Difference between revisions of "Template:Iagovbackground2014"

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[[Democratic]] State Rep. [[Tyler Olson]] declared his candidacy for governor in July 2013 and was considered a strong contender for the party's nomination before withdrawing from the race in December of that year.<ref name=withdrew/> He decided to drop out following the announcement of his separation from wife Sarah Olson, who had been an instrumental part of his family-oriented campaign.<ref>[http://tylerolson.org/ ''Tyler Olson for Governor 2014,'' "Homepage," accessed July 11, 2013]</ref> <ref>[http://www.desmoinesregister.com/article/20131216/NEWS09/312160114/Iowa-Poll-Iowans-widely-approve-state-s-direction-Branstad-s-performance/ ''The Des Moines-Register,'' "Iowa Poll: Iowans widely approve of state's direction, Branstad's performance," December 16, 2013]</ref> Olson's withdrawal was followed soon thereafter by former state Sen. Bob Krause's announcement he was shutting down his campaign. The absence of these two contenders is expected to clear the path for [[Jack Hatch]], the most viable Democratic candidate remaining in the primary field, to take on Branstad in the general election; Krause immediately gave Hatch his support, while Olson noticeably declined to endorse Hatch upon dropping out of the race.<ref name=withdrew/><ref>[http://blogs.desmoinesregister.com/dmr/index.php/2014/01/02/krause-ends-bid-for-governor-endorses-fellow-democrat-hatch/article ''The Desmoines-Register,'' "Krause ends bid for governor, endorses fellow Democrat Hatch," January 2, 2013]</ref>
 
[[Democratic]] State Rep. [[Tyler Olson]] declared his candidacy for governor in July 2013 and was considered a strong contender for the party's nomination before withdrawing from the race in December of that year.<ref name=withdrew/> He decided to drop out following the announcement of his separation from wife Sarah Olson, who had been an instrumental part of his family-oriented campaign.<ref>[http://tylerolson.org/ ''Tyler Olson for Governor 2014,'' "Homepage," accessed July 11, 2013]</ref> <ref>[http://www.desmoinesregister.com/article/20131216/NEWS09/312160114/Iowa-Poll-Iowans-widely-approve-state-s-direction-Branstad-s-performance/ ''The Des Moines-Register,'' "Iowa Poll: Iowans widely approve of state's direction, Branstad's performance," December 16, 2013]</ref> Olson's withdrawal was followed soon thereafter by former state Sen. Bob Krause's announcement he was shutting down his campaign. The absence of these two contenders is expected to clear the path for [[Jack Hatch]], the most viable Democratic candidate remaining in the primary field, to take on Branstad in the general election; Krause immediately gave Hatch his support, while Olson noticeably declined to endorse Hatch upon dropping out of the race.<ref name=withdrew/><ref>[http://blogs.desmoinesregister.com/dmr/index.php/2014/01/02/krause-ends-bid-for-governor-endorses-fellow-democrat-hatch/article ''The Desmoines-Register,'' "Krause ends bid for governor, endorses fellow Democrat Hatch," January 2, 2013]</ref>
  
