Texas' 34th Congressional District elections, 2012

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Texas' 34th Congressional District

General Election Date
November 6, 2012

Primary Date
May 29, 2012

November 6 Election Winner:
Filemon Vela Democratic Party
Incumbent prior to election:
Newly created district

Texas U.S. House Elections
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2012 U.S. Senate Elections

Flag of Texas.png
The 34th congressional district of Texas is a new district created during the recent redistricting cycle as a result of the 2010 Census. It held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012.

Filemon Vela (D) was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. This was a newly created district due to the 2010 census.[1]

Candidate Filing Deadline Primary Election General Election
March 9, 2012
May 29, 2012
November 6, 2012

Primary: Texas has an open primary system, in which any registered voter can choose which party's primary to vote in, without having to be a member of that party. Texas also scheduled a primary runoff for July 31, 2012.

Voter registration: Voters had to register to vote in the primary by April 30.[2] For the July 31, 2012, the vote registration deadline was July 2. For the general election, the voter registration deadline was October 9.[3]

See also: Texas elections, 2012


This was the first election using new district maps based on 2010 Census data. Texas' 34th congressional district was located in the southern portion of the state, and included Gonzales, Dewitt, Goliad, Bee, San Patricio, Jim Wells, Kleberg, Kenedy, Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo counties.[4]

* Redistricting note: Due to legal turmoil in the redistricting process, filing deadlines were changed twice and the primary was changed once. The original filing deadline was December 12th.[5] That deadline was first moved to December 15th and then December 19th by a federal court due to delays caused by redistricting legal challenges. When a final map was issued, the December 19th deadline was once again moved to March 9 to allow candidates more time to file in light of the delays and map ambiguities. The primary date was first moved from March 6 to April 3, 2012 before finally settling on May 29.[6]

Candidates

Note: Election results were added on election night as races were called. Vote totals will be added when official election results are certified. For more information about Ballotpedia's election coverage plan, click here. If you find any errors in this list, please email: Geoff Pallay.

General election candidates

Democratic Party Filemon VelaGreen check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Jessica Puente Bradshaw
Libertarian Party Steven Shanklin

July 31, 2012 Democratic primary runoff candidates


July 31, 2012, Republican primary runoff candidates


May 29, 2012, primary results

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Republican Party Republican Primary

Note: The following candidates withdrew prior to the primary: Marc Young

Libertarian Party Libertarian Convention

Independent Independent candidate

Election results

General election

U.S. House, Texas District 34 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngFilemon Vela 61.9% 89,606
     Republican Jessica Puente Bradshaw 36.2% 52,448
     Libertarian Steven Shanklin 1.9% 2,724
Total Votes 144,778
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Impact of redistricting

See also: Redistricting in Texas

The 34th district was created after the 2010 Census. The new district is composed of the following percentages of voters of the old congressional districts.[8][9]

District partisanship

FairVote's Monopoly Politics 2012

See also: FairVote's Monopoly Politics 2012

In 2012, FairVote did a study on partisanship in the congressional districts, giving each a percentage ranking (D/R) based on the new 2012 maps and comparing that to the old 2010 maps. Partisanship figures for this district relating to the incumbent are unavailable due to the seat being open.Cite error: Closing </ref> missing for <ref> tag

See also

External links

References