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Texas' 24th Congressional District

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The 24th congressional district of Texas is a congressional district that serves a suburban area in between Fort Worth and Dallas in the state of Texas.

Texas' 24th Congressional District is located in the northern portion of the state and includes portions of Tarrant, Denton and Dallas counties.[1]

The district previously included a suburban area in between Forth Worth and Dallas.

The current representative of the 24th congressional district is Kenny Marchant (R).

Elections

2012

See also: Texas' 24th congressional district elections, 2012

The 24th congressional district of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012, in which incumbent Kenny Marchant (R) won re-election. He defeated Tim Rusk (D) and John Stathas (L) in the general election.[2]

U.S. House, Texas District 24 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngKenny Marchant Incumbent 61% 148,586
     Democratic Tim Rusk 36% 87,645
     Libertarian John Stathas 3% 7,258
Total Votes 243,489
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Kenny Marchant won re-election to the United States House. He defeated David Sparks (L) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Texas District 24 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngKenny Marchant incumbent 81.6% 100,078
     Libertarian David Sparks 18.4% 22,609
Total Votes 122,687

2008
On November 4, 2008, Kenny Marchant won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Tom Love (D) and David Casey (L) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Texas District 24 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngKenny Marchant incumbent 56% 151,434
     Democratic Tom Love 41.1% 111,089
     Libertarian David Casey 2.9% 7,972
Total Votes 270,495

2006
On November 7, 2006, Kenny Marchant won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Gary Page (D) and Mark Frohman (L) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Texas District 24 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngKenny Marchant incumbent 59.8% 83,835
     Democratic Gary Page 37.2% 52,075
     Libertarian Mark Frohman 3% 4,228
Total Votes 140,138

2004
On November 2, 2004, Kenny Marchant won election to the United States House. He defeated Gary Page (D) and James Lawrence (L) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Texas District 24 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngKenny Marchant 64% 154,435
     Democratic Gary Page 34.2% 82,599
     Libertarian James Lawrence 1.8% 4,340
Total Votes 241,374

2002
On November 5, 2002, Martin Frost won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Mike Rivera Ortega (R) and Ken Ashby (L) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Texas District 24 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMartin Frost incumbent 64.7% 73,002
     Republican Mike Rivera Ortega 34% 38,332
     Libertarian Ken Ashby 1.4% 1,560
Total Votes 112,894

2000
On November 7, 2000, Martin Frost won re-election to the United States House. He defeated James Wright (R) and Robert Worthington (Write-in) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Texas District 24 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMartin Frost incumbent 61.8% 103,152
     Republican James Wright 36.7% 61,235
     Write-in Robert Worthington 1.5% 2,561
Total Votes 166,948

1998
On November 3, 1998, Martin Frost won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Shawn Terry (R), George Arias (I) and David Stover (L) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Texas District 24 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMartin Frost incumbent 57.5% 56,321
     Republican Shawn Terry 40.9% 40,105
     Independent George Arias 0.8% 830
     Libertarian David Stover 0.8% 736
Total Votes 97,992

1996
On November 5, 1996, Martin Frost won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Ed Harrison (R), Marion Jacob (D) and Dale Mouton (I) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Texas District 24 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMartin Frost incumbent 55.7% 77,847
     Republican Ed Harrison 39.1% 54,551
     Democratic Marion Jacob 3.3% 4,656
     Independent Dale Mouton 1.8% 2,574
     N/A Write-in 0% 9
Total Votes 139,637

1994
On November 8, 1994, Martin Frost won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Ed Harrison (R) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Texas District 24 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMartin Frost incumbent 52.8% 65,019
     Republican Ed Harrison 47.2% 58,062
Total Votes 123,081

1992
On November 3, 1992, Martin Frost won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Steve Masterson (R) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Texas District 24 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMartin Frost incumbent 59.8% 104,174
     Republican Steve Masterson 40.2% 70,042
Total Votes 174,216

1990
On November 6, 1990, Martin Frost won re-election to the United States House. He ran unopposed in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, Texas District 24 General Election, 1990
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMartin Frost incumbent 100% 86,297
Total Votes 86,297

Redistricting

The 24th Congressional District of Texas, prior to the 2010-2011 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas was redistricted in 2011. The controversial map approved by the Texas Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Perry has been appealed, and the case has been taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court.[14]

External links

See also

References