Talk:Legislatively-referred constitutional amendment

From Ballotpedia
Revision as of 12:09, 6 June 2012 by BaileyL (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
BallotLaw final.png
This page is part of WikiProject Law, a WikiProject dedicated to articles related to laws governing ballot measures, recall and elections. To participate: join (or just read up) at the project page.

Ballotpedia's Ballot Measures project is managed by Brittany Clingen.

If you have any questions or comments please e-mail brittany.clingen@ballotpedia.org.

StateConstitutions Ballotpedia.jpg
This page is part of WikiProject State Constitutions, a WikiProject dedicated to articles related to state constitutions. Join or read more at the project page.

If you have any questions, comments or would like to volunteer on this project please e-mail editor@ballotpedia.org.

BallotMeasureFinal badge.png


This page is part of WikiProject State Ballot Measures, a WikiProject including articles about:

To participate: join (or just read up) at the project page.


Ballotpedia's Ballot Measures project is managed by Brittany Clingen.

If you have any questions or comments please e-mail brittany.clingen@ballotpedia.org.

Number of legislative sessions

One legislative session

36 states permit an amendment to be submitted to the state's voters after one passage through the legislature. These states vary with respect to the percentage of the vote required in the legislature to place an amendment on the ballot.

Two successive sessions

Eleven states require that proposed amendments be approved in two successive sessions of the legislature, often with the requirement that a state legislative election intervene between the two times the amendment is considered in the legislature.

  • Tennessee. As established in Section 3, Article XI a proposed amendment must be approved in two successive sessions of the Tennessee General Assembly. In the first session, a majority of the members of both houses must approve it. In the second session, a "two-thirds of all the members elected to each house" must approve of it.
This discussion page has been protected from further postings.