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Difference between revisions of "Template:Ex lawmakers lobbying positions"

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There are no restrictions, however, on providing behind-the-scenes advice to corporations and others seeking to shape federal legislation.<ref name="usa"/> Ex-lawmakers can immediately lobby the executive branch and officials in state and local governments.<ref name="usa"/> Many former lawmakers are taking advantage of this slight distinction, and are taking positions after their political careers end as consultants and strategists.<ref name="usa"/>
 
There are no restrictions, however, on providing behind-the-scenes advice to corporations and others seeking to shape federal legislation.<ref name="usa"/> Ex-lawmakers can immediately lobby the executive branch and officials in state and local governments.<ref name="usa"/> Many former lawmakers are taking advantage of this slight distinction, and are taking positions after their political careers end as consultants and strategists.<ref name="usa"/>
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<noinclude>[[Category:Congress templates]]</noinclude>

Revision as of 17:47, 20 December 2013

{{{Name}}} was listed in March 2013 by USA Today as one of 16 former lawmakers who took on a lobbying related position after leaving office.[1] Sixteen of the 98 total lawmakers who have retired or were ousted by voters since January 2011 hold lobbying-related jobs.[1] USA Today looked at lawmakers who retired, resigned or lost their seats in the last Congress — along with the handful who left their posts during the first months of the new Congress.[1]

Despite rules in place to prevent the constant rotation of lawmakers into lobbying positions, many former lawmakers are entering into positions with either lobbying firms or trade associations.[1] Former House members are barred from lobbying their former colleagues for a year, and former senators, are barred for two years.[1]

There are no restrictions, however, on providing behind-the-scenes advice to corporations and others seeking to shape federal legislation.[1] Ex-lawmakers can immediately lobby the executive branch and officials in state and local governments.[1] Many former lawmakers are taking advantage of this slight distinction, and are taking positions after their political careers end as consultants and strategists.[1]
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