Before Olson withdrew his bid, [[Template:Iagovpolls14|two polls]] were released that showed Branstad in excellent standing for wining re-election in 2014. These surveys put Branstad leading by an average 20 percentage points in hypothetical general election match-ups.<ref>[http://www.desmoinesregister.com/article/20131216/NEWS09/312160114/Iowa-Poll-Iowans-widely-approve-state-s-direction-Branstad-s-performance/ ''The Des Moines-Register,'' "Iowa Poll: Iowans widely approve of state's direction, Branstad's performance," December 16, 2013]</ref> Former state Sen. [[BboBranstad looked considerably less secure around the time Olson entered the race back in July 2013, with only 43% of polled voters saying they believed Branstad deserved to be re-elected and 54% answering that he has held office long enough, even though 51% approved of his performance. December's numbers from Quinnipiac University gave him a boost of eight percentage points in both approval rating and "deserves to be re-elected."<ref>[http://www.quinnipiac.edu/institutes-and-centers/polling-institute/iowa/release-detail?ReleaseID=1925 ''Quinnipiac University,'' Iowa Voters Like Gov. Branstad, But Say It's Time To Go, Quinnipiac University Poll Finds; Possible 2014 Challengers Are Largely Unknown, July 19, 2013]</ref><ref>[http://www.quinnipiac.edu/images/polling/ia/ia12172013_47gbnw.pdf ''Quinnipiac University Poll,'' "December 17, 2013 - Iowa Gov's Approval, Reelection Prospects Improve, Quinnipiac University Poll Finds; Christie Tops Clinton By 5 Points In 2016 Race," December 17, 2013]</ref>
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Before Olson withdrew his bid, [[Template:Iagovpolls14|two polls]] were released that showed Branstad in excellent standing for wining re-election in 2014. These surveys put Branstad leading by an average 20 percentage points in hypothetical general election match-ups.<ref>[http://www.desmoinesregister.com/article/20131216/NEWS09/312160114/Iowa-Poll-Iowans-widely-approve-state-s-direction-Branstad-s-performance/ ''The Des Moines-Register,'' "Iowa Poll: Iowans widely approve of state's direction, Branstad's performance," December 16, 2013]</ref> Branstad looked considerably less secure around the time Olson entered the race back in July 2013, with only 43% of polled voters saying they believed Branstad deserved to be re-elected and 54% answering that he has held office long enough, even though 51% approved of his performance. December's numbers from Quinnipiac University gave him a boost of eight percentage points in both approval and "deserves to be re-elected" categories.<ref>[http://www.quinnipiac.edu/institutes-and-centers/polling-institute/iowa/release-detail?ReleaseID=1925 ''Quinnipiac University,'' Iowa Voters Like Gov. Branstad, But Say It's Time To Go, Quinnipiac University Poll Finds; Possible 2014 Challengers Are Largely Unknown, July 19, 2013]</ref><ref>[http://www.quinnipiac.edu/images/polling/ia/ia12172013_47gbnw.pdf ''Quinnipiac University Poll,'' "December 17, 2013 - Iowa Gov's Approval, Reelection Prospects Improve, Quinnipiac University Poll Finds; Christie Tops Clinton By 5 Points In 2016 Race," December 17, 2013]</ref>
  
  
  
 
<noinclude>{{reflist}}[[Category:2014 SEO race background templates]]</noinclude>
 
<noinclude>{{reflist}}[[Category:2014 SEO race background templates]]</noinclude>

Revision as of 09:59, 6 January 2014

Race background

Republican incumbent Terry Branstad is set to run for re-election to a sixth non-consecutive term as governor in 2014. Branstad served in the position from 1983 to 1999, and then came out of political retirement to win the 2010 gubernatorial election, becoming Iowa's longest serving governor as well as the longest serving governor in U.S. History.[1] If and when he formally enters the race, Branstad will seek the Republican nomination in the primary on June 3, 2014, alongside running-mate and current Lieutenant Governor Kim Reynolds.

Democratic State Rep. Tyler Olson declared his candidacy for governor in July 2013 and was considered a strong contender for the party's nomination before withdrawing from the race in December of that year.[2] He decided to drop out following the announcement of his separation from wife Sarah Olson, who had been an instrumental part of his family-oriented campaign.[3] [4] Olson's withdrawal was followed soon thereafter by former state Sen. Bob Krause's announcement he was shutting down his campaign. The absence of these two contenders is expected to clear the path for Jack Hatch, the most viable Democratic candidate remaining in the primary field, to take on Branstad in the general election; Krause immediately gave Hatch his support, while Olson noticeably declined to endorse Hatch upon dropping out of the race.[2][5]

Before Olson withdrew his bid, two polls were released that showed Branstad in excellent standing for wining re-election in 2014. These surveys put Branstad leading by an average 20 percentage points in hypothetical general election match-ups.[6] Branstad looked considerably less secure around the time Olson entered the race back in July 2013, with only 43% of polled voters saying they believed Branstad deserved to be re-elected and 54% answering that he has held office long enough, even though 51% approved of his performance. December's numbers from Quinnipiac University gave him a boost of eight percentage points in both approval and "deserves to be re-elected" categories.[7][8]