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Texas' 35th Congressional District

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Texas' 35th congressional district
Current incumbentLloyd Doggett Democratic Party
Population724,271
Gender50.4% Male, 49.6% Female
Race64.0% White, 9.6% Black, 1.6% Asian
Ethnicity64.1% Hispanic
Unemployment10.7%
Median household income$36,792
High school graduation rate72.3%
College graduation rate15.0%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
The 35th congressional district of Texas is a new district created during the recent redistricting cycle as a result of the 2010 Census. It was ranked by the National Journal as one of the ten most contorted congressional districts as a result of redistricting.[1]

Texas' 35th Congressional District is located in the central portion of the state and includes portions of Travis, Hayes, Caldwell, Comal and Bexar counties.[2]

The current representative of the 35th congressional district is Lloyd Doggett (D).

Elections

2012

See also: Texas' 35th congressional district elections, 2012

The 35th congressional district of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. in which the incumbent from the 25th district, Lloyd Doggett (D) won election. He defeated Susan Narvaiz (R), Ross Lynn Leone (L), Meghan Owen (G) and Simon Alvarado (I) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Texas District 35 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngLloyd Doggett Incumbent 63.9% 105,626
     Republican Susan Narvaiz 32% 52,894
     Libertarian Ross Lynn Leone 2.5% 4,082
     Green Meghan Owen 1.5% 2,540
     Write-in Simon Alvarado 0% 37
Total Votes 165,179
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Redistricting

See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas was redistricted in 2011. The controversial map approved by the Texas Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Perry has been appealed, and the case has been taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court.[4] The 35th district was ranked by the National Journal as one of the ten most contorted congressional districts as a result of redistricting.[1]

External links

See also

References