Vote button trans.png
April's Project of the Month
It's spring time. It's primary election season!
Click here to find all the information you'll need to cast your ballot.




Difference between revisions of "Supermajority requirement"

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(Enact state budgets)
Line 8: Line 8:
 
==Enact state budgets==
 
==Enact state budgets==
  
Several states require a supermajority vote to pass their state's budget, including [[California]].
+
Several states require a supermajority vote to pass their state's budget:
 +
 
 +
* [[Arkansas]].  75% of the [[Arkansas State Legislature]] must vote in favor of the state's budget for it to pass.
 +
* [[California]].  In California, 2/3rds of the [[California State Legislature]] must vote in favor for a budget to be enacted. [[California Proposition 25, Majority Vote for Legislature to Pass the Budget (2010)|Proposition 25]] on the [[California 2010 ballot propositions|November 2, 2010 ballot]] might overturn this requirement.
 +
* [[Rhode Island]]. In California, 2/3rds of the [[Rhode Island State Legislature]] must vote in favor for a budget to be enacted.<ref>[http://articles.sfgate.com/2010-09-19/opinion/24011476_1_budget-requirement-for-tax-increases-supermajority ''San Francisco Chronicle'', "San Francisco Chronicle editorial: Yes on Prop. 25, No on Prop. 26", September 19, 2010]</ref>
 +
 
 +
==Tax increases==
 +
 
 +
Voters in the [[Washington|State of Washington]] passed [[Washington Legislative Supermajority or Voter Approval Required for Tax Increase, Initiative 960 (2007)|I-960]] in 2007, which imposed a 2/3rds requirement on the [[Washington State Legislature]] for tax increases.  The state legislature overturned this initiative through the process known as [[legislative tampering]] and its supporters then qualified [[Washington Tax Initiative, Initiative 1053 (2010)|I-1053]] for the state's 2010 ballot.
  
 
==Referred amendments==
 
==Referred amendments==

Revision as of 09:51, 26 September 2010

A supermajority requirement is a requirement in some votes and elections where more than a simple majority of those voting must vote in favor of a proposal in order for it to be considered to have been approved.

Examples of supermajority requirements:

Enact state budgets

Several states require a supermajority vote to pass their state's budget:

Tax increases

Voters in the State of Washington passed I-960 in 2007, which imposed a 2/3rds requirement on the Washington State Legislature for tax increases. The state legislature overturned this initiative through the process known as legislative tampering and its supporters then qualified I-1053 for the state's 2010 ballot.

Referred amendments

Constitutional conventions

See also


Cite error: <ref> tags exist, but no <references/> tag was found