Difference between revisions of "Template:Pew cost-benefit study"

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[[File:Pew cost-benefit study map.png|thumb|right|350px|Map showing results of the Pew-MacArthur cost-benefit study.|link=Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative Cost-Benefit Study]]
 
[[File:Pew cost-benefit study map.png|thumb|right|350px|Map showing results of the Pew-MacArthur cost-benefit study.|link=Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative Cost-Benefit Study]]
The ''Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative'' released a report in July 2013 which indicated that cost-benefit analysis in policymaking led to more effective uses of public funds. Looking at data from 2008 through 2011, the study's authors found that some states were more likely to use cost-benefit analysis while others were facing challenges and lagging behind the rest of the nation. Among the challenges states faced were a lack of time, money and technical skills needed to conduct comprehensive cost-benefit analyses. {{#switch: {{{Rank|}}}|Best='''{{{State}}}''' was one of the 10 states that used cost-benefit analysis more than the rest of the states with respect to determining return on investment regarding state programs. In addition, these states were more likely to use cost-benefit analysis with respect to large budget areas and when making policy decisions.|Worst='''{{{State}}}''' was one of 11 states that made rare use of cost-benefit analyses in policy and budget processes.|Middle='''{{{State}}}''' was one of 29 states with mixed results regarding the frequency and effectiveness in its use of cost-benefit analysis.}}<ref name="report">[http://www.pewstates.org/research/reports/states-use-of-cost-benefit-analysis-85899490452 ''Pew Charitable Trusts,'' "States’ Use of Cost-Benefit Analysis," July 29, 2013]</ref><noinclude>{{reflist}}[[Category:Multi-project]][[Category:Unique content pages templates]]</noinclude>
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The ''Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative'' released a report in July 2013 which indicated that cost-benefit analysis in policymaking led to more effective uses of public funds. Looking at data from 2008 through 2011, the study's authors found that some states were more likely to use cost-benefit analysis while others were facing challenges and lagging behind the rest of the nation. Among the challenges states faced were a lack of time, money and technical skills needed to conduct comprehensive cost-benefit analyses. {{#switch: {{{Rank|}}}|Best='''{{{State}}}''' was one of the 10 states that used cost-benefit analysis more than the rest of the states with respect to determining return on investment regarding state programs. In addition, these states were more likely to use cost-benefit analysis with respect to large budget areas and when making policy decisions.|Worst='''{{{State}}}''' was one of 11 states that made rare use of cost-benefit analyses in policy and budget processes.|Middle='''{{{State}}}''' was one of 29 states with mixed results regarding the frequency and effectiveness in its use of cost-benefit analysis.}}<ref name="report">[http://www.pewtrusts.org/~/media/Imported-and-Legacy/uploadedfiles/pcs_assets/2013/PewResultsFirst50statereportpdf.pdf ''Pew Charitable Trusts,'' "States’ Use of Cost-Benefit Analysis," July 29, 2013]</ref><noinclude>{{reflist}}[[Category:Multi-project]][[Category:Unique content pages templates]]</noinclude>

Revision as of 11:54, 14 July 2014

Map showing results of the Pew-MacArthur cost-benefit study.
The Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative released a report in July 2013 which indicated that cost-benefit analysis in policymaking led to more effective uses of public funds. Looking at data from 2008 through 2011, the study's authors found that some states were more likely to use cost-benefit analysis while others were facing challenges and lagging behind the rest of the nation. Among the challenges states faced were a lack of time, money and technical skills needed to conduct comprehensive cost-benefit analyses. [1]