Texas' 28th Congressional District

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Texas' 28th congressional district
Current incumbentHenry Cuellar Democratic Party
Population710,260
Gender50.8% Female, 49.2% Male
Race87.2% White, 4.2% Black
Ethnicity78.4% Hispanic
Unemployment7.8%
Median household income$39,603
High school graduation rate68.8%
College graduation rate15.5%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
Texas' 28th Congressional District is located in the southern portion of the state and includes Bexar, Wilson, Atascosa, McMullen, Webb, Zapata, Starr and Hildago counties.[1]

The district previously included an area starting south of San Antonio and ending at the U.S.-Mexico border.

The current representative of the 28th congressional district is Henry Cuellar (R).

Elections

2014

See also: Texas' 28th congressional district elections, 2014

The 28th congressional district of Texas will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014.

2012

See also: Texas' 28th congressional district elections, 2012

The 28th congressional district of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012, in which incumbent Henry Cuellar (D) won re-election. He defeated William Hayward (R), Patrick Hisel (L) and Michael Cary (G) in the general election.[2]

U.S. House, Texas District 28 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngHenry Cuellar Incumbent 67.9% 112,456
     Republican William R. Hayward 29.8% 49,309
     Libertarian Patrick Hisel 1.5% 2,473
     Green Michael D. Cary 0.8% 1,407
Total Votes 165,645
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Henry Cuellar won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Bryan Underwood (R) and Stephen Kaat (L) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Texas District 28 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngHenry Cuellar incumbent 56.3% 62,773
     Republican Bryan Underwood 42% 46,740
     Libertarian Stephen Kaat 1.7% 1,889
Total Votes 111,402

2008
On November 4, 2008, Henry Cuellar won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Jim Fish (R) and Ross Lynn Leone (L) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Texas District 28 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngHenry Cuellar incumbent 68.7% 123,494
     Republican Jim Fish 29.2% 52,524
     Libertarian Ross Lynn Leone 2.1% 3,722
Total Votes 179,740

2006
On November 7, 2006, Henry Cuellar won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Frank Enriquez (D) and Ron Avery (Conservative) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Texas District 28 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngHenry Cuellar incumbent 67.6% 52,574
     Republican Frank Enriquez 20.3% 15,798
     Conservative Ron Avery 12.1% 9,383
Total Votes 77,755

2004
On November 2, 2004, Henry Cuellar won election to the United States House. He defeated James Hopson (R) and Ken Ashby (L) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Texas District 28 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngHenry Cuellar 59% 106,323
     Republican James Hopson 38.6% 69,538
     Libertarian Ken Ashby 2.4% 4,305
Total Votes 180,166

2002
On November 5, 2002, Ciro Rodriguez won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Gabriel Perales, Jr. (R) and William Stallknecht (L) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Texas District 28 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCiro Rodriguez incumbent 71.1% 71,393
     Republican Gabriel Perales, Jr. 26.9% 26,973
     Libertarian William Stallknecht 2% 2,054
Total Votes 100,420

2000
On November 7, 2000, Ciro Rodriguez won re-election to the United States House. He defeated William Stallknecht (L) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Texas District 28 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCiro Rodriguez incumbent 89% 123,104
     Libertarian William Stallknecht 11% 15,156
Total Votes 138,260

1998
On November 3, 1998, Ciro Rodriguez won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Edward Elmer (L) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Texas District 28 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCiro Rodriguez incumbent 90.5% 71,849
     Libertarian Edward Elmer 9.5% 7,504
Total Votes 79,353

1996
On November 5, 1996, Frank Tejeda won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Mark Cude (R) and Clifford Finley (Natural Law) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Texas District 28 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngFrank Tejeda incumbent 75.4% 110,148
     Republican Mark Cude 23.4% 34,191
     Natural Law Clifford Finley 1.2% 1,796
Total Votes 146,135

1994
On November 8, 1994, Frank Tejeda won re-election to the United States House. He defeated David Slatter (R) and Stephen Rothstein (L) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Texas District 28 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngFrank Tejeda incumbent 70.9% 73,986
     Republican David Slatter 27.6% 28,777
     Libertarian Stephen Rothstein 1.5% 1,612
Total Votes 104,375

1992
On November 3, 1992, Frank Tejeda won election to the United States House. He defeated David Slatter (L) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Texas District 28 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngFrank Tejeda 87.1% 122,457
     Libertarian David Slatter 12.9% 18,128
Total Votes 140,585

Redistricting

The 28th Congressional District of Texas, prior to the 2010-2011 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas was redistricted in 2011. The controversial map approved by the Texas Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Perry was appealed and taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court before going into effect.[13]

External links

See also

References