Texas' 17th Congressional District

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Texas' 17th congressional district
Current incumbentBill Flores Republican Party
Population710,793
Gender50.7% Female, 49.3% Male
Race76.0% White, 13.4% Black, 3.8% Asian
Ethnicity22.9% Hispanic
Unemployment8.3%
Median household income$41,989
High school graduation rate85.7%
College graduation rate26.9%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
Texas' 17th Congressional District is located in the central portion of the state and includes part of Travis and Lee counties.[1]

The district previously stretched from south of Tarrant to Grimes County.

The current representative of the 17th congressional district is Bill Flores (R).

Elections

2012

See also: Texas' 17th congressional district elections, 2012

The 17th congressional district of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012, in which incumbent Bill Flores (R) won re-election. He defeated Ben Easton (L) in the general election.[2]

U.S. House, Texas District 17 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngBill Flores Incumbent 79.9% 143,284
     Libertarian Ben Easton 20.1% 35,978
Total Votes 179,262
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Bill Flores won election to the United States House. He defeated Chet Edwards (D) and Richard Kelly (L) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Texas District 17 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngBill Flores 61.8% 106,696
     Democratic Chet Edwards incumbent 36.6% 63,138
     Libertarian Richard Kelly 1.6% 2,808
Total Votes 172,642

2008
On November 4, 2008, Chet Edwards won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Rob Curnock (R) and Gardner Osborne (L) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Texas District 17 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngChet Edwards incumbent 53% 134,592
     Republican Rob Curnock 45.5% 115,581
     Libertarian Gardner Osborne 1.5% 3,849
Total Votes 254,022

2006
On November 7, 2006, Chet Edwards won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Van Taylor (R) and Guillermo Acosta (L) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Texas District 17 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngChet Edwards incumbent 58.1% 92,478
     Republican Van Taylor 40.3% 64,142
     Libertarian Guillermo Acosta 1.6% 2,504
Total Votes 159,124

2004
On November 2, 2004, Chet Edwards won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Arlene Wohlgemuth (R) and Clyde Garland (L) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Texas District 17 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngChet Edwards incumbent 51.2% 125,309
     Republican Arlene Wohlgemuth 47.4% 116,049
     Libertarian Clyde Garland 1.4% 3,390
Total Votes 244,748

2002
On November 5, 2002, Charles Stenholm won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Rob Beckham (R) and Fred Jones (L) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Texas District 17 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCharles Stenholm incumbent 51.4% 84,136
     Republican Rob Beckham 47.4% 77,622
     Libertarian Fred Jones 1.2% 2,046
Total Votes 163,804

2000
On November 7, 2000, Charles Stenholm won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Darrell Clements (R), Debra Monde (L) and Pete Juila (Write-in) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Texas District 17 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCharles Stenholm incumbent 59% 120,670
     Republican Darrell Clements 35.5% 72,535
     Libertarian Debra Monde 5.5% 11,180
     Write-in Pete Juila 0% 45
Total Votes 204,430

1998
On November 3, 1998, Charles Stenholm won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Rudy Izzard (R) and Gordon Mobley (L) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Texas District 17 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCharles Stenholm incumbent 53.6% 75,367
     Republican Rudy Izzard 45.3% 63,700
     Libertarian Gordon Mobley 1.2% 1,618
Total Votes 140,685

1996
On November 5, 1996, Charles Stenholm won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Rudy Izzard (R) and Richard Caro (Natural Law) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Texas District 17 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCharles Stenholm incumbent 51.6% 99,678
     Republican Rudy Izzard 47.4% 91,429
     Natural Law Richard Caro 1% 1,887
Total Votes 192,994

1994
On November 8, 1994, Charles Stenholm won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Phil Boone (R) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Texas District 17 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCharles Stenholm incumbent 53.7% 83,497
     Republican Phil Boone 46.3% 72,108
Total Votes 155,605

1992
On November 3, 1992, Charles Stenholm won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Jeannie Sadowski (R) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Texas District 17 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCharles Stenholm incumbent 66.1% 136,213
     Republican Jeannie Sadowski 33.9% 69,958
Total Votes 206,171

1990
On November 6, 1990, Charles Stenholm won re-election to the United States House. He ran unopposed in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, Texas District 17 General Election, 1990
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCharles Stenholm incumbent 100% 104,100
Total Votes 104,100

Redistricting

The 17th Congressional District of Texas, prior to the 2010-2011 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas was redistricted in 2011. The controversial map approved by the Texas Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Perry has been appealed, and the case has been taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court.[14]

External links

See also

References