Texas' 16th Congressional District

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Texas' 16th congressional district
Current incumbentBeto O'Rourke Democratic Party
Population707,375
Gender51.3% Female, 48.7% Male
Race80.9% White, 3.8% Black, 1.2% Asian
Ethnicity79.3% Hispanic
Unemployment7.7%
Median household income$41,434
High school graduation rate76.4%
College graduation rate22.6%
Texas' 16th Congressional District is located in the far western portion of the state and includes part of El Paso county.[1]

The district previously served El Paso and the surrounding area in the state of Texas.

The current representative of the 16th congressional district is Beto O'Rourke (D).

Elections

2012

See also: Texas' 16th congressional district elections, 2012

The 16th congressional district of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012, in which Beto O'Rourke (D) won. He defeated Barbara Carrasco (R) and Junart Sodoy (L) in the general election.[2]

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngBeto O'Rourke 65.4% 101,403
     Republican Barbara Carrasco 32.9% 51,043
     Libertarian Junart Sodoy 1.7% 2,559
Total Votes 155,005
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Tim Besco (R), Bill Collins (L) and Tim Collins (Write-in) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes incumbent 58.1% 49,301
     Republican Tim Besco 36.6% 31,051
     Libertarian Bill Collins 5.1% 4,319
     Write-in Tim Collins 0.3% 221
Total Votes 84,892

2008
On November 4, 2008, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Benjamin Eloy Mendoza (I) and Mette Baker (L) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes incumbent 82.1% 130,375
     Independent Benjamin Eloy Mendoza 10.3% 16,348
     Libertarian Mette Baker 7.6% 12,000
Total Votes 158,723

2006
On November 7, 2006, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Gordon Strickland (L) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes incumbent 78.7% 61,116
     Libertarian Gordon Strickland 21.3% 16,572
Total Votes 77,688

2004
On November 2, 2004, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the United States House. He defeated David Brigham (R) and Brad Clardy (L) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes incumbent 67.5% 108,577
     Republican David Brigham 31.1% 49,972
     Libertarian Brad Clardy 1.4% 2,224
Total Votes 160,773

2002
On November 5, 2002, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the United States House. He ran unopposed in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes incumbent 100% 72,383
Total Votes 72,383

2000
On November 7, 2000, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Daniel Power (R) and Dan Moser (L) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes incumbent 68.3% 92,649
     Republican Daniel Power 30.2% 40,921
     Libertarian Dan Moser 1.5% 2,080
Total Votes 135,650

1998
On November 3, 1998, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Stu Nance (L) and Lorenzo Morales (I) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes incumbent 87.9% 67,486
     Libertarian Stu Nance 6.9% 5,329
     Independent Lorenzo Morales 5.1% 3,952
Total Votes 76,767

1996
On November 5, 1996, Silvestre Reyes won election to the United States House. He defeated Rick Ledesma (R) and Carl Proffer (Natural Law) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes 70.6% 90,260
     Republican Rick Ledesma 27.6% 35,271
     Natural Law Carl Proffer 1.8% 2,253
Total Votes 127,784

1994
On November 8, 1994, Ronald Coleman won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Bobby Ortiz (R) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRonald Coleman incumbent 57.1% 49,815
     Republican Bobby Ortiz 42.9% 37,409
Total Votes 87,224

1992
On November 3, 1992, Ronald Coleman won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Chip Taberski (R) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRonald Coleman incumbent 51.9% 66,731
     Republican Chip Taberski 48.1% 61,870
Total Votes 128,601

1990
On November 6, 1990, Ronald Coleman won re-election to the United States House. He defeated William Burgett (Write-in) in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 1990
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRonald Coleman incumbent 95.6% 62,455
     Write-in William Burgett 4.4% 2,854
Total Votes 65,309

Redistricting

The 16th Congressional District of Texas, prior to the 2010-2011 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas was redistricted in 2011. The controversial map approved by the Texas Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Perry has been appealed, and the case has been taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court.[14]

External links

See also

References

  1. Texas Redistricting Map, "Map," accessed July 24, 2012
  2. Politico "2012 Election Map, Texas"
  3. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  4. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  5. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  6. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  7. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  8. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  9. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  10. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1990," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. Washington Times "High court to ponder Texas redistricting," Accessed December 14, 2011