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Texas' 26th Congressional District

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Texas' 26th congressional district
Texas' 26th.JPG
Current incumbentMichael Burgess Republican Party
Population722,749
Gender50.9% Female, 49.1% Male
Race82.2% White, 6.6% Black, 5.1% Asian
Ethnicity16.1% Hispanic
Unemployment7.5%
Median household income$75,069
High school graduation rate93.3%
College graduation rate40.6%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
Texas' 26th Congressional District is located in the northern portion of the state and includes portions of Denton and Tarrant counties.[1]

The district previously centered around Denton County.

The current representative of the 26th congressional district is Michael C. Burgess (R).

Elections

2014

See also: Texas' 26th congressional district elections, 2014

The 26th congressional district of Texas will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014.

2012

See also: Texas' 26th congressional district elections, 2012

The 26th congressional district of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012, in which incumbent Michael C. Burgess (R) won re-election. He defeated David Sanchez (D) and Mark Boler (L) in the general election.[2]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMichael Burgess Incumbent 68.3% 176,642
     Democratic David Sanchez 28.7% 74,237
     Libertarian Mark Boler 3% 7,844
Total Votes 258,723
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Michael Burgess won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Neil Durrance (D) and Mark Boler (L) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMichael Burgess incumbent 67.1% 120,984
     Democratic Neil Durrance 30.7% 55,385
     Libertarian Mark Boler 2.3% 4,062
Total Votes 180,431

2008
On November 4, 2008, Michael Burgess won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Ken Leach (D) and Stephanie Weiss (L) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMichael Burgess incumbent 60.2% 195,181
     Democratic Ken Leach 36.4% 118,167
     Libertarian Stephanie Weiss 3.4% 11,028
Total Votes 324,376

2006
On November 7, 2006, Michael Burgess won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Tim Barnwell (D) and Rich Haas (L) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMichael Burgess incumbent 60.2% 94,219
     Democratic Tim Barnwell 37.2% 58,271
     Libertarian Rich Haas 2.6% 3,993
Total Votes 156,483

2004
On November 2, 2004, Michael Burgess won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Lico Reyes (D) and James Gholston (L) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMichael Burgess incumbent 65.8% 180,519
     Democratic Lico Reyes 32.7% 89,809
     Libertarian James Gholston 1.5% 4,211
Total Votes 274,539

2002
On November 5, 2002, Michael Burgess won election to the United States House. He defeated Paul William LeBon (D), David Wallace Croft (L) and Gary Page (G) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMichael Burgess 74.8% 123,195
     Democratic Paul William LeBon 22.8% 37,485
     Libertarian David Wallace Croft 1.4% 2,367
     Green Gary Page 1% 1,631
Total Votes 164,678

2000
On November 7, 2000, Richard Armey won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Steve Love (D) and Fred Badagnani (L) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRichard Armey incumbent 72.5% 214,025
     Democratic Steve Love 25.6% 75,601
     Libertarian Fred Badagnani 1.9% 5,646
Total Votes 295,272

1998
On November 3, 1998, Richard Armey won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Joe Turner (L) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRichard Armey incumbent 88.1% 120,332
     Libertarian Joe Turner 11.9% 16,182
Total Votes 136,514

1996
On November 5, 1996, Richard Armey won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Jerry Frankel (D) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRichard Armey incumbent 73.6% 163,708
     Democratic Jerry Frankel 26.4% 58,623
     N/A Write-in 0% 11
Total Votes 222,342

1994
On November 8, 1994, Richard Armey won re-election to the United States House. He defeated LeEarl Ann Bryant (D) and Alfred Adask (L) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRichard Armey incumbent 76.4% 135,398
     Democratic LeEarl Ann Bryant 22.4% 39,763
     Libertarian Alfred Adask 1.1% 2,030
Total Votes 177,191

1992
On November 3, 1992, Richard Armey won re-election to the United States House. He defeated John Wayne Caton (D) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRichard Armey incumbent 73.1% 150,209
     Democratic John Wayne Caton 26.9% 55,237
     N/A Write-in 0% 85
Total Votes 205,531

1990
On November 6, 1990, Richard Armey won re-election to the United States House. He defeated John Wayne Caton (D) in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 1990
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRichard Armey incumbent 70.4% 147,856
     Democratic John Wayne Caton 29.6% 62,158
Total Votes 210,014

Redistricting

The 26th Congressional District of Texas, prior to the 2010-2011 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas was redistricted in 2011. The controversial map approved by the Texas Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Perry was appealed and taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court before going into effect.[14]

External links

See also

References