Jan 2003 to Mar 2013. This amounts to 2.1%, which is worse than the median of 2.2% among current congressional representatives as of March 2013.[55]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. King paid his congressional staff a total of $967,473 in 2011. He ranked 72nd on the list of the highest paid Republican Representative Staff Salaries and he ranked 227th overall of the lowest paid Representative Staff Salaries in 2011. Overall, Iowa ranked 16th in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[56]

Staff bonuses

According to an analysis by CNN, King was one of nearly 25 percent of House members who gave their staff bonuses in 2012. King's staff was given an apparent $3,721.49 in bonus money.[57]

Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org - The Center for Responsive Politics, King's net worth as of 2011 was estimated between $156,016 and 566,000. That averages to $361,008, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican Representatives in 2011 of $7,859,232. His average net worth increased by 50.42% from 2010.[58]

2010

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org - The Center for Responsive Politics, King's net worth as of 2010 was estimated between $130,003 and $350,000. That averages to $240,001.50, which was lower than the average net worth of Republican Representatives in 2010 of $7,561,133.[59]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

2012

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. King ranked 12th in the conservative rankings in 2012.[60]

2011

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. King ranked 74th in the conservative rankings.[61]

Voting with party

2013

Steve King voted with the Republican Party 96.9% of the time, which ranked 82nd among the 233 House Republican members as of June 2013.[62]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Steve + King + Iowa + House

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

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Personal

King has been married to his wife, Marilyn (nee Kelly) since 1972. They live in Kiron, IA, and have three children and five grandchildren.[63]

External links


References

  1. Politico "2012 House Race Results"
  2. The Gazette "King keeping door open for U.S. Senate seat in 2014," November 8, 2012
  3. Washington Post "Steve King is out. The next phase of the Iowa Senate race starts now." Accessed May 25, 2013
  4. Fox News "Iowa's Steve King rules out GOP bid for Senate in 2014" Accessed May 25, 2013
  5. 5.0 5.1 Biographical Guide to Members of Congress "Steve King" Accessed November 9, 2011
  6. CQ.com, "House Committee Rosters for the 113th Congress"
  7. U.S. Congress House Clerk "House of Representatives Committee Assignments" Accessed November 9, 2011
  8. "Government Printing Office" House Judiciary Committee Members 108th Congress(See Page 2)
  9. 9.0 9.1 "Congressman Steve King" 111th Congress Committee Assignments
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 Washington Post "Steve King for president? He’s going to South Carolina" Accessed August 7, 2013
  11. Huffington Post " Steve King To Visit South Carolina, Meet With GOP Activists: Report" Accessed August 7, 2013
  12. CNN.com "First on CNN: Iowa's Steve King heading to South Carolina" Accessed August 7, 2013
  13. KCRG "Is Iowa Rep. Steve King Preparing for White House Bid?" Accessed August 7, 2013
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 Huffington Post "Steve King: Global Warming 'More Of A Religion Than A Science'" Accessed August 7, 2013
  15. 15.0 15.1 Salon.com "Steve King: Global warming “more of a religion than a science”" Accessed August 7, 2013
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 Messenger News "King: Global warming ‘not proven, not science’" Accessed August 7, 2013
  17. Mediaite "Steve King Blasts Global Warming Claims: Not ‘Everything That Results From Warmer Planet Is Always Bad’" Accessed August 7, 2013
  18. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named messengers
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 Politico "John Boehner condemns Steve King drug runner comments" Accessed July 24, 2013
  20. Des Moines Register "King suggests many undocumented immigrants carry drugs" Accessed July 24, 2013
  21. Politico "John Boehner blasts Steve King again" Accessed July 25, 2013
  22. Politico "Steve King doubles down on 'drug mules' comment" Accessed July 25, 2013
  23. U.S. House "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff" Accessed January 4, 2013.
  24. Congressman Steve King, Issues and Legislation, accessed March 12, 2012
  25. Congressman Steve King, Issues and Legislation, accessed March 12, 2012
  26. Govtrack.us, H.R. 997: English Language Unity Act of 2005, accessed March 12, 2012
  27. Open Congress, H.R.997 - English Language Unity Act of 2011, accessed March 12, 2012
  28. Congressman Steve King, Issues and Legislation, accessed March 12, 2012
  29. Open Congress, H.R.140 - Birthright Citizenship Act of 2011, accessed March 12, 2012
  30. The Gazette "King keeping door open for U.S. Senate seat in 2014," November 8, 2012
  31. Washington Post "Steve King is out. The next phase of the Iowa Senate race starts now." Accessed May 25, 2013
  32. Fox News "Iowa's Steve King rules out GOP bid for Senate in 2014" Accessed May 25, 2013
  33. 33.0 33.1 Des Moines Register "King ‘embarrassed’ to still be undecided on Senate run" Accessed May 2, 2013
  34. Washington Post "Steve King is out. The next phase of the Iowa Senate race starts now." Accessed May 25, 2013
  35. Fox News "Iowa's Steve King rules out GOP bid for Senate in 2014" Accessed May 25, 2013
  36. 36.0 36.1 36.2 36.3 36.4 Politico "Terry Branstad prefers Tom Latham for Senate race" Accessed February 25, 2013
  37. The Messenger "Vilsack launches campaign" Accessed December 16, 2011
  38. Politico "2012 Election Map"
  39. New York Times "In Iowa and Beyond, Redrawn Districts Test Favorites of Tea Party," Accessed: October 12, 2012
  40. New York Times "In Iowa and Beyond, Redrawn Districts Test Favorites of Tea Party," Accessed: October 12, 2012
  41. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWCXEgv5miE&feature=youtu.be YouTube channel]
  42. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  43. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  44. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  45. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  46. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  47. Open Secrets "Steve King" Accessed April 7, 2013
  48. Federal Election Commission "Steve King 2014 Summary reports," Accessed July 24, 2013
  49. Federal Election Commission "April Quarterly" Accessed July 25, 2013
  50. Federal Election Commission "July Quarterly" Accessed July 25, 2013
  51. http://www.opensecrets.org/politicians/summary.php?cid=N00025237&cycle=2012 Open Secrets "Steve King 2012 Election Cycle," Accessed February 20, 2013]
  52. Open Secrets "Steve King 2010 Election Cycle," Accessed November 11, 2011
  53. Gov Track "King" Accessed June 18, 2013
  54. OpenCongress, "Rep. Steve King," Accessed August 1, 2013
  55. GovTrack, "Steve King," Accessed April 1, 2013
  56. LegiStorm "Steve King"
  57. CNN Politics, "Congressional bonuses in a time of cuts," accessed March 8, 2013
  58. OpenSecrets.org, "King (R-Iowa), 2011"
  59. OpenSecrets.org, "King, (R-Iowa), 2010"
  60. National Journal, "2012 Congressional Vote Ratings," February 28, 2013
  61. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," February 23, 2012
  62. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  63. Official House Site "Biography," Accessed November 9, 2011
Political offices
Preceded by
Tom Latham (R)
U.S. House of Representatives - Iowa District 4
2013-Present
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
U.S. House of Representatives - Iowa District 5
2003–2013
Succeeded by
Now defunct