Texas' 23rd Congressional District

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Texas' 23rd congressional district
Current incumbentPete Gallego Democratic Party
Population725,874
Gender50.4% Female, 49.6% Male
Race84.2% White, 2.4% Black, 1.2% Asian
Ethnicity70.8% Hispanic
Unemployment8.8%
Median household income$46,232
High school graduation rate73.0%
College graduation rate20.7%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
Texas' 23rd Congressional District is located in the western portion of the state and includes El Paso, Hudspeth, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Reeves, Presidio, Brewster, Lvoing , Winkler, Ward, Crane, Upton, Reagan, Terrell, Pecos, Crockett, Schleicher, Sutton, Edwards, Val Verde, Kinney, Maverick, Uvalde, Zavala, Dimmit, La Salle, Frio, Medina and Bexar counties.[1]

The district previously was 8th largest congressional district in the country not counting at-large districts. It stretched across the southwestern portion of Texas.

The current representative of the 23rd congressional district is Pete Gallego (D).

In redistricting, The Hill published a list of the Top Ten House Members who were helped by redistricting.[2] Francisco Canseco ranked 3rd on the list.[2]

Elections

2012

See also: Texas' 23rd congressional district elections, 2012

The 23rd congressional district of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012, in which Pete Gallego (D) won election. He defeated incumbent Francisco Canseco (R), Jeffrey Blunt (L) and Ed Scharf (G) in the general election. This switched partisan control of the district.[3]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngPete Gallego 50.3% 96,676
     Republican Francisco Canseco Incumbent 45.6% 87,547
     Libertarian Jeffrey C. Blunt 3% 5,841
     Green Ed Scharf 1.1% 2,105
Total Votes 192,169
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Francisco Canseco won election to the United States House. He defeated Ciro Rodriguez (D), Craig Stephens (I), Martin Nitschke (L) and Ed Scharf (G) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngFrancisco Canseco 49.4% 74,853
     Democratic Ciro Rodriguez incumbent 44.4% 67,348
     Independent Craig Stephens 3.6% 5,432
     Libertarian Martin Nitschke 1.6% 2,482
     Green Ed Scharf 0.9% 1,419
Total Votes 151,534

2008
On November 4, 2008, Ciro Rodriguez won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Lyle Larson (R) and Lani Connolly (L) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCiro Rodriguez incumbent 55.8% 134,090
     Republican Lyle Larson 41.9% 100,799
     Libertarian Lani Connolly 2.3% 5,581
Total Votes 240,470

2006
On November 7, 2006, Ciro Rodriguez won election to the United States House. He defeated Henry Bonilla (R) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCiro Rodriguez 54.3% 38,256
     Republican Henry Bonilla incumbent 45.7% 32,217
Total Votes 70,473

2004
On November 2, 2004, Henry Bonilla won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Joe Sullivan (D) and Nazirite Perez (L) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHenry Bonilla incumbent 69.3% 170,716
     Democratic Joe Sullivan 29.4% 72,480
     Libertarian Nazirite Perez 1.3% 3,307
Total Votes 246,503

2002
On November 5, 2002, Henry Bonilla won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Henry Cuellar (D), Jeffrey Blunt (L) and Ed Scharf (G) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHenry Bonilla incumbent 51.5% 77,573
     Democratic Henry Cuellar 47.2% 71,067
     Libertarian Jeffrey Blunt 0.7% 1,106
     Write-in Ed Scharf 0.5% 806
Total Votes 150,552

2000
On November 7, 2000, Henry Bonilla won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Isidro Garza, Jr. (D) and Jeffrey Blunt (L) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHenry Bonilla incumbent 59.3% 119,679
     Democratic Isidro Garza, Jr. 38.8% 78,274
     Libertarian Jeffrey Blunt 1.9% 3,801
Total Votes 201,754

1998
On November 3, 1998, Henry Bonilla won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Charlie Urbina Jones (D) and William Stallknecht (L) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHenry Bonilla incumbent 63.8% 73,177
     Democratic Charlie Urbina Jones 35.1% 40,281
     Libertarian William Stallknecht 1.1% 1,262
Total Votes 114,720

1996
On November 5, 1996, Henry Bonilla won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Charles Jones (D) and Linda Caswell (Natural Law) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHenry Bonilla incumbent 61.8% 101,332
     Democratic Charles Jones 36.4% 59,596
     Natural Law Linda Caswell 1.8% 2,911
Total Votes 163,839

1994
On November 8, 1994, Henry Bonilla won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Rolando Rios (D) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHenry Bonilla incumbent 62.6% 73,815
     Democratic Rolando Rios 37.4% 44,101
Total Votes 117,916

1992
On November 3, 1992, Henry Bonilla won election to the United States House. He defeated Albert Bustamante (D) and David Alter (L) in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngHenry Bonilla 59.1% 98,259
     Democratic Albert Bustamante incumbent 38.4% 63,797
     Libertarian David Alter 2.6% 4,291
Total Votes 166,347

1990
On November 6, 1990, Albert Bustamante won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Jerome Gonzales (R) in the general election.[14]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 1990
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAlbert Bustamante incumbent 63.5% 71,052
     Republican Jerome Gonzales 36.5% 40,856
Total Votes 111,908

Redistricting

The 23rd Congressional District of Texas, prior to the 2010-2011 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas was redistricted in 2011. The controversial map approved by the Texas Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Perry has been appealed, and the case has been taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court.[15]

In redistricting, The Hill published a list of the Top Ten House Members who were helped by redistricting.[2] Francisco Canseco ranked 3rd on the list.[2] The article notes that in the redistricting process, Republican legislators were "careful when they redrew the district not to bring down the district’s Hispanic percentage in order to avoid violating the Voting Rights Act, which protects minority voters."[2] Instead, redistricting switched out high-voting Democratic Hispanic areas with areas that have lower turnout.[2] According to the article, if the district stands up to legal scrutiny, Canseco will be in a better position heading into the 2012 election.[2]

External links

See also

References

  1. Texas Redistricting Map "Map" accessed July 24, 2012
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 The Hill "House members most helped by redistricting" Accessed April 17, 2012
  3. Politico "2012 Election Map, Texas"
  4. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  5. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  6. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  7. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  8. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  9. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  10. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1990," accessed March 28, 2013
  15. Washington Times "High court to ponder Texas redistricting," Accessed December 14, 2011