Difference between revisions of "Template:Ex lawmakers lobbying positions"

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{{{Name}}} was listed in March 2013 by ''USA Today'' as 1 of 16 former lawmakers who took on a lobbying related position after leaving office.<ref name="usa"/> Sixteen of the 98 total lawmakers who have retired or were ousted by voters since January 2011 hold lobbying-related jobs.<ref name="usa"/> ''USA Today'' looked at lawmakers who retired, resigned or lost their seats in the last Congress — along with the handful who left their posts during the first months of the new [[113th United States Congress|Congress]].<ref name="usa"/>
 
{{{Name}}} was listed in March 2013 by ''USA Today'' as 1 of 16 former lawmakers who took on a lobbying related position after leaving office.<ref name="usa"/> Sixteen of the 98 total lawmakers who have retired or were ousted by voters since January 2011 hold lobbying-related jobs.<ref name="usa"/> ''USA Today'' looked at lawmakers who retired, resigned or lost their seats in the last Congress — along with the handful who left their posts during the first months of the new [[113th United States Congress|Congress]].<ref name="usa"/>
  
Despite rules in place to prevent the constant rotation of lawmakers into lobbying positions, many former lawmakers are entering into positions with either lobbying firms or trade associations.<ref name="usa">[http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2013/03/25/former-lawmakers-lobbying-jobs/2011325/ ''USA Today'' "Former lawmakers lobbying jobs" Accessed March 27, 2013]</ref> Former [[U.S. House|House]] members are barred from lobbying their former colleagues for a year, and former [[U.S. Senate|senators]], are barred for two years.<ref name="usa"/>  
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Despite rules in place to prevent the constant rotation of lawmakers into lobbying positions, many former lawmakers are entering into positions with either lobbying firms or trade associations.<ref name="usa">[http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2013/03/25/former-lawmakers-lobbying-jobs/2011325/ ''USA Today'' "Former lawmakers lobbying jobs" accessed March 27, 2013]</ref> Former [[U.S. House|House]] members are barred from lobbying their former colleagues for a year, and former [[U.S. Senate|senators]], are barred for two years.<ref name="usa"/>  
  
 
There are no restrictions, however, on providing behind-the-scenes advice to corporations and others seeking to shape federal legislation.<ref name="usa"/> Ex-lawmakers can immediately lobby the executive branch and officials in state and local governments.<ref name="usa"/> Many former lawmakers are taking advantage of this slight distinction, and are taking positions after their political careers end as consultants and strategists.<ref name="usa"/>
 
There are no restrictions, however, on providing behind-the-scenes advice to corporations and others seeking to shape federal legislation.<ref name="usa"/> Ex-lawmakers can immediately lobby the executive branch and officials in state and local governments.<ref name="usa"/> Many former lawmakers are taking advantage of this slight distinction, and are taking positions after their political careers end as consultants and strategists.<ref name="usa"/>
  
 
<noinclude>[[Category:Congress templates]]</noinclude>
 
<noinclude>[[Category:Congress templates]]</noinclude>

Revision as of 15:41, 24 February 2014

{{{Name}}} was listed in March 2013 by USA Today as 1 of 16 former lawmakers who took on a lobbying related position after leaving office.[1] Sixteen of the 98 total lawmakers who have retired or were ousted by voters since January 2011 hold lobbying-related jobs.[1] USA Today looked at lawmakers who retired, resigned or lost their seats in the last Congress — along with the handful who left their posts during the first months of the new Congress.[1]

Despite rules in place to prevent the constant rotation of lawmakers into lobbying positions, many former lawmakers are entering into positions with either lobbying firms or trade associations.[1] Former House members are barred from lobbying their former colleagues for a year, and former senators, are barred for two years.[1]

There are no restrictions, however, on providing behind-the-scenes advice to corporations and others seeking to shape federal legislation.[1] Ex-lawmakers can immediately lobby the executive branch and officials in state and local governments.[1] Many former lawmakers are taking advantage of this slight distinction, and are taking positions after their political careers end as consultants and strategists.[1]
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