Tennessee's 8th Congressional District

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The 8th Congressional District of Tennessee is a congressional district located in the northwestern region of the state.

The 8th District is located in the northwest region of Tennessee and borders Kentucky, Missouri and Arkansas. Henry, Carroll, Weakley, Obion, Lake, Dyer, Crockett, Gibson, Madison, Haywood, Lauderdale, Tipton, Fayette and Shelby counties are included in the district.[1]

The district previously included the cities of Jackson, Clarksville, Union City, Brownsville, and Millington. Historically, the district has leaned heavily Democratic.

The current representative of the 8th congressional district is Stephen Lee Fincher (R).

Elections

2012

See also: Tennessee's 8th congressional district elections, 2012

The 8th congressional district of Tennessee held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent Stephen Lee Fincher won re-election in the district.[2]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 8 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Timothy Dixon 28.4% 79,490
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngStephen Lee Fincher Incumbent 68.3% 190,923
     Independent James Hart 2.2% 6,139
     Independent Mark Rawles 1% 2,870
Total Votes 279,422
Source: Tennessee Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Stephen Fincher won election to the United States House. He defeated Roy Herron (D) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 8 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngStephen Fincher 60.3% 98,759
     Democratic Roy Herron 39.7% 64,960
Total Votes 163,719

2008
On November 4, 2008, John S. Tanner won re-election to the United States House. He defeated James Hart (Write-in) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 8 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn S. Tanner incumbent 100% 180,465
     Write-in James Hart 0% 54
Total Votes 180,519

2006
On November 7, 2006, John S. Tanner won re-election to the United States House. He defeated John Farmer (R) and James Hart (I) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 8 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn S. Tanner incumbent 73.2% 129,610
     Republican John Farmer 26.8% 47,492
     Independent James Hart 0% 6
Total Votes 177,108

2004
On November 2, 2004, John S. Tanner won re-election to the United States House. He defeated James L. Hart (R) and Dennis Bertrand (Write-in) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 8 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn S. Tanner incumbent 74.3% 173,623
     Republican James L. Hart 25.6% 59,853
     Independent Dennis Bertrand 0% 91
Total Votes 233,567

2002
On November 5, 2002, John S. Tanner won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Mat McClain (R), James L. Hart (I) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 8 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn S. Tanner incumbent 70.1% 117,811
     Republican Mat McClain 27.3% 45,853
     Independent James L. Hart 2.6% 4,288
     N/A Write-in 0% 18
Total Votes 167,970

2000
On November 7, 2000, John S. Tanner won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Billy Yancy (R) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Tennessee District 8 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn S. Tanner incumbent 72.3% 143,127
     Republican Billy Yancy 27.7% 54,929
     N/A Write-in 0% 24
Total Votes 198,080

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 8th congressional district prior to the 2010 redistricting.
See also: Redistricting in Tennessee

The T.N. Legislature is expected to soon vote on the GOP-proposed new congressional map. Tennessee did not lose or gain any seats in the redistricting process. [9]

External links

See also

References