Texas' 1st Congressional District

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Texas' 1st congressional district
Current incumbentLouie Gohmert Republican Party
Population703,177
Gender51.2% Female, 48.8% Male
Race77.1% White, 18.4% Black, 1.0% Asian
Ethnicity16.4% Hispanic
Unemployment8.1%
Median household income$41,834
High school graduation rate82.8%
College graduation rate19.7%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
The 1st congressional district of Texas is located on northeastern Texas, on the border with Louisiana and Arkansas. Prior to the 2011 redistricting, it contained the counties of Angelina, Cass, Gregg, Harrison, Marion, Nacogdoches, Panola, Rusk, Sabine, San Augustine, Shelby, Smith, and Upshur.[1] Its major metropolitan areas were Lufkin-Nacogdoches, Longview-Marshall, and Tyler.

The current representative of the 1st congressional district is Louie Gohmert (R).

Elections

2012

See also: Texas' 1st congressional district elections, 2012

The 1st congressional district of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012 in which incumbent Louie Gohmert (R) won re-election. He defeated Shirley McKellar (D) and Clark Patterson (L) in the general election.[2]

U.S. House, Texas District 1 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngLouie Gohmert Incumbent 71.4% 178,322
     Democratic Shirley J. McKellar 26.9% 67,222
     Libertarian Clark Patterson 1.6% 4,114
Total Votes 249,658
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Louie Gohmert won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Charles Parkes, III (L) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Texas District 1 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngLouie Gohmert incumbent 89.7% 129,398
     Libertarian Charles Parkes, III 10.3% 14,811
Total Votes 144,209

2008
On November 4, 2008, Louie Gohmert won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Roger Owen (I) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Texas District 1 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngLouie Gohmert incumbent 87.6% 189,012
     Independent Roger Owen 12.4% 26,814
Total Votes 215,826

2006
On November 7, 2006, Louie Gohmert won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Roger Owen (D) and Donald Perkison (L) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Texas District 1 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngLouie Gohmert incumbent 68% 104,099
     Democratic Roger Owen 30.2% 46,303
     Libertarian Donald Perkison 1.7% 2,668
Total Votes 153,070

2004
On November 2, 2004, Louie Gohmert won election to the United States House. He defeated incumbent Max Sandlin (D) and Dean Tucker (L) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Texas District 1 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngLouie Gohmert 61.5% 157,068
     Democratic Max Sandlin incumbent 37.7% 96,281
     Libertarian Dean Tucker 0.8% 2,158
Total Votes 255,507

2002
On November 5, 2002, Max Sandlin won re-election to the United States House. He defeated John Lawrence (R) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Texas District 1 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMax Sandlin incumbent 56.4% 86,384
     Republican John Lawrence 43.6% 66,654
Total Votes 153,038

2000
On November 7, 2000, Max Sandlin won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Noble Willingham (R) and Ray Carr (L) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Texas District 1 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMax Sandlin incumbent 55.8% 118,157
     Republican Noble Willingham 43.4% 91,912
     Libertarian Ray Carr 0.8% 1,779
Total Votes 211,848

1998
On November 3, 1998, Max Sandlin won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Dennis Boerner (R) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Texas District 1 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMax Sandlin incumbent 59.4% 80,788
     Republican Dennis Boerner 40.6% 55,191
Total Votes 135,979

1996
On November 5, 1996, Max Sandlin won election to the United States House. He defeated Ed Merritt (R) and Margaret Palms (Natural Law) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Texas District 1 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMax Sandlin 51.6% 102,697
     Republican Ed Merritt 46.7% 93,105
     Natural Law Margaret Palms 1.7% 3,368
Total Votes 199,170

1994
On November 8, 1994, Jim Chapman won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Mike Blankenship (R) and Thomas Moesser (I) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Texas District 1 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJim Chapman incumbent 55.3% 86,480
     Republican Mike Blankenship 40.9% 63,911
     Independent Thomas Moesser 3.8% 6,001
Total Votes 156,392

1992
On November 3, 1992, Jim Chapman won re-election to the United States House. He ran unopposed in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Texas District 1 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJim Chapman incumbent 100% 152,209
Total Votes 152,209

1990
On November 6, 1990, Jim Chapman won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Hamp Hodges (R) in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, Texas District 1 General Election, 1990
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJim Chapman incumbent 61% 89,241
     Republican Hamp Hodges 39% 56,954
Total Votes 146,195

Redistricting

The 1st Congressional District of Texas, prior to the 2010-2011 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas was redistricted in 2011. The controversial map approved by the Texas Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Perry has been appealed, and the case has been taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court.[14]

External links

See also

References

  1. Louie Gohmert House website "District," Accessed December 14, 2011
  2. Politico "2012 Election Map, Texas"
  3. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  4. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  5. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  6. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  7. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  8. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  9. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  10. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1990," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. Washington Times "High court to ponder Texas redistricting," Accessed December 14, 2011