Tennessee's 2nd Congressional District

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The 2nd Congressional District of Tennessee is a congressional district located in the central and eastern region of the state.

Tennessee's 2nd Congressional District is located in the northeastern portion of the state and includes Claiborne, Knox, Jefferson, Blout and Loudon counties.[1]

The district previously was based in the city of Knoxville and surrounding suburbs, including Powell, Farragut and Maryville.

The current representative of the 2nd congressional district is John J. Duncan, Jr. (R).

Elections

2012

See also: Tennessee's 2nd congressional district elections, 2012

The 2nd congressional district of Tennessee held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent John J. Duncan, Jr. won re-election in the district.[2]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 2 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Troy Goodale 20.6% 54,522
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn J. Duncan, Jr. Incumbent 74.4% 196,894
     Green Norris Dryer 2.2% 5,733
     Independent Brandon Stewart 1.1% 2,974
     Libertarian Greg Samples 1.7% 4,382
Total Votes 264,505
Source: Tennessee Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, John Duncan, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Dave Hancock (D) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 2 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Duncan, Jr. incumbent 84.8% 141,796
     Democratic Dave Hancock 15.2% 25,400
Total Votes 167,196

2008
On November 4, 2008, John Duncan, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Bob Scott (D) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 2 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Duncan, Jr. incumbent 78.1% 227,120
     Democratic Bob Scott 21.9% 63,639
Total Votes 290,759

2006
On November 7, 2006, John Duncan, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated John Green (D) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 2 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Duncan, Jr. incumbent 77.7% 157,095
     Democratic John Green 22.3% 45,025
Total Votes 202,120

2004
On November 2, 2004, John Duncan, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated John Green (D) and Charles E. Howard (I) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 2 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Duncan, Jr. incumbent 79.1% 215,795
     Democratic John Green 19.1% 52,155
     Independent Charles E. Howard 1.8% 4,978
Total Votes 272,928

2002
On November 5, 2002, John Duncan, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated John Green (D), Joshua Williamson (I) and George Njezic (I) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 2 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Duncan, Jr. incumbent 79% 146,887
     Democratic John Green 19.9% 37,035
     Independent Joshua Williamson 0.6% 1,110
     Independent George Njezic 0.5% 940
     N/A Write-in 0% 9
Total Votes 185,981

2000
On November 7, 2000, John Duncan, Jr. won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Kevin J. Rowland (L) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 2 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Duncan, Jr. incumbent 89.3% 187,154
     Libertarian Kevin J. Rowland 10.6% 22,304
     N/A Write-in 0% 27
Total Votes 209,485

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 2nd congressional district prior to the 2010 redistricting.
See also: Redistricting in Tennessee

The T.N. Legislature is expected to soon vote on the GOP-proposed new congressional map. Tennessee did not lose or gain any seats in the redistricting process. [9]

External links

See also

References